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by Alister E. McGrath
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  • Author:
    Alister E. McGrath
  • ISBN:
    0310590914
  • ISBN13:
    978-0310590910
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Zondervan (August 30, 1993)
  • Pages:
    242 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1674 kb
  • ePUB format
    1614 kb
  • DJVU format
    1511 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    297
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Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic apologetics.

Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic apologetics. Alister Edgar McGrath (born 1953) is an Irish theologian, priest, intellectual historian, scientist, and Christian apologist, who is a professor at the University of Oxford, and is Principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.

Intellectuals Don't Need God is for anyone who has questions about the validity of Christianity as well as for students, pastors, and lay leaders. Anyone who works with students and young people especially needs to read this book. As McGrath says, apologetics is not about winning arguments - it is about bringing people to Christ. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. As McGrath says, "apologetics is not about winning arguments - it is about bringing people to Christ. Books related to Intellectuals Don't Need God and Other Modern Myths

Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic .

Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic apologetics, for people who feel that Christianity.

Intellectuals don't need God and other modern myths.

Intellectuals don't need God & other modern myths. Are you sure you want to remove Intellectuals don't need God & other modern myths from your list? Intellectuals don't need God & other modern myths. building bridges to faith through apologetics. by Alister E. McGrath. Includes bibliographical references (p. 234-236) and index. Originally published: Bridge-building. Leicester : InterVarsity Press, 1992. Intellectuals don't need God and other modern myths.

by Alister E. McGrath -Intellectuals Don't Need . Create This Book 2: Volume 2 by Moriah Elizabeth (Paperback, 2018).

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File: EPUB, . 2 MB. 15. Scientific Theology: Volume 1: Nature. File: EPUB, 424 KB. 20. Iustitia Dei: A History of the Christian Doctrine of Justification. Cambridge University Press.

Alister Edgar McGrath FRSA (born 1953) is a Northern Irish theologian, priest, intellectual historian, scientist, Christian apologist, and public intellectual. He currently holds the Andreas Idreos Professorship in Science and Religion in the Faculty of Theology and Religion at the University of Oxford, and is Professor of Divinity at Gresham College.

jpg (6. 7 Kb). Intellectuals Don't Need God and Other Modern Myths - McGrath, Alister . pub (42. 1 Kb). metadata. opf (. 8 Kb). Trackers. Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic apologetics, for people who feel that Christianity must have a broader appeal that to reason alone if it is to be persuasive to non-Christians. Alister McGrath shows convincingly that reason is only one of many possible points of contact between the non-Christian and the gospel.

Intellectuals Don't Need God is for people who are not convinced by the arguments of classical, rationalistic apologetics, for people who feel that Christianity must have a broader appeal that to reason alone if it is to be persuasive to non-Christians. Alister McGrath shows convincingly that reason is only one of many possible points of contact between the non-Christian and the gospel. In today's world, nonrational concerns -- such as a sense that life lacks focus, an unconscious fear of death, a deep sense of longing for something unknown we don’t have but know we need -- are much more effective points of contact for apologetics. In this book, Dr. McGrath (who is both a theologian and a scientist with a Ph.D. in microbiology) combines the clarity of a brilliant scientific mind with a deep commitment to Christ and to reaching non-Christians. Intellectuals Don't Need God is for anyone who has questions about the validity of Christianity as well as for students, pastors, and lay leaders. Anyone who works with students and young people especially needs to read this book. As McGrath says, "apologetics is not about winning arguments -- it is about bringing people to Christ."


Kann
'Intellectuals Don't Need God And Other Modern Myths' is a valuable addition to an apologetics library.

It does not focus on the evidences of Christianity, although it does contain some of that. This book is more about how to interact with another person in an apologetics discussion. As the author states, 'The science of apologetics needs to be complemented by the art of apologetics." Written by Dr. Alister McGrath, one might expect more hard core science since McGrath has a doctorate in microbiology, but in this volume, he addresses the art side more.

Two things that Dr. McGrath really stresses are listening before responding and personalizing the approach to the individual. Both of these are very much needed. He compares apologists to physicians in that they both need to have a strong bedside manner or else their knowledge and skills in other areas will not be effective.

There are many very helpful areas in this book including the need to explore the presuppositions of the listener(s) and the need to use images, stories, etc., rather than just sticking with arguments, reason, etc.

Dr. McGrath does explore some of the arguments and evidences for Christianity, but these are not the main focus. For that reason, this would probably not be a great introductory apologetics work, but it is a very good one to supplement some others.
The Sinners from Mitar
I have always enjoyed Dr McGraths writings. His background is uniquely suited to engage in discussions involving science and religion. This work can be summed up by the last statement in his concluding remarks, that apologetics is not just about winning arguments, it is about winning people. He give his views on the philosophy behind good apologetics, from both perspectives. I recommend this book as an addition to a well rounded library in the armamentarian of the apologist.
Lianeni
I read this for an apologetics class I was taking and left notes in the margins to re-read certain chapters later. McGrath presents issues and goes deep with answers. I enjoyed the clarity of his writing.
Ance
Great exactly what was expected.
Cerekelv
I am an avid Alister McGrath fan. His books are all vell thouht out and well written.
Juce
Just what I was looking for
POFOD
I found useful arguments that I can use in this very book. However, I found it a little too protestant. One important idea that was attributed to Calvin also appears in Aquinas.Author's view of Scripture seems divorced from the Church that wrote it. History is too important to be dismissed.
Alister Edgar McGrath (born 1953) is an Irish theologian, priest, intellectual historian, scientist, and Christian apologist, who is a professor at the University of Oxford, and is Principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. He wrote in the Introduction to this 1993 book, “This book does not seek to discard or discredit traditional approaches to apologetics---it seeks to supplement them. It aims to make available different ways of thinking and doing apologetics---ways that complement the more traditional approaches…. Above all, this book seeks to stimulate its readers to explore and develop approaches to the defense of the gospel that are appropriate to their own special needs and opportunities.” (Pg. 11)

He argues, “The Euthyphro dilemma has force if, and ONLY if, human and divine ideas of justice or goodness are understood to be two completely independent entities…. But the Christian doctrine of God destroys the dilemma by insisting upon an inbuilt and indissoluble link between human and divine ideas of goodness, which persists even in fallen human nature. We recognize that what God does is right, because we have been created in the image of divine ideas of righteousness. Human and divine ideas of goodness resonate; the disharmony proposed by Plato is an irrelevance, given the Christian understanding of God and human nature.” (Pg. 41-42)

He observes, “The idea that Christianity is obsolete has itself become obsolete. It has a curiously dated feel to it, like a relic of a bygone era. The person who mechanically repeats the parrot cries of earlier generations---‘science has disproved Christianity’; ‘Christianity is irrelevant in a world come of age’---has become stranded in a time warp. It may take some time for this fact to filter down from the opinion-makers to popular writing, but it has happened… It is a shift in favor of faith.” (Pg. 66)

He acknowledges, “Christian faith is a risk because it cannot be proven. It is not a state of calm and easy security, but is more like an adventure, a ceaseless battling with troubles… But Christian faith rests on history, reason, experience, and revelation, a formidable quartet that, like the four legs of a well-balanced table, gives security and stability to the life of faith.” (Pg. 81)

He notes, “Faith in the Resurrection and Incarnation is what kept and keeps Christianity growing and spreading… In a day and age when Christianity has to fight for its existence, winning converts rather than relying on a favorable cultural milieu, a nonincarnational theology despoiled of the Resurrection has little to commend it…. What, it must be asked in all seriousness, is the CONVERTING POWER of an incarnationless Christianity?” (Pg. 133)

He admits, “The doctrine of universal salvation initially seems attractive… All will be saved. But on closer inspection, this seems to amount to some kind of spiritual authoritarianism. All WILL be saved, whether they like it or not. Human freedom is compromised… the idea of spending eternity with God is profoundly unattractive to many people! The idea that this is going to be forced on them will hardly strike them as good news!” (Pg. 142-143)

He suggests, “The fact that we cannot prove that Christianity is true is no longer the crippling disadvantage it was once thought to be … It merely place Christians in the best of intellectual company and marks them off from those who naively think that the really important things in life CAN be proved with certainty. Those who lack psychological maturity may need to cling to the illusions of certainty; the rest of us are content to learn to live in a world in which nothing important is certain and nothing certain is important.” (Pg. 155)

He asserts, “There is no need to revert to pagan ideas of gods and goddesses to recover the idea that God is neither masculine nor feminine. Those ideas are already firmly embedded in Scripture… Feminism… is a powerful challenge to Christianity… Just as Marxism failed… so it seems that feminism will fail also. As a critique of Christianity, it has much to offer and much to say and deserves a careful hearing. But where it seeks replace the gospel with its own secularized worldview, it seems certain to fail, having overstepped it resources and failed to recognize its own limitations… feminism if one voice among many, not THE voice that relativizes everything else.” (Pg. 174-175)

He concludes, “We have stressed that apologetics is both a science and an art. It is an academic discipline, rigorously grounded in Christian theology and passionately concerned to demonstrate and defend the truth of Christianity. But it is also a draft, a creative attempt to ensure that the gospel proclamation meshes as closely as possible with the needs and concerns of human existence… Christian apologetics centers on twin foci: … the truth and reliability of the Christian revelation, and … the need to relate it to, and demonstrate its transformative potential for, the human situation.” (Pg. 211)

This book will be of interest to those studying Apologetics.