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Download McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers fb2

by Maggie Stuckey
Download McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers fb2
Gardening & Landscape Design
  • Author:
    Maggie Stuckey
  • ISBN:
    0761116230
  • ISBN13:
    978-0761116233
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Workman Publishing Company (February 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    448 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Gardening & Landscape Design
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1355 kb
  • ePUB format
    1419 kb
  • DJVU format
    1661 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    710
  • Formats:
    doc lrf lrf lit


I just wanted a book to help me out with my vegetable gardening goals

Armed with this manual, frustrated apartment dwellers can indulge their passion for growing edible things. I just wanted a book to help me out with my vegetable gardening goals. I'm working with raised container gardens and some pots on my deck, and yet I have kind of unrealistically ambitious plans. Turns out I"m not so unrealistic as I thought!

vegetables, herbs, small fruits, and edible flowers to create a plant-style . .articulating a particular point of view

vegetables, herbs, small fruits, and edible flowers to create a plant-style .McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits. 81 MB·233 Downloads·New! seasoned container gardeners and writers, The Bountiful Container covers Vegetables-. Planting Plans for Your Kitchen Garden: How to Create a Vegetable, Herb and Fruit Garden in Easy. articulating a particular point of view. Chetan Bhagat's books do both and more. Rahman, in TIME magazine, on Che. Load more similar PDF files.

seasoned container gardeners and writers, The Bountiful Container . If I could recommend one book for small-space vegetable gardening, this would be it. Andrea.

seasoned container gardeners and writers, The Bountiful Container covers Vegetables-. Bountiful bonsai : create instant indoor container gardens with edible fruits, herbs and flowers. 132 Pages·2014·8 Planting Plans for Your Kitchen Garden: How to Create a Vegetable, Herb and Fruit Garden in Easy. 84 MB·8,983 Downloads·New! into a productive paradise with modular planting plans for simple beds of vegetables, herbs, fruit.

McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container book. Written by two seasoned container gardeners and writers, The Bountiful Container covers Vegetables-not just tomatoes (17 varieties) and peppers (19 varieties), butharicots verts, fava beans, Thumbelina carrots, Chioggia beets, and sugarsnap peas. Herbs, from basil to thyme, and including bay leaves, fennel, and saffron crocus. Edible Flowers, such as begonias, calendula, pansies, violets, and roses.

McGEE & STUCKEY’S. The BOUNTIFUL CONTAINER. A Container Garden of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers . ROSE MARIE NICHOLS McGEE and MAGGIE STUCKEY. Illustrations by Michael A. Hill. Workman publishing, new york . Time spent working in your garden will not be deducted from your life. In one sense, every gardener who came before us played a role in this book, for the knowledge passed down through time from person to person is the core of every garden book ever written. We acknowledge, with respect, our debt to them all. Three specific individuals are owed profound thanks for their help in this project.

McGee and Stuckey's Bountiful Container : Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and . There's an extensive section on herbs (each herb gets its own mini chapter) and popular vegetables and fruits.

McGee and Stuckey's Bountiful Container : Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers. by Maggie Stuckey and Rose Marie Nichols McGee. Best of all, it makes container gardening seem like a very enjoyable hobby. I was very inspired by the writers and have successfully started herbs and squash from seed. Before that, I had killed just about every transplant flower or herb I've ever bought.

Fruits and Edible Flowers by Maggie Stuckey - Really Neat Book About Growing Edibles In Small Spaces.

McGeeStuckeys Bountiful Container Create Container Gardens of Vegetables Herbs Fruits and Edible Flowers by Maggie Stuckey Really Neat Book About Growing Edibles In Small Spaces download. File name: McGeeStuckeys Bountiful Container Create Container Gardens of Vegetables Herbs Fruits and Edible Flowers by Maggie Stuckey - Really Neat Book About Growing Edibles In Small Spaces.

Download McGee & Stuckeys Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of. 4 years ago by Foreverloving in Books EBooks.

Download McGee & Stuckeys Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers or any other file from Books category.

Giriş Yap. Gardening Enthusiasts. McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits, and Edible Flowers. McGee & Stuckey's Bountiful Container: Create Container Gardens of Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits

Rose Marie Nichols McGee.

Rose Marie Nichols McGee. Description: With few exceptions-such as corn and pumpkins-everything edible that's grown in a traditional garden can be raised in a container.

With few exceptions-such as corn and pumpkins-everything edible that's grown in a traditional garden can be raised in a container. And with only one exception-watering-container gardening is a whole lot easier. Beginning with the down-to-earth basics of soil, sun and water, fertilizer, seeds and propagation, The Bountiful Container is an extraordinarily complete, plant-by-plant guide.Written by two seasoned container gardeners and writers, The Bountiful Container covers Vegetables-not just tomatoes (17 varieties) and peppers (19 varieties), butharicots verts, fava beans, Thumbelina carrots, Chioggia beets, and sugarsnap peas. Herbs, from basil to thyme, and including bay leaves, fennel, and saffron crocus. Edible Flowers, such as begonias, calendula, pansies, violets, and roses. And perhaps most surprising, Fruits, including apples, peaches, Meyer lemons, blueberries, currants, and figs-yes, even in the colder parts of the country. (Another benefit of container gardening: You can bring the less hardy perennials in over the winter.) There are theme gardens (an Italian cook's garden, a Four Seasons garden), lists of sources, and dozens of sidebars on everything from how to be a human honeybee to seeds that are All America Selections.

Love Me
The Bountiful Container is a gardener's gem. The focus is on the world of containerized edibles - fruits, herbs, flowers and vegetables. It is encyclopedic in nature, yet written and designed in a very user friendly style. It is well-organized and full of quotes and sketches, making it easy to dive in anywhere. The advice is thorough, interesting and clearly the product of experience. This book is perfect reading during the cold months of winter - the gardener's down time. Not everyone has space for a full garden, but almost everyone can come up with a small space or even a windowsill for a container garden. And even with garden space, I really enjoy the look and function of containers. Many seed suppliers have curated collections of vegetables that grow beautifully in containers. Order this book along with a few seed catalogs, pick out some seeds and be inspired.
funike
I am in love with this book. I just wanted a book to help me out with my vegetable gardening goals. I'm working with raised container gardens and some pots on my deck, and yet I have kind of unrealistically ambitious plans. Turns out I"m not so unrealistic as I thought! I almost bought a different book, but one of the reviews of THAT book told me to buy this book. I took a chance---so glad I did. I find this book to be very well-organized, practical, pleasant to look at, and included just enough information (and the stuff I wanted/needed to know). On the spectrum of gardeners, I'm somewhere between beginner and intermediate. I'm so excited about my garden's potential this year thanks to this book!
Sudert
I have grown herbs and many kinds of veggies in containers for years, enjoy doing so and learning more. So many container gardening books are about containers--really cool objects used as pots happened upon at, say, a second-hand shop. This is not that kind of book. This book covers a broad range of topics (yes, containers), but mostly particular varieties of plants the two authors have had success with, keeping the soil healthy, a few recipes, a few line drawings, seasonal and geographic variables. The book is a tiny bit quirky in that every so often the individual voices of the authors come through if their experiences are different. The book is not dry and encyclopedic but rather full of good advice and the shared experience of two people who clearly like to grow all kinds of things in pots. For example, I never considered apple trees. The authors let the reader know what the possibilities are and what would preclude this as a good idea for some places.
The Rollers of Vildar
I am very careful to read reviews before I purchase almost anything on Amazon, and this book was no exception. I worried about the compatibility of their suggestions of different plants in the same container. I looked on Google to see snippets of the book. I have never done much (really, any) gardening before.

I purchased the book originally in paperback, and then several months later, when it became available for my Kindle for a steal of about $2. I tell everyone about it. I gave my original copy away to another apartment-dweller. I have memorized some of the sections, practically.

And it's incredible. When I went shopping for soil, I found that the Miracle Gro Orangic Potting Soil for Container Veggies and Fruits had the ingredients these ladies DIDN'T recommend, and hardly any of the ones it did. I bought new potting soil for WAY cheaper, and my plants promptly popped out of their seeds. I listened to their pot recommendations, and LOVED the fact that it gave specific information on depth requirements for each plant. I have carrots, snap peas, lettuce, kale, New Zealand Spinach, potatoes, and a lemon tree all flourishing (relatively) on my patio. And I wouldn't have been able to do it without this book. To top it all off, I bought the vast majority of my seeds from McGee's family's Nichols Garden Nursery, and not only do they have the best seed strains and prices I could find anywhere online (disease-resistance is key!), they gave me a free seed packet! I have enough seeds to last me 5 years.

I found their suggestions regarding light, fertilizer, soil, buying seeds, pot selection, disease, planting (either by seed or by transplant) all invaluable, and after all this you still have 75% of the book left to look up specific information on individual plants. And in these individual sections, their experience comes across in a big way. The only problem I've found thus far was with sprouting snap peas, but that was it(I discovered wrapping them in wet paper towel and then placing the wet-towel bundle in an open plastic bag pre-sprouted my seeds perfectly).

I grow most of my plants in reusable grocery bags, the kind you get from the grocery store for about a dollar. I don't have a drill, so that somewhat limits my ability to capitalize on their encouragement to turn just about anything into a pot. With the bags, I just snip some holes in the bottom (and maybe bottom of the sides), fill with soil, plant, and that's it.