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by Anaїs-Trissa Khatchadourian,Jane Marie Todd,Dominique Avon
Download Hezbollah: A History of the "Party of God" fb2
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  • Author:
    Anaїs-Trissa Khatchadourian,Jane Marie Todd,Dominique Avon
  • ISBN:
    0674066510
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674066519
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  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press; Translation edition (September 25, 2012)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
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Now part of the Lebanese government, Hezbollah nevertheless remains in tension with both the transnational Shiite community and a religiously diverse Lebanon. Calling for an Islamic regime would risk losing critical allies at home, but at the same time Hezbollah’s leaders cannot say that a liberal regime is the solution for the future.

Hezbollah: A History of the Party of God. Translated by Jane Marie Todd. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012. 256 pages, appendixes, bibliography, index. Got it. We value your privacy.

Download book Hezbollah : a history of th. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Hezbollah : a history of the "party of god", Dominique Avon and Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian ; translated by Jane Marie Todd.

Keywords: Dominique Avon, Anas Trissa, Trissa Khatchadourian, Party, Jane.

Hezbollah’s revolutionary role in global politics has invited lionization and vilification, rather than a clear-eyed view of its place in history

Hezbollah’s revolutionary role in global politics has invited lionization and vilification, rather than a clear-eyed view of its place in history. Hezbollah’s revolutionary role in global politics has invited lionization and vilification, rather than a clear-eyed view of its place in history.

A History of the "Party of God". Anaїs-Trissa Khatchadourian. Now part of the Lebanese government, Hezbollah nevertheless remains in tension with both the transnational Shiite community and a religiously diverse Lebanon. Consequently, they use the ambiguous expression civil but believer state.

by Dominique Avon, Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian and Jane Marie Todd

by Dominique Avon, Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian and Jane Marie Todd. Harvard University Press, 2012 Cloth: 978-0-674-06651-9 eISBN: 978-0-674-06752-3 Library of Congress Classification JQ1828. A98H621 Dewey Decimal Classification 32. 5692084. About this book toc. ABOUT THIS BOOK Hezbollah’s revolutionary role in global politics has invited lionization and vilification, rather than a clear-eyed view of its place in history.

Dominique Avon and Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian ; translated by Jane Marie Todd . The inclusion of fascinating historical documents and useful reference information make the book helpful for students seeking to understand the movement. book lays the ground for understanding Hezbollah's fall from.

Dominique Avon and Ana�s-Trissa Khatchadourian provide h For thirty years, Hezbollah has played a pivotal .

Dominique Avon and Ana�s-Trissa Khatchadourian provide h For thirty years, Hezbollah has played a pivotal role in Lebanese and global politics.

For thirty years, Hezbollah has played a pivotal role in Lebanese and global politics. That visibility has invited Hezbollah’s lionization and vilification by outside observers, and at the same time has prevented a clear-eyed view of Hezbollah’s place in the history of the Middle East and its future course of action. Dominique Avon and Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian provide here a nonpartisan account which offers insights into Hezbollah that Western media have missed or misunderstood.

Now part of the Lebanese government, Hezbollah nevertheless remains in tension with both the transnational Shiite community and a religiously diverse Lebanon. Calling for an Islamic regime would risk losing critical allies at home, but at the same time Hezbollah’s leaders cannot say that a liberal regime is the solution for the future. Consequently, they use the ambiguous expression “civil but believer state.”

What happens when an organization founded as a voice of “revolution” and then “resistance” occupies a position of power, yet witnesses the collapse of its close ally, Syria? How will Hezbollah’s voice evolve as the party struggles to reconcile its regional obligations with its religious beliefs? The authors’ analyses of these key questions—buttressed by their clear English translations of foundational documents, including Hezbollah’s open letter of 1985 and its 2009 charter, and an in-depth glossary of key theological and political terms used by the party’s leaders—make Hezbollah an invaluable resource for all readers interested in the future of this volatile force.