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by various,Jon Friedman
Download Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped, and Canceled fb2
Humor
  • Author:
    various,Jon Friedman
  • ISBN:
    0345500962
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345500960
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Villard; First Edition edition (January 27, 2009)
  • Pages:
    252 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1433 kb
  • ePUB format
    1298 kb
  • DJVU format
    1893 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    793
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf doc


Rejected: Tales of the F. .has been added to your Cart. I recently heard an interview with John Friedman, and perhaps better than anything in this book were some of his insights on what it means to fail and, in this case, what it means to celebrate failure

Rejected: Tales of the F. I recently heard an interview with John Friedman, and perhaps better than anything in this book were some of his insights on what it means to fail and, in this case, what it means to celebrate failure. By looking at his failures as something to be collected, as positives in that regard, he gave himself the freedom he needed to really take some creative risks. Although not as funny, thoughts on the nature of rejection itself would have given this book a little more heft. 2 people found this helpful.

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Jon Friedman is a comedian, writer, and producer best known for The Rejection Show. His work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, as well as on NPR and ABC News. He lives in New York. Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped, and Canceled. Random House Publishing Group, 2009.

There was so much I could relate to and somehow found the experience of reading it to be uplifting, encouraging and so very funny. I heartily recommend Rejected to anyone who has been turned down, cast aside, brokenhearted or enjoys a good laugh.

Friedman gathers a hilarious compilation of rejection stories and rejected works from .

Friedman gathers a hilarious compilation of rejection stories and rejected works from well-known and under-the-radar comedians, writers, artists, and television personalities.

Jon Friedman is a comedian, writer, and host of the The Rejection Show, New York City’s live showcase of rejected work. His new book is Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Cancelled. We’ll hear about Friedman’s early days screening unsolicited submissions for The New Yorker and Comedy Central, plus what it’s like at his Download audio. How to listen to Bullseye with Jesse Thorn.

Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Canceled.

At least that’s the view of John Friedman, creator of Rejection Show, a live New York program offering writers the opportunity to read the stuff that someone else didn’t want. Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Canceled.

John Friedman runs a show in New York called The Rejection Show, which celebrates the all-too-common experience of not succeeding. Overall, the material in all over the place. Some of it, honestly, should have been rejected. Other pieces have moments of laugh-out-loud humor. Neil Pollack’s short story, Brother Elk, is a pretty solid short story.

The Rejection Show was created by comedian and writer Jon Friedman (producer, host) in the summer of 2003 .

The Rejection Show was created by comedian and writer Jon Friedman (producer, host) in the summer of 2003 after a string of his own personal and creative rejections left him wanting to create a forum for such works that other people deemed "not good enough. The show features material that is both good and bad and maintains its strength in the deep variety nature of the show, from stories of personal heartbreak to rejected sketches from Saturday Night Live to rejected cartoons from The New Yorker.

Besides being born and dying, the most common human experience is being rejected–dissed, dumped on, or downsized–by lovers, parents, and employers. Now here’s a hilarious collection of rejection stories–and rejected works–by some of today’s most accomplished comic writers and performers (some world famous) sharing their pieces that were ripped to pieces and their own experiences of being handed their hats, heads, and hearts on a platter. • Bob Witfong recalls being hired as a correspondent by The Daily Showbut never called in to work; then being fired by mistake; then going on air and called “creepy” by bloggers; and then actually being fired. • Meredith Hoffa has her pubescent crush destroyed by a new haircut modeled on Mary Stuart Masterson’ s in Some Kind of Wonderfuljust when “the size of my face and body had caught up to the gigantic size of my teeth.” • Joel Stein (celebrity interviewer for Time) receives an earful from Buddy Hackett who, before slamming down the phone, says: “You’re being kind of, what do you call it, I don’t know, those wise-guy papers? Tabloids.” • Dave Hill offers his piece for a British “lad” mag in which he went undercover with a police vice squad, an article killed because he didn’t go “far enough” with a transvestite prostitute. • Jackie Cohen fails her audition for the synagogue choir–at age five. • And many more too painful to mention. Featuring essays, jokes, sketches, cartoons, and articles passed on by venues as varied as Saturday Night Live and Reader’s Digest, Rejected is a priceless compilation that reminds us it’s a-okay to be a big loser. Praise for Rejected“The overall quality of the work is remarkable; Friedman allows his writers immense latitude in style and substance while keeping his theme front and center. [Rejected] has something for everyone, laughs on just about every page, and an ultimately uplifting spirit; if every rejection is an opportunity, then the chance to be a part of this fine, funny collaboration was probably worth it—especially for readers.”—Publishers Weekly “No one has ever made being a reject this funny! If you read only one book this year about being a total loser, make it this one.”—Lizz Winstead, founding member of Air America Radio and co-creator of The Daily Show “This book shows that we are truly living in bizarro world where the rejected should be the accepted and the accepted should be . . . anyway, this is an awesome and wonderfully comedic book.”—Jonathan Ames, author of The Alcoholic “I’d like to thank the contributors for their humiliation, pain and suffering, because it sure makes for a funny book.”—A.J. Jacobs, author of The Year of Living Biblically

Ausstan
John Friedman runs a show in New York called The Rejection Show, which celebrates the all-too-common experience of not succeeding. This book is a collection of some material from that show, various writers, comedians, actors and cartoonists reflecting on their favorite rejections.

Overall, the material in all over the place. Some of it, honestly, should have been rejected. Other pieces have moments of laugh-out-loud humor. Neil Pollack's short story, "Brother Elk," is a pretty solid short story. And both the collection of rejected headlines from The Onion and rejected jokes from Saturday Night Live's "Weekend Update" both have some hilarious lines. But in general, the bigger the bomb, the better the comedy. And that goes to Kevin McDonald's recounting of a show his comedy troupe did at El Macombo rock club. It ends with the audience hurling homophobic insults (their act followed a gay men's choir) and two of the performers getting into a fistfight on stage.

I recently heard an interview with John Friedman, and perhaps better than anything in this book were some of his insights on what it means to fail and, in this case, what it means to celebrate failure. By looking at his failures as something to be collected, as positives in that regard, he gave himself the freedom he needed to really take some creative risks. Although not as funny, thoughts on the nature of rejection itself would have given this book a little more heft.
Rageseeker
Loaded with fun great stories! Great variety too. If you buy it and don't like it you can personally reject it and return it! But you won't. It's a great read...
the monster
This is a nice assortment of unacceptable stuff. And I found it all the more interesting because it's so clear why some of the sketches, stories, or ideas were unacceptable. Some are hilarious, many mildly amusing or touching, however reading most one can understand what failed to appeal to the powers that be. 'Losing It,' the chapter by Michael Colton was probably my favorite, but it is gentle family humor. Maybe it's my poor vision, but the smudgy little thingies on each chapter heading troubled me. I'd got to looking to determine what on earth they were but never decided unless they were supposed to be erasures? Minor detail. I liked the variety of types of rejection! The book was good.
skriper
Even though my own work was rejected from Rejected (ahem), this is a hilarious look behind the scenes of the writing and comedic life, ranging from Wendy Spero's perfectly hilarious story of getting (and keeping) internships at Letterman and Conan to Sara Schaefer's tale of heartbreak. In some ways, the lead-ins about how and why the pieces got rejected are just as valuable as the stories themselves. Some are a bit too self-indulgent (the dissection of hate mail), while some are the kind you wish you'd have written to a total loser date (see Mike Albo's scathing takedown of one of his own dates). Others are stories you're sure the original editor is kicking themselves for not having included. Adrienne Frost's stalking tale is also among the highlights, and anyone who's contemplated doing anything to meet their biggest idol, will want to check it out. Friedman's introduction, and the overall spirit of the book--one of recognizing that one rejection does not mean rejection forever--is one any writer needs to acknowledge if they are going to make a career out of it.
JoJogar
A great premise for a book that is executed poorly. This comedy writer/editor contacts a bunch of other unknown comedians and asks them to tell stories of when they have been rejected. It turns into one big gripe book--where they individually tell really boring stories that you wouldn't want to hear from your best friend much less from a know-it-all stand up who you've never heard of. While they try to make the stories funny, they're really all pretty depressing and humorless.

They have an SNL freelance joke writer who has had only one joke used out of 600 submitted! You have a guy who was under contract as a correspondent on The Daily Show who repeatedly wouldn't get called to be on the air. You have a directionless, pot-smoking college grad who decides to use her "talent" for lying to get internships at both Letterman and Conan without mentioning the conflict to either show ("I'm not a liar, really" she writes!)

There are one or two semi-known names (Joel Stein from Time magazine--wow!). There's one "chapter" from a minor performer on "The Office" that is literally one paragraph long and the woman's bio is about as long as her contribution to the book! It's also annoying that the mini-bios of the writers come at the end of the chapter--why not start each essay with it so we know who is writing it?

After reading each short essay the response is, "Who cares?" These aren't stories that you can learn from--they are just opportunities for the unfamous to whine about not being better recognized. It's only going to be of interest to New Yorkers who find conversations while standing in line at Starbucks fascinating. Everyone else should just reject it.
Nikojas
I write a few things so thought this book would hit the spot of rejection, something we all deal with. About every fourth story might give you an idea of rejection in the writing world but really was disappointing to me ... I only finished it out of a desire to see if there was anything funny in there and there is unfortunately very, very little and you had to really look for it. Didnt get this one at all.
Venemarr
This book is hilarious! I got through it with a box of tissues from laughing so hard. This book has a way of spinning rejection into something positive which is definitely something we all can relate to.
This book is a must-have. Buy it now!
A thoroughly entertaining, laugh out loud truly original anthology. Filled with many different kinds of rejection that leaves you feeling good inside. Highly, highly recommended to anyone looking for a good time read.