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by Deborah Copaken Kogan
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Humor
  • Author:
    Deborah Copaken Kogan
  • ISBN:
    1401340814
  • ISBN13:
    978-1401340810
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hachette Books; First Edition edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humor
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1324 kb
  • ePUB format
    1201 kb
  • DJVU format
    1586 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    213
  • Formats:
    txt mbr doc lrf


Julie Klam, author of Please Excuse My Daughter. Brave, funny, and charged with equal measures of regret and joy, Kogan's parenting misadventures spring from the page. Deborah Copaken Kogan goes where no mom has gone before in these hilarious and affecting tales of motherhood and marriage, Manhattan style. Darren Star, writer and producer of Sex and the City.

Hell Is Other Parents book. I read No Exit in my early twenties, and I remember thinking. In the case of Deborah Copaken Kogan’s personal-essay collection, Hell is Other Parents, you’re going to encounter more other tales of maternal combustion than the snarky observations about modern parenting that the title implies. That said, the main title isn’t misleading. There are snarky observations about modern parenting in Hell is Other Parents, La Vie en Explose, and The Adolescent Vulcan (a Most nonfiction has subtitles for a reason, and it’s a good idea to pay attention to them.

Hell Is Other Parents: And Other Tales of Maternal Combustion (2009), essay. The Red Book (2012), novel. The ABCs of Adulthood: An Alphabet of Life Lessons (2016), nonfiction (illustrations by Copaken and Randy Polumbo). The ABCs of Parenthood: An Alphabet of Parenting Advice (2017), nonfiction (illustration by Copaken and Randy Polumbo). "Engagements; Deborah E. Copaken, Paul M. Kogan".

Deborah Copaken Kogan is a wonderful writer whose stories of love, marriage and raising children in. .Not all the stories were about parenting, but the subtitle of the book makes it pretty clear "and other tales of maternal combustion

Deborah Copaken Kogan is a wonderful writer whose stories of love, marriage and raising children in NYC are funny and insightful. She is brave and honest, and her stories will resonate with anyone who has tried to balance a career and a family. I highly recommend this book - it is entertaining but also makes you think about some of the tough stuff. Not all the stories were about parenting, but the subtitle of the book makes it pretty clear "and other tales of maternal combustion.

From Deborah Copaken Kogan, the acclaimed author of the national bestseller Shutterbabe, comes this edgy . If all the other mothers in her Manhattan milieu are Alpha moms, Deborah Copaken Kogan is a Beta mom. Mom .

From Deborah Copaken Kogan, the acclaimed author of the national bestseller Shutterbabe, comes this edgy, insightful, and sidesplitting memoir about surviving in the trenches of modern parenting. Kogan writes situation comedy in the style of David Sedaris and Spalding Gray with a dash of spa: wry, acutely observed, and often hilarious true tales, in which the narrator is as culpable as any character.

Hell Is Other Parents is something of a misnomer,since only a few of the essays in this well-written book by DeborahCopaken Kogan relate to Mommy (or Daddy) Wars. They rightly convey thedifficulties of parenting - especially in Manhattan with a third childborn during its parents’ midlives. Many will relate to the author’sexperiences as stage mom when her son gets cast in a Star Trek movie, and to the foreseeable conclusion when she takes her toddler on atrip of several hours to see that son perform in camp.

Hell Is Other Parents And Other Tales of Maternal Combustion. In one episode, exhausted from a particularly difficult childbirth, Kogan finds herself sharing a hospital room with a foul-mouthed teen mother and her partying posse.

by Kogan, Deborah Copaken. I read No Exit in my early twenties, and I remember thinking hell might very well be other people, okay, sure, but under what far-fetched conditions would anyone ever actually be trapped forever in the company of strangers with no sleep or means of escape? Then I became a parent.

About book: Hell is not other parents. Hell was trying to get through this horrid book. I'm sure my karma was catching up to me from some previous life where I must have done something very very wrong

About book: Hell is not other parents. I'm sure my karma was catching up to me from some previous life where I must have done something very very wrong. Where do I start? First of all, I swear if she whine one more time about how poor she was I was personally going to find her and slap the ever loving hell out of her. Poor people don't go to Paris for shits and giggles

I read No Exit in my early twenties, and I remember thinking hell might very well be other people, okay, sure, but under what far-fetched conditions would anyone ever actually be trapped forever in the company of strangers with no sleep or means of escape? Then I became a parent. From Deborah Copaken Kogan, the acclaimed author of the national bestseller Shutterbabe, comes this edgy, insightful, and sidesplitting memoir about surviving in the trenches of modern parenting. Kogan writes situation comedy in the style of David Sedaris and Spalding Gray with a dash of Erma-Bombeck-on-a-Vespa: wry, acutely observed, and often hilarious true tales, in which the narrator is as culpable as any character. In these eleven linked pieces, Kogan and her husband are almost always broke while working full-time and raising three children in New York City, one of the most expensive and competitive cities in the world. In one episode, exhausted from a particularly difficult childbirth, Kogan finds herself sharing a hospital room with a foul-mouthed teen mother and her partying posse. In another, Kogan manages to crawl her way to her own emergency appendectomy, which inconveniently strikes the same week her infant's babysitter is away on vacation, her adolescents are off from school, her New York Times editor needs his edit, and the whole family catches the flu. And in the book's capper essay, she drives twelve hours, solo, with a screaming toddler in a rent-a-car in a futile effort to catch a glimpse of her eldest child in his summer camp play. Yes, Shutterbabe is all grown up and slightly worse for the wear, but her clear-eyed vision while under fire has remained intact: You've never read funnier war stories.

Bele
but I didn't like it anywhere near as well as Operating Instructions by Anne Lamott. I read it cover to cover and I think I would have enjoyed it more if I had dipped into it every now and then.
Swift Summer
I felt all the hype was about the tales of how other parents viewed her, didn't think she did that after the first chapter.
Cobandis
Although never a war-photo-journalist, I can certainly relate to "Hell is other Parents" as a hard-working professional mother. What a pleasure to read anecdotes eerily similar to some of the nightmares I have endured while sharing a laugh (or sigh) in the process. A must-read for any tightly wound, high strung, fiercely intelligent woman (with a biological clock) and a soft-spot for little ones... please write more!
Coron
The title was so brilliant I had to buy this book, but it disappointed me on many levels.

It is not a book about parenthood...It is a book about a Harvard-educated, whiny 40-something Manhattan liberal who made the ultimate sacrifice of giving up her photojournalism and network news careers to become an underemployed but well-connected freelance writer and sometimes parent of three children with little money in a cramped Manhattan apartment. The promised humor reeks of bitterness over life choices she made herself. Her poverty complaints wear a little thin intermixed with trips to LA movie lots and Paris vacations.

Instead of writing this book, the author should have gotten a salaried job, moved to the suburbs, or both.
Anarahuginn
I just made it to the second chapter of this book and so far I am really liking it. I have not had to deal with jerk parents personally yet and I love reading how this mom handles herself with those parents that are super rude and sometimes just straight mean. Be it those parents that think they know better about your own kid or parents that are just straight up jerk. I am a stay at home mom but I am still enjoying this book. Even if some of these stories are rage inducing.
Rrinel
I have to admit that the title of this book was the one thing that grabbed me. As a mother I can also appreciate all of the author's stories. I am not sure that many of them weren't embellished for effect. Come on, lying on the floor of an NYC emergency room because you are in the throes of an acute appendicitis attack and a security guard is screaming at you to get up? I have a hard time believing this one because just a few short miles to the West, this sort of thing wouldn't happen.

I can see any of these stories being told as part of a much needed rant to a girlfriend, significant other, Mom, sister, what-have-you. They are stories to be relayed and replayed, laughed at over a glass of wine or run in the park but turned into a book?????

The author did not come across as humorous as she obviously intended but instead a bit pathetic, needy, and in need of ego-stroking. She obviously has nothing to prove in the way of mothering or any of her vast accomplishments yet one cannot help but get the sense that she is bragging for attentions sake. We get that she attended Harvard but still grew up middle class, gave birth to an actor whom we have had to have seen in something what with all the name dropping she did on his behalf. I really wanted to identify with this mom but because of the boastful way she came across, had a hard time doing so.

In addition to this, maybe I am old-school but I have always believed that a book was something to be elevated past an article written for any magazine or a blog on the internet. Nowadays, it seems that anyone who has any story to tell can tell it in a book along with a shiny new cover and prime real estate in any Barnes & Noble as long as they have the right contacts. This book was seriously a misguided attempt. It was literally all over the place, went off on unrelated tangents that seemed completely beside the supposed point. It just did not seem well thought out or executed but yet something that just met the requirements of a deadline.
Coiril
I picked up this book in the PARENTING section and was so excited. I quickly opened to the introduction, a great story about the day-to-day reality of other people thinking they know better that you do how to parent your own children. Not a single one of the essays in this book have ANYTHING to do with living in a world of competitive parenting, or really parenting AT ALL. Just because you write a story about yourself and you happen to have children, whom you may or may not even mention in a given story, doesn't make this a parenting book. I might have enjoyed this book if I picked it up in the non-fiction section or biography section, but what a total disappointment. I wish I had kept my recepit.
Having attended the author's book discussion, let me first address the other reviews which complain about marketing! The author herself admitted that the title was somewhat misleading, but that it was her publisher's choice to market the book in this way. Sometimes, a writer has no choice in these matters. That said, most of the stories do address dealing with the naziism of other parents, as well as "maternal combustion."

I'll agree that it's not the best collection ever, by far, but there are several stories worth the read; funny, frustrating, sad, etc. If you do not feel compelled to purchase the book, at least borrow it from the library. You'll decide which stories hit you, and which do not.