» » Jews for Sale?: Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945

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by Yehuda Bauer
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World
  • Author:
    Yehuda Bauer
  • ISBN:
    0300059132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300059137
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; First edition (October 26, 1994)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1101 kb
  • ePUB format
    1784 kb
  • DJVU format
    1878 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    675
  • Formats:
    rtf azw docx mobi


Start by marking Jews for Sale?: Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945 as Want to Read

Start by marking Jews for Sale?: Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jews for Sale permits Yehuda Bauer's reasonable voice and scholarly virtues to enter this acrimonious debate in an attempt to counter some of the .

Jews for Sale permits Yehuda Bauer's reasonable voice and scholarly virtues to enter this acrimonious debate in an attempt to counter some of the more impassioned accusations arising from it and to divine the truth. He is calming, enlightening, persuasive, and of course, not wholly successful in his efforts-largely because of the subject's inherent difficulties and because he too has an agenda.

In Bauer's view, resistance to the Nazis comprised not only physical opposition, but any activity that gave the Jewish people dignity and humanity in the most . Jews for Sale? Nazi–Jewish Negotiations 1933–1945. Yale University Press, 1994, p. 72. ^ Vrba, Rudolf.

In Bauer's view, resistance to the Nazis comprised not only physical opposition, but any activity that gave the Jewish people dignity and humanity in the most humiliating and inhumane conditions. Furthermore, Bauer has disputed the popular view that most Jews went to their deaths passively-"like sheep to the slaughter". He argues that, given the conditions in which the Jews of Eastern Europe had to live under and endure, what is surprising is not how little resistance there was, but rather how much.

Bauer then concentrates on the negotiations that took place between 1942 and 1945 as Himmler tried to keep open options for a separate peace with the Western powers

Bauer then concentrates on the negotiations that took place between 1942 and 1945 as Himmler tried to keep open options for a separate peace with the Western powers. In fascinating detail Bauer portrays the dramatic intrigues that took place: a group of Jewish leaders bribed a Nazi official to stop the deportation of Slovakian Jews; a Czech Jew kwn as Dogwood tried to create an alliance between American leaders and conservative German anti-Nazis; Adolf Eichmann's famous trucks for blood proposal to exchange one million Jews for trucks to use. against the Soviets failed because of Western.

Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945. Tormenting questions arise throughout Bauer's discussion

Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945. The world has recently learned of Oskar Schindler's efforts to save the lives of Jewish workers in his factory in Poland by bribing Nazi officials. Not as well known, however, are many other equally dramatic attempts to negotiate with the Nazis for the release of Jews in exchange for money, goods, or political benefits. Tormenting questions arise throughout Bauer's discussion. If the Nazis were actually willing to surrender more Jews, should the Allies have acted on the offer? Did the efforts to exchange lives for money constitute collaboration with the enemy or heroism?

Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945. In this riveting book, a leading Holocaust scholar examines the dramatic attempts to negotiate with the Nazis for the release of Jews in exchange for money, goods, or political benefits, and explores the moral issues raised by the negotiations. Published by: Yale University Press. The world has recently learned of Oskar Schindler's efforts to save the lives of Jewish workers in his factory in Poland by bribing Nazi officials

Nazi-Jewish Negotiations, 1933-1945.

Jews for Sale? NaziJewish Negotiations, 1933–1945. Michael Burleigh, "Yehuda Bauer, Jews for Sale? NaziJewish Negotiations, 1933–1945," The Journal of Modern History 69, no. 4 (December 1997): 893-895. Yale University Press, 1994.

Bauer (Holocaust studies, Hebrew U. of Jerusalem) examines attempts to negotiate with the Nazis for the release of Jewish prisoners in exchange for money, goods, and political benefits, between 1942 and 1945. He describes the participants involved in various efforts and their motives, frustrations, and few successes, and analyzes the moral issues raised by the negotiations. Bauer recounts success stories such as that of a journalist paying Nazi officials $1,500 per person to save a trainload of Hungarian Jews. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

Lavivan
This is without a doubt one of the driest books I have ever read on the Holocaust. I could only make it through the first 2 chapters and gave it to the library. It may have a lot of good facts, but I consider it unreadable. My head was spinning with a plethora of names, both individuals and organizations. Buy only if your interest is extreme and concentration intense and focused.
Silverbrew
There are several books on the negotiations the Nazis forced the Jewish people into. This racket for hypothetic survival had to be analyzed through time and this is what the author does to perfection.
The progressive superposition of the Nazi emigration policy and their attempt to replace, in the secret negotiations with the allies for a separate peace with the west, Hitler's head by the Jewish lives they were cynically harvesting is clearly shown here.
As a Christian reviewer, I think that the author has duly treated with dignity the debate over Kasztner's negotiations and money aspects in Jewish survival matters. It was taking crazy politics of post-war periods to blame the ones who had saved whoever they could by every means they could find.
How can someone blame another human beings for having first taken care of his foes and family.
The father of the reviewer resisted the anti-semitic nazi madness in France and for that shared for several years the Jewish fate in Buchenwald, Flossenburg and Mauthausen. It was an "unnecessary experience" (to quote an Auschwitz survivor) but as Yeshuda Bauer rightfully states in his final words: these people should not be juged by their success or failure in resisting criminal authorities, but by the answer to a basic moral question: did they try? And try they did.
People dying in the concentration camps begged survivors letting them sware they would withness their suffering to the world: some of their voices have joined in Yeshuda Bauer's lines. The testimony should be read, and the respect for the victim extended to the author who testified for them.
Dog_Uoll
A fascinating and brilliantly researched book about a little-known aspect of the Holocaust.