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by Greg Bottoms
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  • Author:
    Greg Bottoms
  • ISBN:
    0226066851
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226066851
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Chicago Press; First edition edition (March 30, 2007)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1982 kb
  • ePUB format
    1592 kb
  • DJVU format
    1154 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    902
  • Formats:
    doc azw rtf txt


In The Colorful Apocalypse, Greg Bottoms serves his readers as Joseph Conrad’s Marlow did in The Heart of Darkness. With this wonderful nonfiction look at the work of several outsider artists, Bottoms again shows us how art can save our lives, all of us. A masterful work.

In The Colorful Apocalypse, Greg Bottoms serves his readers as Joseph Conrad’s Marlow did in The Heart of Darkness. The river Bottoms navigates is a flood of outsider art, its heart of darkness a torrent of pain, sorrow, anger, suspicion, and longing. Like Paul on the road to Tarsus, each of the artists Bottoms investigates or interviews has experienced a shattering revelation.

The Colorful Apocalypse book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Colorful Apocalypse: Journeys in Outsider Art as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Greg Bottoms gets us deep inside not just the art, but the making, the .

Greg Bottoms gets us deep inside not just the art, but the making, the visionary angst that drives these outsiders, these unassimilated originals. Sven Birkerts, author of The Gutenberg Elegies, "In The Colorful Apocalypse, Greg Bottoms serves his readers as Joseph Conrad's Marlow did inThe Heart of Darkness. Author Greg Bottoms has twisted the truth and fabricated much of the information in the book.

The Colorful Apocalypse: Journeys in Outsider Art. by Greg Bottoms. The Reverend Howard Finster was twenty feet tall, suspended in darkness. With his prodigious gift for conversation and quietly observant storytelling, Bottoms draws us into the worlds of such figures as William Thomas Thompson, a handicapped ex-millionaire who painted a 300-foot version of the book of Revelation; Norbert Kox, an ex-member of the Outlaws biker gang who now lives as a recluse in rural Wisconsin and paints apocalyptic visual parables; and. Myrtice West, who began painting to express the revelatory visions she had after her daughter was brutally murdered.

The Reverend Howard Finster was twenty feet tall, suspended in darkness. Or so he appeared in the documentary film that introduced a teenaged Greg Bottoms to the renowned outsider artist whose death would help inspire him, fourteen years later, to travel the country.

Author: Greg Bottoms Title: The colorful apocalypse : journeys in outsider art Publisher: University Of Chicago Press Publication Date: 6/12/2015 ISBN: 9780226066875 Paperback (English). Generate PDF. Sponsors. The H-Net Book Channel. About the H-Net Book Channel. Feeding the Elephant: A Forum on Scholarly Communications. All Feeding the Elephant Posts. Browse All Categories.

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Bottoms, Greg (2011). Duponis janine dupont arts court at duponis. com Archived 5 April 2005 at the Wayback Machine at ww. uponis. The Colorful Apocalypse: Journeys in Outsider Art. ReadHowYouWant. p. 74. ISBN 9781459614321. "August Natterer, 1868–1933 – UK Disability History Month". Retrieved 2 January 2020. The outcomes of their epiphanies are seldom benign: paintings that are hellfire sermons brim with dead babies, Satanic brides, and world-destroying conspiracies

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The Reverend Howard Finster was twenty feet tall, suspended in darkness. Or so he appeared in the documentary film that introduced a teenaged Greg Bottoms to the renowned outsider artist whose death would help inspire him, fourteen years later, to travel the country. Beginning in Georgia with a trip to Finster’s famous Paradise Gardens, his journey—of which The Colorful Apocalypse is a masterly chronicle—is an unparalleled look into the lives and visionary works of some of Finster’s contemporaries: the self-taught evangelical artists whose beliefs and oeuvres occupy the gray area between madness and Christian ecstasy.With his prodigious gift for conversation and quietly observant storytelling, Bottoms draws us into the worlds of such figures as William Thomas Thompson, a handicapped ex-millionaire who painted a 300-foot version of the book of Revelation; Norbert Kox, an ex-member of the Outlaws biker gang who now lives as a recluse in rural Wisconsin and paints apocalyptic visual parables; and Myrtice West, who began painting to express the revelatory visions she had after her daughter was brutally murdered. These artists’ works are as wildly varied as their life stories, but without sensationalizing or patronizing them, Bottoms—one of today’s finest young writers—gets at the heart of what they have in common: the struggle to make sense, through art, of their difficult personal histories.In doing so, he weaves a true narrative as powerful as the art of its subjects, a work that is at once an enthralling travelogue, a series of revealing biographical portraits, and a profound meditation on the chaos of despair and the ways in which creativity can help order our lives.


RUsich155
In this book, the author recounts a physical and psychological journey. He travels to meet several visionary artists or those close to them. His adventure is an attempt to understand the life of his brother, who struggled with mental illness and said he experienced visions. Are all visionaries mentally ill? Are they, in fact, in touch with a higher reality? As an agnostic, the author struggles with these questions.

His training as an academic puts him in the position of judging the work of others in a supposedly unbiased way. What he doesn't explicitly state is that this training tends to disparage any type of religious experience. Although the author does not make a judgment about the validity of these artists' experiences, he is strangely drawn to them. This book is a sincere effort by someone trying to truly understand the life and art of those who are outside of the mainstream.
Brightcaster
I really enjoyed this book. The author creates vivid and beautiful imagery with their creative prose.
Tetaian
Greg Bottoms's project here is to figure out how the mental, physical, and familial truams of the outsider artists he examines is connected to their violent, apocalpytic, and death-haunted outsider art. What explains their passion and compulsion for creating their visionary and charismatic art? This links to his own past: Bottom had a violently schizophrenic brother who claimed to have religious visions and tried to kill himself. What distinguishes the visions and disturbing art of these outsider artists from the madness of schizophrenia and other disorders? The book is at its best (and really quite brilliant and revelatory) when Bottoms analyzes the psychology of these artists, his simultaneous connection to and detachment from them, and the impulse that drives them to make their art.
Kieel
First of all, this is not what I expected when I ordered it. I thought it would be a book OF art, and it is a book ABOUT four artists - Howard Finster, William Thomas Thompson, Norbert Nox, and Myrtice West. All four are "evangelical artists," who believe they have been grabbed by God and commended to paint. Professor Bottoms, who had a schizophrenic brother, is exploring the gray area between madness and Christian ecstasy. In his mind, they are struggling to make sense, through religion and art, of their difficult personal histories, to get past the "chaos of despair" and find ways in which "creativity can help order our lives."

This approach is both the book's greatest strength and greatest weakness.

Because the author is neutral on religion, he can critique without bering excessively "pro" or "anti." He is best when showing how the artists, coming from an extreme fundamentalism, are actually painting critiques of that very fundamentalism. He points out a major difference between these artists and his mentally ill brother: "... by contemporary psychological standards, he [West] probably was somewhat mad, but, as far as I could tell, he was not tortured or in pain in the least. He was a lot happier than most people I know ..." [p.54]

However, being that neutral also leaves him without a real conclusion other than the "revelations" the people have help them make sense of their world. Well-and-good, but that can be said of almost anyone, and is hardly what makes them unique. Statements such as "... I believe painting for West is like praying, a kind of concentrated ritual meant to show total devotion and thus bring about positive change ..." [p.47] is hardly unique to Ms. West, as many of us who "are religious" have such "concentrated rituals." For some, for example, attending Eucharist does this, and that is hardly a work of "outsider art," except, I suppose, in the sense we are to be in the world but not of it.
Rude
The Colorful Apocalype is an excellent book that offers a unique blend of cultural history and theory, travel writing, and autobiography. It is also a very human and touching portrait of Southerners using art and religion to make sense of their pasts. The author's own past dealing with mental illness gives him a unique perspective and keeps him from harshly judging others because he too has been close to "crazy." A very literary book filled with dazzling writing and insight into religious obsession and psychology that would be classified as outside the norm.
Usishele
Once again, Bottoms turns his incisive gaze onto the topics of madness and creativity. With this wonderful nonfiction look at the work of several outsider artists, Bottoms again shows us how art can save our lives, all of us. A masterful work.