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Download Atomic Home: A Guided Tour of the American Dream fb2

by Whitney Matheson
Download Atomic Home: A Guided Tour of the American Dream fb2
Home Improvement & Design
  • Author:
    Whitney Matheson
  • ISBN:
    1888054891
  • ISBN13:
    978-1888054897
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Collectors Press (April 1, 2004)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Home Improvement & Design
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1612 kb
  • ePUB format
    1151 kb
  • DJVU format
    1433 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    361
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf doc txt


With more than 350 images of 1950s and 1960s home decor  . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Atomic Home: A Guided Tour of the American Dream. by. Whitney Matheson.

From the glory days of linoleum and wood paneling to innovations in dishwashers, ovens, and washing machines, ATOMIC HOME: A GUIDED TOUR OF THE AMERICAN DREAM. Take Me Home, Atomic Home! By Thriftbooks. com User, January 8, 2009. Love it! Great little book with loads of fun facts and pictures. Great Baby-Boomer gift, too! Relive some of the best of the 1950's - 1960's in living color!

Atomic Home: A Guided Tour of the American DreamPaperback.

Atomic Home: A Guided Tour of the American DreamPaperback. Better Homes and Gardens. Although some of the items pictured are indeed dated, (aluminum cookware, for example - which has recently been connected to the creation Alzheimer's Disease in many individuals), very much more of the pictured items seem as good, (or often, much better!) than more "modern" products offered by manufacturers today!

An American Dream (AAD) (1965) is Norman Mailer's fourth novel. It was published by Dial Press.

An American Dream (AAD) (1965) is Norman Mailer's fourth novel. Mailer wrote it in serialized form for Esquire, consciously attempting to resurrect the methodology used by Charles Dickens and other earlier novelists, with Mailer writing each chapter against monthly deadlines. The book is written in a poetic style heavy with metaphor that creates unique and hypnotising narrative and dialogue.

The American dream was a trajectory to a promising future, a model for the .

The American dream was a trajectory to a promising future, a model for the United States and for the whole world. In a book published in 1954, Peter Marshall, former chaplain of the United States Senate, defined the American Dream with spiritually resounding words: Religious liberty to worship God according to the dictates of one’s own conscience and equal opportunity for all men, he said, are the twin pillars of the American Dream. The term began to be used extensively in the 1960s. To the contrary, in a 2015 book Home: How Habitat Made Us Human, the neuroanthropologist John S. Allen wrote, We humans are a species of homebodies.

American Dream is an expression often used to describe the vital ideals of the US population in both the material and spiritual senses. The American dream is the ideal of freedom and opportunity, the spiritual power of the nation. If the American system is a skeleton of US policy, the American dream is its soul. The source of the phrase American Dream is considered to be The Epic of America (1931), historical treatise by James Adams written during the Great Depression. James Adams encouraged his compatriots and reminded them of the purpose of America and its achievements.

According to critic and theatre practitioner Martin Esslin, The American Dream marked the beginning of the American absurdist drama.

The American Dream is the right for each person to pursue his or her own idea of happiness. To the drafters of the Declaration, the American Dream could only thrive if it were not hindered by taxation without representation

The American Dream is the right for each person to pursue his or her own idea of happiness. Its history, from the Declaration of Independence. To the drafters of the Declaration, the American Dream could only thrive if it were not hindered by taxation without representation.  Kings, military rulers, or tyrants shouldn’t decide taxes and other laws. The people should have the right to elect officials to represent them.

The American Dream is one of the most familiar and resonant phrases in our national lexicon, so familiar that we seldom pause to ask its origin, its history, or what it actually means. In this fascinating short history, Jim Cullen explores the meaning of the American Dream, or rather the several American Dreams that have both reflected and shaped American identity from the Pilgrims to the present

The American Dream was aided by a number of factors that gave the United States a competitive advantage over other . The idea of the American Dream has much deeper roots

The American Dream was aided by a number of factors that gave the United States a competitive advantage over other countries. Homeownership and education are often seen as paths to achieving the American Dream. The idea of the American Dream has much deeper roots. Its tenets can be found in the Declaration of Independence, which states: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. In a society based on these principles, an individual can live life to its fullest as he or she defines it.

From the glory days of linoleum and wood paneling to innovations in dishwashers, ovens, and washing machines, ATOMIC HOME: A GUIDED TOUR OF THE AMERICAN DREAM remembers the fads, fashions, and inventions of the postwar American dream home. With the war over, soldiers returned home to an unprecedented time of prosperity; the family home, with its white picket fence, became the status quo. Suburbs boomed and keeping up with the Joneses became a way of life for wives and weekend home-improvement warriors. Brimming with vintage illustrated advertisements depicting the "latest" in furniture, bathroom designs, and much more, ATOMIC HOME offers cultural commentary and design inspirations for an era that defined the modern family dwelling.

Cordantrius
This book was what I like to call a "quick fire" book. Someone gathered some great vingtage photos together and spent all of 20 minutes writing he content and then zipped it off to the publisher for a quick buck. There is very little content but the picures are nostalgic. I would only recommend this to someone building a library on this type of subject matter. There are far better books, see other reviews on this book for recommnedations.
Jogrnd
Missing many pages.
greatest
Great book, perfectly as described and in good condition.
Uthergo
I saw this title on the publisher's website and it seemed just my kind of book, a strong visual history/nostalgia survey of the white middle-class suburbs in the fifties.

Now, having looked through it several times I find it rather disappointing, it is a very superficial look at the Fifties home. Each room in the house has a chapter plus one each for: Outdoors maintenance and Backyard recreation. The chapters start with a few hundred words introduction then the following pages are ad illustrations and short bits of text that strangely don't really relate to the images on the page. A lot of the illustrations have been cropped from ads and in many cases could have been a lot bigger than they appear.

This publisher's books generally have colored backgrounds to the pages and in this title the background motif are colored strips, on many pages these get as much space as the illustrations which I feel is rather unnecessary, especially where an ad has been reduced too much in size and the text is not readable.

I recently bought a similar book: Going Home to the Fifties which also used illustrations from ads for each room in the house. Like 'Atomic Home' it was a rather generalised view of the times but of the two books I think it is the better one and it certainly has a lot more text, even though set in a large type face as if produced for school use. For a better look at homes of the period I can really recommend Inspiring Interiors from Armstrong 1950s this has hundreds of photos of room sets, created for Armstrong Flooring ads that ran in the big consumer magazines of the period. These rooms reflected a middle-class life style and nicely, the flooring in the photos does not overpower the rest of the room. The other book that covers the period beautifully is All-American Ads of the 50s an amazing 960 pages of ads, all beautifully reproduced, and the chapter on the home (Consumer Products and Interiors) has 218 ad pages.

'Atomic Home' is sort of a fun book but unfortunately doesn't come up to expectations so I am still waiting for the coffee-table title about life in the fifties suburbs.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
Sironynyr
Came in good condition
Duzshura
Love it! Great little book with loads of fun facts and pictures. Great Baby-Boomer gift, too! Relive some of the best of the 1950's - 1960's in living color! Buy it, you'll love it!