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by Anna Salton Eisen,George Lucius Salton
Download The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir fb2
World
  • Author:
    Anna Salton Eisen,George Lucius Salton
  • ISBN:
    0299179702
  • ISBN13:
    978-0299179700
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (September 18, 2002)
  • Pages:
    248 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1694 kb
  • ePUB format
    1540 kb
  • DJVU format
    1576 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    388
  • Formats:
    doc azw docx mbr


In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation. has been added to your Cart.

In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation.

George Lucius Salton emigrated to the United States after liberation. He earned degrees in physics and engineering and had a successful career in the . Department of Defense and private industry. He lives in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. edu or (608) 263-0734. If you want to examine a book for possible course use, please see our Course Books page.

A page for friends of George Salton and interest in The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir. In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation. His father, a lawyer, was forbidden to work, but eleven-year-old George dug potatoes, split wood, and resourcefully helped his family. The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir bir bağlantı paylaştı. 2 Mayıs 2016 ·. inSIGHT announces new Salton Fund. Have you checked this out? conta. The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir. They suffered hunger and deprivation, a forced march to the Rzeszow ghetto, then eternal separation when fourteen-year-old George and his brother were left behind to labor in work camps while their parents were deported in boxcars to die in Belzec.

Books online: The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir, 2004, Fishpond. A powerful, searing recollection of the past, telling George Salton's story with a fierce integrity that is both descriptive and introspective. Michael Berenbaum, author of "The World Must Know" and former consultant to Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation Project.

In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating . com User, March 10, 2003

In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation. com User, March 10, 2003. The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir is the chilling personal testimony and memoir of the daily life of George Lucius Salton, a Jewish man who survived the living hell of a Nazi concentration camp.

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In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German . People Who Liked The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir Also Liked These Free Titles: Allen Ginsberg Class on Revising Autobiographical Poems by Allen Ginsberg. Henry A. Crumpton on The Art of Intelligence by Henry A. Crumpton. A Conversation with Studs Terkel by Studs Terkel.

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In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation. His father, a lawyer, was forbidden to work, but eleven-year-old George dug potatoes, split wood, and resourcefully helped his family. They suffered hunger and deprivation, a forced march to the Rzeszow ghetto, then eternal separation when fourteen-year-old George and his brother were left behind to labor in work camps while their parents were deported in boxcars to die in Belzec. For the next three years, George slaved and barely survived in ten concentration camps, including Rzeszow, Plaszow, Flossenburg, Colmar, Sachsenhausen, Braunschweig, Ravensbrück, and Wobbelin. Cattle cars filled with skeletal men emptied into a train yard in Colmar, France. George and the other prisoners marched under the whips and fists of SS guards. But here, unlike the taunts and rocks from villagers in Poland and Germany, there was applause. "I could clearly hear the people calling: "Shame! Shame!" . . . Suddenly, I realized that the people of Colmar were applauding us! They were condemning the inhumanity of the Germans!" Of the 500 prisoners of the Nazis who marched through the streets of Colmar in the spring of 1944, just fifty were alive one year later when the U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division liberated the Wobbelin concentration camp on the afternoon of May 2, 1945. "I felt something stir deep within my soul. It was my true self, the one who had stayed deep within and had not forgotten how to love and how to cry, the one who had chosen life and was still standing when the last roll call ended."

JUST DO IT
This is a powerful, extremely well written, first hand story of how one young Jewish boy of 14 year of age survives the worst that we have ever heard of coming out of the holocaust. We've all heard the stories, know the truths of the holocaust. That said, Mr. Salton gives us the most personal, excruciating personal details of what it was like to barely survive over four years of the very worst treatment anyone could experience at the hands of other human beings. I thank Mr. Salton for preserving his story for all of us in his exceptional book. His positive spirit, written in the last pages, is overwhelming.
Faell
This is the only book I have ever read through in one sitting. It was so captivating that I couldn't put it down. It took me an entire afternoon, evening and into the night until about 3am.

The author has an amazing ability to make you feel like you are right there with him. His writing is a detailed personal narrative of his horrific experiences and unusually strong will to survive and maintain hope in the midst of pure hell.

This is the most meaningful memoir I have ever read and it changed me. I often find myself thinking of some of the memories and concepts he described in the book. It has left a lasting mark on me and I highly recommend this book to everyone.
Orevise
This book is worth reading even if you think you know what happened to the Jews in the concentration camps in Poland and in the slave labor camps in Germany. The book is written by someone whose teenage years and family were lost to the Nazi system of forced labor, sadism and murder. His account is harrowing.

The amount of courage it took for the author and his family to dredge up these detailed memories - names of guards, names of prisoners, dates, cities, quotations - and the violence and humiliation he suffered - there is no doubt that he became a Mensch in spite of those who treated him as less than a dog.

For people researching Shoah, this book documents survival from the Polish Jewish prisoner's point of view, starting from the moment Germany invaded Poland - during the "selection" process, in multiple forced labor camps, during forced marches and during the boxcar transports. It documents the reactions of non-Jewish citizens in Poland, Germany and France to the public humiliation and (rare) escape attempts of the prisoners. It documents the lies that were told in order to trick the prisoners into joining transports to Belzac, and how slowly rumors of the truth reached the surviving family members. It documents the progression of laws that harmed Jews. It documents a wide range of slave labor, torture and punishment - from first-hand experience and from what he witnessed happening to other prisoners. It documents the few moments when someone risked their own safety to provide compassion or a scrap of food or the transmission of a message.

Warning: this book is highly experiential. You will not be able to put it down. You will have to put it down.

It is probably not suitable for teenagers and young adults without mature adult discussion.

Many thanks to the author and his family for making the story public.
Vudogal
This gut-wrenching account of relentless torture lasting through all the years of World War II is painful to read - I cant imagine how agonizing it must have been to write it. I can't even begin to imagine what a single day of this torture must feel like, let alone year after year of persecution. I lost count of how many camps this survivor was sent to. There must have been at least ten. I wouldn't have survived a week, so I can only marvel at those who live through the Nazi hell that Jews in Poland and elsewhere were put through.
This is a very well written account. I just finished reading another that wasn't; a highly priced book in which the author, surprisingly a writer, wasn't really telling a story but just repeating thoughts. I've read so many memoirs and books on the Holocaust I almost feel I was there - but of course no one who wasn't can ever replicate the suffering even in imagination. The one thing that struck me about this book was how the persecution never let up for a moment. In the daytime it would be the SS guards with their truncheons and their spitting abuse and by night it would be the cold, the dying, the smells, the hunger, the sickness and the lice. Once again I find myself marveling at how very easily segments of the human race can convince themselves that their hatred is justified and their mind numbingly violent actions justified. And all in the name of religion? The Christians' own Jesus would never have condoned anything like the Holocaust. Yet, half the population of Europe had no problem killing the other half because they were Jews? I thought I was jaded with Holocaust reading but this memoir convinces me that I will never ever "get over" what happened or understand what makes this ugly human race tick.
Ah yes, sometimes I have to force myself to remember there were many wonderful people, on all sides, during World War II as well. But my goodness was it a feast of cruelty in which violence was honed to a fine art, an industry, a passion.
I am so very saddened by the author's unending love for his lost family and his friends. You can sense, in the way he describes them, that he's a person who is filled with love for people. I'm touched by his children and grandchildren, wanting to share , so many years later, his burden of traumatic memories.
I'm very saddened. But glad that I read The 23rd Psalm.