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by Philip Jenkins
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  • Author:
    Philip Jenkins
  • ISBN:
    019531395X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195313956
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1st Edition edition (May 11, 2007)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1552 kb
  • ePUB format
    1605 kb
  • DJVU format
    1316 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    145
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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. What does the future hold for European Christianity? Is the Christian church doomed to collapse under the weight of globalization, Western secularism, and a flood of Muslim immigrants? Is Europe, in short, on th. .

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. What does the future hold for European Christianity? Is the Christian church doomed to collapse under the weight of globalization, Western secularism, and a flood of Muslim immigrants? Is Europe, in short, on the brink of becoming "e;Eurabia"e;? Though many pundits are loudly predicting just such a scenario, Philip Jenkins reveals the flaws in these arguments in God's Continent and offers a much more measured assessment of Europe's religious future.

God's Continent book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking God's Continent: Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking God's Continent: Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Philip Jenkins is an excellent guide as we think about Christianity, Islam, and secularism in 21st-century Eruope and . Seldom have I read a book with such an intellectual pleasure and lively interest as Jenkins' God's Continent

Philip Jenkins is an excellent guide as we think about Christianity, Islam, and secularism in 21st-century Eruope and in the world more generally. God's Continent is a seminal exploration of religious Europe by a prolific and insightful author. Present assessments and future claims about Europe will be markedly deficient without an awareness of Jenkins' contribution. Seldom have I read a book with such an intellectual pleasure and lively interest as Jenkins' God's Continent. Written in a clear style and supported by solid arguments it helps to understand the processes happening in Europe and the European world we live i. -Anthropos.

In God's Continent, Jenkins shows that Muslims are by no means the only new immigrants in Europe. Philip Jenkins is an excellent guide as we think about Christianity, Islam, and secularism in 21st-century Eruope and in the world more generally. Christians from Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe are also pouring into the Western countries, bringing with them a vibrant and enthusiastic faith that is helping to transform the face of European Christianity.

Jenkins agrees that both Christianity and Islam face real difficulties in surviving within Europe's secular culture. Philip Jenkins is Distinguished Professor of History and Religious Studies, Penn State University. But instead of fading away, both have adapted, and are adapting. Yes, the churches are in decline, but there are also clear indications that Christian loyalty and devotion survive, even as institutions crumble. He is the author of Dream Catchers: How Mainstream America Discovered Native Spirituality, Beyond Tolerance: Child Pornography and the Internet, and many other books. He lives in University Park, Pennsylvania.

God's Continent : Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 9 years ago. Jenkins' analysis of the state of Christianity and Islam in Europe is thorough and realistic. Although the subject matter is religion, the book is chock full of information and modern history, and yes, a little philosophical speculation.

God's Continent: Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis.

Philip Jenkins (born April 3, 1952) is a professor of history at Baylor University in the United States, and co-director for Baylor's Program on.God's Continent: Christianity, Islam, and Europe's Religious Crisis. New York: Oxford University Press.

Philip Jenkins (born April 3, 1952) is a professor of history at Baylor University in the United States, and co-director for Baylor's Program on Historical Studies of Religion in the Institute for Studies of Religion. He is also the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Pennsylvania State University (PSU)  .

Philip Jenkins Oxford 2007-05-11. Jenkins, professor of history and religious studies, Penn State University, takes a sober look at the reality of the religious scene in Europe.

Christianity, Islam, and Europe’s Religious Crisis. Philip Jenkins Oxford 2007-05-11. This book is a cornucopia of facts, statistics, trends, and analyses surrounding the new religious melting pot of Europe. His purpose is to answer whether Europe will become a future Eurabia, and he conditions the answer with a multitude of statistics on every side. Jenkins, a professor of history and religious studies at Penn State University, challenges the widespread notion that Christianity is dying out in Europe. Whereas most writers on the topic focus on declining Christian practices and relatively high birthrates among Muslims in Europe, Jenkins seeks to rebut the more extreme visions of a future Europe dominated by atheists or Islamists.

What does the future hold for European Christianity? Is the Christian church doomed to collapse under the weight of globalization, Western secularism, and a flood of Muslim immigrants? Is Europe, in short, on the brink of becoming "Eurabia"? Though many pundits are loudly predicting just such a scenario, Philip Jenkins reveals the flaws in these arguments in God's Continent and offers a much more measured assessment of Europe's religious future. While frankly acknowledging current tensions, Jenkins shows, for instance, that the overheated rhetoric about a Muslim-dominated Europe is based on politically convenient myths: that Europe is being imperiled by floods of Muslim immigrants, exploding Muslim birth-rates, and the demise of European Christianity. He points out that by no means are Muslims the only new immigrants in Europe. Christians from Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe are also pouring into the Western countries, and bringing with them a vibrant and enthusiastic faith that is helping to transform the face of European Christianity. Jenkins agrees that both Christianity and Islam face real difficulties in surviving within Europe's secular culture. But instead of fading away, both have adapted, and are adapting. Yes, the churches are in decline, but there are also clear indications that Christian loyalty and devotion survive, even as institutions crumble. Jenkins sees encouraging signs of continuing Christian devotion in Europe, especially in pilgrimages that attract millions--more in fact than in bygone "ages of faith." The third book in an acclaimed trilogy that includes The Next Christendom and The New Faces of Christianity, God's Continent offers a realistic and historically grounded appraisal of the future of Christianity in a rapidly changing Europe.

Gogul
"God's Continent" by Philip Jenkins contains an interesting thesis, which is that the condition of Christianity in Europe (the original home of Christendom) is not as bad as most people, especially conservative Christians, make it out to be. This is a most interesting conclusion in light of the meager church attendance in most European countries (with a few exceptions, such as Poland). Furthermore, with the influx of immigrants from the Islamic countries, it would seem that the dominant traditional religion will soon be Islam (although secularism might remain, as it is today, the religion of the masses).

As he has made clear in "The Next Christendom," Jenkins does not see a return of Europe to its status as the center of Christianity in the near future, since for him, the next Christendom will be established in Africa and perhaps South America. So, why is he optimistic about the future of Christianity in Europe? Precisely because of immigration. As he points out, the immigration to Europe that has taken place over the past few decades has come not just from Islamic countries but from the majority Christian countries of sub-Sahara Africa. As a result, many of the largest congregations in Europe today are comprised of African immigrants and their children.

But will this mean a return to Christianity in Europe? It is at this point that Jenkins is unduly optimistic. It is unlikely that the African immigrants are going to convert their European neighbors to the faith. (Cultural differences will play their part in this, as will the fact that the immigrants tend to live in their own communities.) Moreover, although immigration has taken place, it is not likely that these immigrants will become a significant percentage of the European population any time soon, if ever. Finally, if and when these immigrants become assimilated into the broader European culture, why suppose that their Christian faith will permeate that culture? Why not suppose that the immigrant community will become as secular as the Europeans are today?
Beranyle
God's Continent makes a convincing case that the decline of European Christianity and the rise of Islam in Europe are not reaching quite the apocalyptic heights feared by so many. Islam is growing, but it is in many ways capitulating to the same forces of modernism and secularism that have weakened European Christianity. At the same time, the immigration trends that are bringing Islam to Europe are also bringing to the continent the vibrant Christian faith of Africa and Asia - a faith that has not capitulated to modernism's insistence upon a deep divide between the sacred and the secular, between the religious and the political. Jenkins argues that this growing Christian faith is often ignored - not because it isn't real or vital, but because it is found primarily in immigrant communities. Old-stock Europeans see immigrants from Asia and Africa and simply assume that Islam is on the rise - when, in fact, many of those immigrants are bringing a Christian faith that is often quite orthodox and vibrant.

Jenkins certainly grants that the rise of Islam is a real challenge for Europe, and he devotes quite a bit of effort at describing a way forward. Too much of his proposed solution, it seems to me, involves hoping that both Islam and Christianity make their peace with Western secularism, embracing a deep divide between the sacred and the secular, the religious and the political. The rise of Islam is exposing the bankruptcy of Western culture's gods of pluralism and multiculturalism. The solution is not for the church to defend those gods. Rather, we have much to learn from global Christianity's embrace of the communal and public character of Christian faith.
Eta
The first half of the book, on the state of Christianity in Europe, is outstanding. It contains a great deal of important and significant information that I have not seen reported anywhere else, indicating that Christianity is not quite so moribund in Europe as is commonly reported.

The second half of the book, on Islam in Europe, is uneven. Jenkins begins with a number of generalizations to the effect that the common stories of the threat of Islam in Europe are overblown and unwarranted. But then he spends the rest of the book giving extensive detail and analysis to the effect that Islam is indeed a grave threat to European culture and Western security. It's an odd disconnect.

In all, an excellent book and well worth the read.
Thetalen
Jenkins' analysis of the state of Christianity and Islam in Europe is thorough and realistic. If he does have a bias it is that he likes to surprise people with new, little-known facts to shade your opinion. Although the subject matter is religion, the book is chock full of information and modern history, and yes, a little philosophical speculation. It is one of the best books available on one of the most important problems facing the 21st century.