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by Eileen M Pearlman,Jill Alison Ganon
Download Raising Twins: What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them) fb2
Home Improvement & Design
  • Author:
    Eileen M Pearlman,Jill Alison Ganon
  • ISBN:
    0062736809
  • ISBN13:
    978-0062736802
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    William Morrow Paperbacks; 1 edition (May 3, 2000)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Home Improvement & Design
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1689 kb
  • ePUB format
    1464 kb
  • DJVU format
    1748 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    613
  • Formats:
    lrf doc rtf mbr


In Raising Twins, coauthors Eileen M. Pearlman, P. herself an identical twin) and Jill Alison Ganon present a guidebook that studies the unique development of multiples from toddlerhood through young adulthood, paying close attention to the special challenges twins face.

In Raising Twins, coauthors Eileen M. The first quarter of the book contrasts the cognitive, emotional, and physical development of multiples against that of singletons, touching on topics like speech, socializing, peer pressure, and the journey toward independence.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Raising Twins: What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them) as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Raising Twins: What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Pearlman, Eileen, 1939-; Ganon, Jill Alison, 1952 .

Pearlman, Eileen, 1939-; Ganon, Jill Alison, 1952-.

Raising Twins: What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them). by Eileen M. Pearlman and Jill Alison Ganon. We hope you enjoy getting to know these twins as much as we enjoyed our meetings with them. While our approach is developmental, this is a topic-driven book.

Raising Twins guides you through the physical, emotional, and cognitive developmental differences and challenges specific to twins. Eileen M. She is the director of Twinsight, which provides counseling, workshops, and seminars to multiples and their families, and lives in Los Angeles.

Raising Twins What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them) by Eileen M. Pearlman; Jill Alison Ganon and Publisher It Books. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780062038296, 006203829X. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780062736802, 0062736809.

If you want NextDay, we can save the other items for later. 25 photos throughout. Yes-Save my other items for later. No-I want to keep shopping. Raising Twins guides you through the physical, emotional, and cognitive developmental differences and challenges specific to twins. Straightforward and reassuring, this book addresses the key issues that impact twins from babyhood all the way through adolescence: Sharing and comparisons. Competition and rivalry. The good twin/bad twin myth. Teen-specific issues like dating and applying for college. Compare similar products. Raising Twins: What Parents Want to Know (and What Twins Want to Tell Them) by Jill Alison Ganon, Eileen M. Pearlman (Paperback, 2000). Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Compare similar products. The New Contented Little Baby Book: The Secret to Calm and Confident Parenting by Gina Ford (Paperback, 2006).

Raising Twins guides you through the physical, emotional, and cognitive developmental differences and challenges specific to twins. Straightforward and reassuring, this book addresses the key issues that impact twins from babyhood all the way through adolescence:

Sharing and comparisons Competition and rivalryThe "secret language" of twinsThe good twin/bad twin mythTeen-specific issues like dating and applying for collegeAnd much more including lively, candid discussions with twins and their parents

Vudogal
This book is what I call "fluff". I did not get much out of it other then very light grazing the surface of many issues. Just filler.
Nuadabandis
I found a few points in this book helpful, but after you get though the first twenty pages it just repeats itself for the next two hundred or so pages. Not many parenting tips aside from treating you twins as individuals.
skriper
Very informative and lots of tips and useful strategies for raising twins.
Amis
I have 3.5 yr old fraternal twin girls and there wasn't anything partuicularly unique or interesting in this book. I have yet to find an illuminating book about raising healthy twins and the unique challenges of two siblings the exact same age.
SadLendy
it was ok....... for a new first time mother it needed more pictures and additional advice in another book, almost too much info for a new mom.
Kerahuginn
This isn't a bad book for parents of fraternal twins, but I found nothing in it that dealt with the issues that can arise with identical twins. I am still trying to find a book that deals more specifically with raising identicals.
Cel
This book has several things going for it, and one major strike against it.

* The "What Twins Want to Tell Them" subtitle refers to the numerous interviews with twins sprinkled throughout the book. I am reminded of a one-credit course I took on the politics of East Asia when I was in college. The course had a succession of guest speakers, and midway through the class, my classmates pointed out that we finally got one who was Asian. In other words, it's all well and good to hear from the "experts", but interviews with actual twins give a much-needed perspective.
* The book takes a developmental approach. For various ages, it first explains what a child can normally be expected to do at that particular age, then it revisits the topic to tell you how twins may differ. It sounds obvious, but I found this approach to be unique among the books I've read, and it was a really good way to understand what to expect.
* Tied in with the previous point, the book goes into a lot of detail to explain why twins need certain things. In my review of Double Duty, I questioned the advice not to refer to your kids as "the twins" and suggested it was not that different from referring to any set of siblings as "the kids". Raising Twins, on the other hand, explained that twins in particular struggle with differentiating themselves from their "co-twin", so it can be particularly important to use their individual names, in a way it might not for singleton siblings.
* The book addresses twin development all the way through high school, which is somewhat unusual for a book about twins. Most such books handle the first year, or the first few years, and, I suppose, assume that parents who survive that long can handle things for themselves. I was interested to read how the twin relationship continues to play a role, even for teenagers.

Alas, the last positive point is also a negative point. Because the book describes development spanning a period of eighteen years, there is very little about each specific age. If I wanted to know a lot about six-month-old twins (I do! I do!), there was just one tidbit, although a very interesting one. (Children at this age may start to use transitional objects to comfort themselves when separated from their mother. For a twin, this object may actually be his or her sibling.) I can't imagine lugging this book around for eighteen years, only to pull it out every six months and remember what advice it has at this point. For this reason, I cannot give the book my fullest endorsement.

Twinometer: 8/10.
The Pearlman book is quite good on many fronts, including the use of interviews with twins and parents and the dispelling of twin myths. The section on twin language and language acquisition is quite good, as are the sections on development of individual personalities. As with many such books, I found that I will need to read it again later as our daughters grow, but one of the merits of the book is that it does address issues of concern at many ages.

Several of the twin interviews seemed to be too short -- the interviewees likely had much more to say and while it would be tedious to read pages and pages unedited, doubling the length of many of them in the next edition would illustrate the points better.

On a minor issue, the book can be annoying in some places where pronoun use renders the passages confusing. Keeping the pronouns straight is especially important when an underlying theme is the complexity of relationships between twins themselves and with family members and other third parties.