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by Suzanne Strempek Shea
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  • Author:
    Suzanne Strempek Shea
  • ISBN:
    0807072249
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807072240
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Beacon Press; First Edition, 1st Printing edition (April 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    324 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1128 kb
  • ePUB format
    1397 kb
  • DJVU format
    1235 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    509
  • Formats:
    docx rtf doc azw


'Sundays in America is unlike any other book you’ll ever read.

'Sundays in America is unlike any other book you’ll ever read. While born and raised Roman Catholic, Suzanne Shea invites us to accompany her on a yearlong pilgrimage of weekly services in non-Catholic Christian churches. Her book is remarkable! Readers accompany Shea on each leg of her journey: from a rousing Baptist service in Harlem to a chapel at Denver International Airport. Stops in between include a silent Quaker service in Philadelphia, and a visit to Joel Osteen's megachurch in Houston.

Sundays in America book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. When Pope John Paul II died, Suzanne Strempek Shea, who had not.

When Pope John Paul II died, Suzanne Strempek Shea, who had not been an active member of a church community for .

When Pope John Paul II died, Suzanne Strempek Shea, who had not been an active member of a church community for some years. I'm not arguing that Suzanne Strempek Shea claims Mark Twain, Walt Whitman or Jack Kerouac status with this book - but she's a fascinating memoirist in that noble tradition. This book takes us from New York to Hawaii - and from Texas to the last holdout of Shaker worship in Maine. Truth be told - I didn't have time for this book, but I opened the morning mail and was lost for the next 2 hours! I kept coming back to this book, again and again, as a first choice among a stack of urgent reading.

Sundays in America does for us what most of us cannot do for ourselves: it puts us in the pews of dozens of churches all across America as. .I can think of no better companion on a spiritual journey than Suzanne Strempek Shea.

Sundays in America does for us what most of us cannot do for ourselves: it puts us in the pews of dozens of churches all across America as an 'inside outsider' to contemporary Christianity. This book is for anyone looking to understand, evaluate, or reignite their Christian faith through the prism of curiosity and the spirit of exploration.

Home Browse Books Book details, Sundays in America: A Yearlong Road Trip i.By Suzanne Strempek Shea. When Pope John Paul II died, Suzanne Strempek Shea, who had not been an active member of a church community for some years, recognized in his mourners a faith-filled passion that she longed to recapture in her own life. So she set out on a pilgrimage to visit a different church every Sunday for one year-a journey that would take her through the broad spectrum of contemporary Protestant Christianity practiced in this country.

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Suzanne Strempek Shea is a master storyteller whose non-fiction is as creative and imaginative as her novels. Sundays in America" is not only a wonderful book, it is a soulful pilgrimage that lifts you up, causes you reflect, makes you laugh, moves you to tears, even leads you to pray. I was eagerly looking forward to reading this book and it lived up to my expectations. The idea of visiting one church a week for a year is daunting, considering the preparation and travel involved.

In her book Sundays in America, Suzanne Strempek Shea discusses a yearlong pilgrimage, during which she . That revelation inspired a yearlong pilgrimage: Shea decided to visit a different Christian church every Sunday for a year, beginning on an Easter Sunday.

In her book Sundays in America, Suzanne Strempek Shea discusses a yearlong pilgrimage, during which she visited a different Christian church every Sunday. The journey took her from her New England home to the West Coast to the Deep South to the Midwest. In her new book, Sundays in America, Shea chronicles her journey, which took her through the broad spectrum of contemporary Christianity, from her New England home to the West Coast to the Deep South to the Midwest.

At the end of the year, Suzanne Strempek Shea has been all over the map .

At the end of the year, Suzanne Strempek Shea has been all over the map, both literally (even visiting Hawaii) and in denominational terms. This book, detailing the author's visits during a yearlong journey, every weekend, to a different Christian church around the . Sundays in America is an essential guide for those seeking a new house for their worship as well as a colorful road trip for the armchair explorer, providing a vivid perspective on the practice and meaning of Christian faith as it is practiced throughout our land.

When Pope John Paul II died, Suzanne Strempek Shea, who had not been an active member of a church community for some years, recognized in his mourners a faith-filled passion that she longed to recapture in her own life. Shea, never one to do things in a conventional manner or by halves, set out on a pilgrimage to visit a different church every Sunday for a year-a journey that would take her through the broad spectrum of contemporary protestant Christianity practiced in this country.She began with a rousing Baptist Easter service in Harlem, traveled to Colorado's Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame for a sing-along service at the Cowboy Church, and flew to Houston for a multimedia experience at Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church, the largest church in the country. She sat with the Shakers, and-in silence-with the Quakers; she sang often, danced, and even drew on one memorable occasion. Shea approached each congregation with the curiosity of a newcomer and with respect for each unique expression of faith, whether the sanctuary was a multimillion-dollar extravaganza, a centuries-old edifice, an abandoned building, or even an airport chapel.In her tour of more than thirty states, including Hawaii, Shea: * Knocked knees with President Jimmy Carter at his Plains, Georgia, Baptist church on Independence Day. * Joined the band at a San Francisco African Orthodox church that considers jazz legend John Coltrane a bona fide saint. * Got a wake-up call from Anne Graham Lotz, Billy Graham's preacher daughter, at a sprawling conservative church in South Carolina. * Followed the signs for a hot tub dealership that, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, has become a new Presbyterian church in Mississippi. * Collected tips on The Purpose Driven Life from Rick Warren at his famed Saddleback Church complex. * Knocked on the door of the Jehovah's Witnesses in Portland, Oregon. * Shared a pew with Milwaukee Bucks star Michael Redd at the Columbus, Ohio, church he purchased for his dad. * Had her feet washed by a Seventh-Day Adventist at a church in Connecticut. * Attended a three-hour service featuring speaking in tongues, faith healing, and dancing in the aisle at a Foursquare Gospel church. * Toured Joseph Smith's birthplace in Vermont and worshipped with his Mormon followers.Sundays in America is an essential guide for those seeking a new house for their worship as well as a colorful road trip for the armchair explorer, providing a vivid perspective on the practice and meaning of Christian faith as it is practiced throughout our land.

Manarius
The writing in this book is lovely, with a flow and smoothness that warm the heart. But it stops the reader dead in his tracks when the author makes no qualms about declaring that Christianity is wonderful as long as it's not mainstream, white or advocating traditional values. Apparently it's not ok to differentiate between right and wrong! I did not finish the book (borrowed from the library) after realizing what her theme was. Too bad!
Bearus
This is a sometimes-interesting read by a rather bored (or jaded?) Catholic writer in search of a more fulfilling church. The writing is not bad, and there is some good information for people who have ever wondered what other American church-goers are experiencing each weekend. The author only visits congregations that would have some claim to greater Christianity, including those as diverse as the Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Unitarians, Adventists, Mennonites and others. Celebrity-type churches are also attended during the one-year project, including those made famous by Rick Warren, Joel Osteen, Jeremiah Wright and President Jimmy Carter.

In her quest for the ideal church. the author is most satisfied with churches that emphasize social-justice, multi-culturalism, and an emotional/spiritual "feel-good" experience. She also values art and decoration in her perfect worship setting. From my reading, I didn't think Shea is very interested in issues such as the Biblical truth, accurate teaching of Scripture, evangelism, or the importance of living for Christ. Where many Christians seek ways to please God, the writer seems more intent on finding a place where God can please her. Shea seems to desire a church where "tolerance" is a key virtue, but she can be rather intolerant herself of preachers who espouse traditional church values.

Ms. Shea hails from Massachusetts, and fully one-half of the churches reviewed are in greater New England/New York/eastern Pennsylvania (including five in the New York City Metro area). Only about a quarter of the churches were west of the Mississippi. The reader slowly becomes aware that Ms. Shea prefers her Christianity on the liberal side. One Seattle church that promotes traditonal "man + woman" marriage is criticized for "hammering out hate". The very next Sunday, President Obama's former church in Chicago equates shopping at Walmart as the moral equivalent of prostitution... earning an extra donation from the author. Shea also has a strange urge to mention the race or ethnicity of the people she encounters at most churches, which seems like an odd way to evaluate a given congregation.

Overall, I'm glad I read this book. The author does her homework, and I did learn a few things along the way. Many evangelicals and fundamentalists would argue with Shea's Christian outlook, however she never claims to be completely objective in her observations. The writer and I might see God in different lights, but I do appreciate that she took time to personally experience multiple dimensions of American Christianity and share them with the rest of us.
Dakora
The best spiritual stories are the stories of people all around us -- what journalists like to call "real people," as if media professionals normally exist in a realm of plastic replicas. And, perhaps that's the problem with a lot of what passes for American media, these days, isn't it?

Writing as a journalist for more than 30 years, as someone who has circled the globe and also poked around America's most obscure corners -- I understand how rare this kind of book project truly is. As much of American media shrinks, resources to undertake major projects like this year-long pilgrimage through our quirky religious landscape are growing scarcer with each passing year.

And yet -- this kind of pursuit is what defined our greatest writers.

I'm not arguing that Suzanne Strempek Shea claims Mark Twain, Walt Whitman or Jack Kerouac status with this book -- but she's a fascinating memoirist in that noble tradition. This book takes us from New York to Hawaii -- and from Texas to the last holdout of Shaker worship in Maine.

Truth be told -- I didn't have time for this book, but I opened the morning mail and was lost for the next 2 hours! I kept coming back to this book, again and again, as a first choice among a stack of urgent reading.

Here's an easy way to make your choice about this book. If you're a fan of NPR, enjoy Bill Moyers, occasionally chuckle along with Garrison Keillor -- and, especially, if you recall Charles Kuralt with a smile -- then buy this book.

A final tip: It's a great spring read as you're planning your summer, because you may find yourself jotting down details about some of her more intriguing stops.
Micelhorav
This was a book I had to keep reminding myself to slow down and savor - it's so engaging and so delicious - yet I kept wanting to read on and discover more. After all, this could not be a more timely topic. At a point in history when we are surrounded by spiritual starvation - people leaving churches in droves - and faced again and again with religious fundamentalism at home and abroad, Suzanne Strempek Shea's response is a personal one - she goes out and actively samples church services around the country, experiencing what they have to offer and asking herself if this is what it is all about, truly.

By the end of this book I felt I had not only traveled roads to outlandish and inspiring places, but I also felt I had reached a personal revelation of what spirituality could be, whether or not it was tied to a religion, a creed, or a parcel of dogma. As I read I was amused, astonished, and sometimes shocked by the types of worship she observed, and ultimately I had to admit I was profoundly moved by what she showed me about faith and belief. For when we witness others' faith, we allow our own to grow.

I cannot think of a book that is more relevant to spirituality today in the USA. I shall be giving copies to those friends I know who are sampling churches and chapels, looking for something that feels genuine.

We should be profoundly thankful for this book.

Allan Hunter
Author of "Stories We Need To Know: Reading Your Life Path in Literature'
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