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by David I. Kertzer
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  • Author:
    David I. Kertzer
  • ISBN:
    0618224424
  • ISBN13:
    978-0618224425
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (November 15, 2004)
  • Pages:
    357 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1730 kb
  • ePUB format
    1450 kb
  • DJVU format
    1490 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    930
  • Formats:
    doc lrf mobi docx


When the senile, power-mad and apparently manic-depressive pope rejected this arrangement, Italian troops seized power in Rome and Pius IX sought refuge in the Vatican palaces, declaring himself a prisoner. Led by Giuseppe Garibaldi and his army of "Red Shirts" and aided by France, the nationalists finally gained complete control in 1878.

Based on a wealth of documents long buried in the Vatican archives, Prisoner of the Vatican tells the story of the Church's secret attempt to block the unification of Italy and seize control not in ancient times.

Based on a wealth of documents long buried in the Vatican archives, Prisoner of the Vatican tells the story of the Church's secret attempt to block the unification of Italy and seize control not in ancient times, but in the late nineteenth century. For more than fifty years, the pope was a self-imposed prisoner within the Vatican walls, planning to flee Italy, to return only as the restored ruler of Rome and the Papal States

Аудиокнига "Prisoner of the Vatican: The Popes' Secret Plot to Capture Rome from the New Italian State", David I. Kertzer. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "Prisoner of the Vatican: The Popes' Secret Plot to Capture Rome from the New Italian State", David I. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Prisoner of the Vatican book. I found this book very interesting and informative about the creation of the Italian State, and its struggle with the Popes who still wanted temporal power over Rome and the Papal States.

Prisoner of the Vatican book. The book primarily deals with the long reigns of Pius IX and Leo XIII. At the end I wanted more, and expected more on the Papacy leading up to the Lateran Pacts (discussed in an Epilogue). Kertzer's subsequent book on the Popes and Mussolini will I hope cover the rest of the story.

Rome from the new Italian state, David I. Italians-but also others who learn about Italian history today-are led to believe that the nation was securely established once Rome was taken in 1870. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references (. and index. But it is an illusion, the product of a natural tendency to view history backward.

In this riveting chronicle of international intrigue, the renowned historian David Kertzer delves into secret Vatican archives to reveal a venomous conflict that kept the pope a self-imposed prisoner of the Vatican for more than fifty years. King Victor Emmanuel, his nemesis Garibaldi, the French emperor Napoleon III, England, Spain, Germany, Austria, and even America play a part in this astonishing drama.

David I. Kertzer is the author of, among other books, Prisoner of the Vatican, The Popes Against the Jews, and The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara, winner of the National Jewish Book Award and a finalist for the National Book Award. He is provost of Brown University and professor of anthropology and Italian studies.

A prisoner in the Vatican or prisoner of the Vatican (Italian: Prigioniero del Vaticano; Latin: Captivus Vaticani) is how Pope Pius IX was described following the capture of Rome by the armed forces of the Kingdom of Italy on 20 September 1870

A prisoner in the Vatican or prisoner of the Vatican (Italian: Prigioniero del Vaticano; Latin: Captivus Vaticani) is how Pope Pius IX was described following the capture of Rome by the armed forces of the Kingdom of Italy on 20 September 1870.

Prisoner of the Vatican is the story of the conquest of the Papal state by the Italian . It wasn't until 1929 and the Lateran Pacts between the Pope at the time and Mussolini, that any talk of trying to regain the Papal.

Prisoner of the Vatican is the story of the conquest of the Papal state by the Italian government and the creation of the Vatican. Pope Pius IX was a piece of work and an opponent of everything modern. I liked it so much I bought two other books by this author which I plan to get to before the month is over. The author, David I. Kertzer, knows his stuff. It wasn't until 1929 and the Lateran Pacts between the Pope at the time and Mussolini, that any talk of trying to regain the Papal States was dropped. Definitely recommended for history readers.

Prisoner of the Vatican looks deep into the workings of the Church in its final bid to regain the pope's temporal power.

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Prisoner of the Vatican looks deep into the workings of the Church in its final bid to regain the pope's temporal power. Kertzer sweeps readers along with riveting, revelatory panache. No one who reads his new book will ever think of Italy, or the Vatican, in quite the same way again. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Draws on previously unknown documents from the Vatican archives to detail a late-nineteenth-century plot on the part of Pope Pius IX and his successor, Leo XIII, to block the unification of Italy and to seize control of Rome and the Papal States, in a colorful history marked by such key individuals as the two pontiffs, Italy's national hero Garibaldi, King Victor Emmanuel, and France's Napoleon III.

Funky
A "prequel" to Kertzer's later opus about the Pope ad Mussolini. As prisoner of the Vatican, Pius IX and his successors caused Italy (and other European states) to recognize the advantages of the separation of church and state. An interesting book and one that should be of interest to those history buffs (like me) who remember he days of Mussolini and the fall of Italy in WWII. I fount the book to e extremely fascinating.
Wenes
After the French Revolution, a fault line ran through Italy. On one side was the Medieval Papacy and its temporal power, on the other, the movement for a modern nation state. In 1848, the earth quaked. Filled with colorful characters, vividly drawn, this dramatic story is superbly told. A must read.
Nirn
Prisoner of the Vatican: The End of the Papal Monarchy

David I. Kertzer is Paul Dupee, Jr. University Professor of Social Science at Brown University and is the author of ten books on various aspects of Italian 19th- and 20th-century history. Two of his books, "The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara" and "The Popes Against the Jews," treat relationships between Italian Catholics and Jews in the 19th and 20th centuries. This work, "Prisoner of the Vatican," recounts the acrimonious relationship between the Holy See and the newly unified kingdom of Italy during the period from Italy's annexation of the Papal States in 1870 until the two adversaries settled their differences in Mussolini's Lateran Treaty of 1929, establishing Vatican City as an independent state.

Contrary to the popular conception of history, the Middle Ages didn't end with the Renaissance in Italy. They lasted until September 20, 1870, when according to Professor Kertzer "Europe's last theocratic government was ended." Kertzer writes that "Modern Italy was founded... over the dead body of Pope Pius IX."

Much has been written of Italian history but very little has been accessible in English dealing with the history of the Italian state. Professor Kertzer, given entry to freshly opened Vatican archives, tells a riveting tale of the political intrigues, international back-room deals, skullduggery and corrupt characters operating on both sides of the conflict.

"Prisoner of the Vatican," based on a copious amount of support documentation, is an historian's account of the Roman Catholic Church's covert attempts to subvert the unification of Italy and retain control of its medieval fiefdom known as the "Papal States," not in ancient times but in the final decades of the nineteenth century. For the fifty years following the seizure of Rome and its adjacent territories (that is, nearly all of central Italy as far north as Bologna) by the newborn Italian state, the Supreme Pontiff was a self-sequestered prisoner within the malarial fog of Vatican City, planning to flee Italy and with foreign military help return as the restored ruler of a full third of the Italian peninsula.

During this time, a fragile Kingdom of Italy was besieged from within and without. At the same time Italian, European and Church history changed forever when the pope had himself declared infallible by a Vatican Council. "Prisoner of the Vatican" takes a penetrating look deep into the workings of the Church in its final failure to reestablish the pope's territorial authority.

In 1870, recognizing the pivotal role played by Catholicism in Italian life and anxious to reach an honorable accommodation with the pontiff, Victor Emmanuel II sought an agreement with Pius IX in which the pope would rule the Tiber's right bank ("the Leonine City") while the king would govern the left bank from what was to become the Italian capital. When the senile, power-mad and apparently manic-depressive pope rejected this arrangement, Italian troops seized power in Rome and Pius IX sought refuge in the Vatican palaces, declaring himself a prisoner. Led by Giuseppe Garibaldi and his army of "Red Shirts" and aided by France, the nationalists finally gained complete control in 1878.

Pius IX repeatedly and publicly advertised his hatred for democracy, free speech and a free press, religious pluralism and other modernizing political forces sweeping Europe in the mid-19th century, and for good reason: a united secular Italy, the dream of Garibaldi and his legions, could only witness the end of papal power and Pius counted as a great blasphemy the modern notion that "Church and state should be separate." A Vatican-inspired and funded campaign of intrigues, assassination attempts on opposing leaders, and soliciting the intervention of France and Austria against the Italian government was initiated and even as such attempts invariably failed, the Vatican promulgated a new doctrine, one that in the end would contribute to its political undoing: that of "papal infallibility."

Vatican scheming against the Italian state continued well after Pius's death, and it was not until after the first World War that a pope lifted the ban against Catholics' serving in Italy's parliament or even voting: The animosity between the pope and the state continued until 1929, when Mussolini and the Vatican signed the Lateran Treaty in which the Vatican recognized the legitimacy of the fascist Italian state and was in turn granted the rights of sovereignty and the stipulation that Catholicism be Italy's sole and official religion.

Professor Kertzer sweeps readers along with a riveting, revelatory and very readable tale. No one who reads "Prisoner of the Vatican" will ever think of Italy, or the Vatican, in quite the same way again.

If the book has any fault at all, it is in the deprecating of the role of Giuseppe Garibaldi and his "Red Shirt" legions as agents of change. In Kertzer's view, the battle for Rome was a trifurcated one, with the sides comprising the King and government of Italy, the pope and his retinue led by a truly fiendish Cardinal Antonelli, and an unpredictable Garibaldi and his followers constituting a "loose cannon" on the field of battle. This reviewer would also liked to have seen more attention given to the role played by Italy's Freemasonry movement - which was very considerable - in the demise of papal dictatorship and the birth of the new unified Italian state. Moreover, Professor Kertzer ends his book with a peculiar couple of paragraphs so anomalous in light of the pattern of facts presented as to seem quite an odd and unreasonable conclusion.

Nonetheless, "Prisoner of the Vatican" is an excellent book, beautifully and engagingly written and very complete in both scope and depth. I strongly recommend it to all students of Italian and Catholic Church history.
Gugrel
Good book. Gave me a new perspective on 19th/early 20th century European affairs. It was particularly instructive regarding the background of the rise of Fascism. I hope to read more by this author.
santa
Interesting history. Who knew?
Yla
A complicated tale.
Wnex
Very detailed and a little repetitive. The author could have told the entire fascinating story in half as many words.
amazingly detailed tour of Vatican diplomacy fighting Italy to keep rome from being the capital of a united Italy..