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by Richard Reddie
Download Abolition!: The Struggle to Abolish Slavery in the British Colonies fb2
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  • Author:
    Richard Reddie
  • ISBN:
    0745952291
  • ISBN13:
    978-0745952291
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Lion Hudson; New edition edition (January 19, 2007)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1643 kb
  • ePUB format
    1239 kb
  • DJVU format
    1447 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    707
  • Formats:
    docx doc lrf lit


Richard Reddie is Project Director for the Churches Together in England's initiative to mark the bicentenary of the 1807 Abolition of the Slave Trade Act. Previously he was Education Policy Officer for Race on the Agenda

Richard Reddie is Project Director for the Churches Together in England's initiative to mark the bicentenary of the 1807 Abolition of the Slave Trade Act. Previously he was Education Policy Officer for Race on the Agenda. He has a BA in Caribbean Studies and Spanish, and an MA in Information Management.

Abolition: the struggle to abolish slavery in the British colonies, Richard Reddie; Lion Books, 2007. Out of Slavery, Nardia Foster; Redcliffe Publishing, Bristol, 2004. Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838, Iain Whyte; Edinburgh University Press, 2006. Sins of the Father: The Atlantic Slave Traders 1441-1807, James Pope-Hennessy; Castle Books, 2004. The making of the West Indies, F. R. Augier et al; Longman Caribbean, 1960.

Really interesting book. Read it to coincide with 200th anniversary of the British Abolition of the slave trade. It's a very readable book, not in the least bit stale, with a broad focus. It examines the role of Africans in the struggle and the part they played (whether enslaved or not), the role of the church, the role of woman, the triumphs and the failures. Gives a great overview of the issue and looks at individuals other than just Wilberforce. My only criticisms (and they are slight) are tha Really interesting book.

The Struggle to Abolish Slavery in the British Colonies. Slavery as such in the British Empire wasn't abolished until 1833. by Richard S. Reddie.

Keywords: Richard, struggle, Reddie, abolition, British colonies, Abolish Slavery. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Some abolitionists acknowledged that for slavery to be abolished, the political system . The Struggle to Abolish Slavery in the British Colonies (2007).

Some abolitionists acknowledged that for slavery to be abolished, the political system needed to be reformed. This happened in 1832 when the Reform Act was passed. Not only did the Act extend the franchise, but it addressed the issues of unequal distribution of parliamentary seats and rotten boroughs. Abolition!: The Struggle to Abolish Slavery in the British Colonies (2007). The life of a slave, in his own words – The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African.

Month Day. December 18. Slavery abolished in America with adoption of 13th amendment. Following its ratification by the requisite three-quarters of the states earlier in the month, the 13th Amendment is formally adopted into the . Constitution, ensuring that neither slavery nor involuntary servitud. hall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (3 & 4 Will. IV c. 73) abolished slavery throughout the British Empire

The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (3 & 4 Will. 73) abolished slavery throughout the British Empire. This Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom expanded the jurisdiction of the Slave Trade Act 1807 which made the purchase or ownership of slaves illegal within the British Empire, with the exception of "the Territories in the Possession of the East India Company", Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and Saint Helena

Slavery Abolition Act, British act of Parliament in 1833 that abolished slavery in most British colonies. Merchants began to demand an end to the monopolies on the British market held by the Caribbean colonies and pushed instead for free trade

Slavery Abolition Act, British act of Parliament in 1833 that abolished slavery in most British colonies. Merchants began to demand an end to the monopolies on the British market held by the Caribbean colonies and pushed instead for free trade. The persistent struggles of enslaved Africans and a growing fear of slave uprisings among plantation owners were another major factor. Legal challenges to slavery in British North America. British abolitionists had actively opposed the transatlantic trade in African people since the 1770s. Several abolitionist petitions were organized in 1833 alone, which collectively garnered the support of . million signatories.

Hochschild's marvellous book is a timely reminder of what a small group of determined people, with right on their side, can achieve. Thomas Clarkson and William Wilberforce worked together to abolish the British slave trade. Wilberforce was a long time MP.

The Anti-Slave Trade Act became law on 25th March 1807. It made the capture and transport of slaves by British subjects illegal. Slavery as such in the British Empire wasn't abolished until 1833. This book tells the story of the slave trade in the British Empire and examines the movement to bring it to an end.

Silverbrew
This is a well-written, informative introduction to Britain (and other European countries') crucial and central role in maintaining the slave trade. This is not a dry and detached academic read. The writing style is personal, direct and accessible. In it you will learn such things as the fact that HSBC bank was known as Leyland Bank previously, named for the slave trader Thomas Leyland who set it up with the specific purpose of depositing the spoils from the slave trade. You will learn that the origin of the word Jamaica derives from the word Xamayca which was an Arawak word (one of the two tribes that inhabited the islands before the arrival of the Europeans.) You will learn that the first British millionaire William Beckford became so due to fortunes made on the sugar plantations in Jamaica. You will learn that King Agaja of Dahomey (present day Benin) in the 1720s opposed the slave trade and petitioned Europe to stop (contrary to the notion that Africans sold their own people and idly stood by while slavery happened). Additionally, that there were many attacks by setting on fire of slave holding ships by the African population that caught wind of what was going on. You will learn that Liverpool's net proceeds from the African slave trade between 1783-93 was over £12 million. In addition, Lancashire exported textiles which became clothes for enslaved Africans. British iron was made into chains, manacles and collars used for the slave trade. And in Liverpool slave-ship building boosted employment. Basically the slave trade was massive business (and still is today). Mr. Reddie documents this wonderfully in this relevant, motivational and inspirational book. If you enjoyed this you might also enjoy Staying Power- Black People in Britain. It is slightly longer, thicker and more dry and "academic". However it is a lengthy account of the history of black people in Britain which pre-dates the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons, through the 20th century to the current situation we have today. No more turning a blind eye.
Malogamand
Richard Reddie's book is a well-researched and broad in scope history of the Transatlantic Slave Trade which existed for 276 years. He explores the events leading up to the slave trade, painting a picture of a cultured and learned Africa which became a point in the triangular trade route - from Europe firearms, alcohol, brass, copper and manufactured goods were transported to Africa; slaves were taken in Africa and transported by the `Middle Passage' to the West Indies and America; then sugar, tobacco, rum and molasses from America were transported to Europe. Research suggests up to 15 million enslaved Africans died because of this trade and their treatment by the Europeans makes very sobering reading - especially as Christians weren't only those trying to abolish the trade but were often those who participated and benefited from it.

William Wilberforce and the other abolitionists, such as John Newton, Thomas Clarkson and the freed slave Olaudah Equiano are shown as people who worked tirelessly against the slave trade but also as people who were fallible and whose 19th century view of Africans unable to determine their own lives feels rather uncomfortable to us today. The book is an informative and yet sobering read about an alternative holocaust, one in which many Christians colluded and whose revenues founded some of our largest institutions. It makes for uncomfortable reading but it is an aspect of our history which must not be ignored.