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by Halina Nelken
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  • Author:
    Halina Nelken
  • ISBN:
    1558492925
  • ISBN13:
    978-1558492929
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Massachusetts Press (April 9, 2001)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1118 kb
  • ePUB format
    1586 kb
  • DJVU format
    1587 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    712
  • Formats:
    rtf docx doc mobi


This remarkable book tells the story of Nelken's experiences in the ghetto and later in eight Nazi concentration camps, including Plaszow, Auschwitz, and Ravensbruck

This remarkable book tells the story of Nelken's experiences in the ghetto and later in eight Nazi concentration camps, including Plaszow, Auschwitz, and Ravensbruck. This remarkable book tells the story of Nelken's experiences in the ghetto and later in eight Nazi concentration camps, including Plaszow, Auschwitz, and Ravensbruck

And Yet, I Am Here! book. When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Halina Nelken was a precocious fifteen-year-old, living a middle-class life in Krakow.

And Yet, I Am Here! book. Like other girls her age, she recorded her personal observations and feelings in a diary. As conditions in Krakow deteriorated and her family was forced into the Jewish ghetto, she continued to write, eventually smuggling her diary out with a Catholic When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Halina Nelken was a precocious fifteen-year-old, living a middle-class life in Krakow.

And yet, I am here! by. Halina Nelken. The original books is too bright. Nelken, Halina - Diaries. Jews - Poland - Kraków - Diaries. Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) - Poland - Personal narratives. Kraków (Poland) - Biography. University of Massachusetts Press.

When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Halina Nelken was a precocious teenager, living a middle-class life in. .This remarkable book tells the story of Nelken's experiences in the ghetto and later in eight Nazi concentration camps, including Plaszow, Auschwitz, and Ravensbruck.

When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Halina Nelken was a precocious teenager, living a middle-class life in Krakow.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. And yet, I am here! Halina Nelken.

The Museum’s Collections document the fate of Holocaust victims, survivors, rescuers, liberators, and others through artifacts, documents, photos, films, books, personal stories, and more

The Museum’s Collections document the fate of Holocaust victims, survivors, rescuers, liberators, and others through artifacts, documents, photos, films, books, personal stories, and more.

And Yet, I Am Here! The powerful story of a young woman's journey .

And Yet, I Am Here! The powerful story of a young woman's journey through the Holocaust. -Alicia Nitecki, author of Recovered Land.

As a teenager, Nelken, who is Jewish, kept a diary of the permanent destruction of her comfortable life when the Nazis overran her homeland. Unlike Anne Frank, this girl survived the Holocaust to tell the full story. Now an art historian, she was born to a prosperous, assimilated Polish family. As a teenager, Nelken, who is Jewish, kept a diary of the permanent destruction of her comfortable life when the Nazis overran her homeland.

Rent And Yet I Am Here at Chegg. com and save up to 80% off list price and 90% off used textbooks. ISBN13: 9781558492929.

Halina Nelken's book starts slowly - a book anyone over 50 might write about his/her childhood home town . But, after finishing this book, my overwhelming reaction was that Halina Nelken had taken on the Nazis and won! They tried to reduce her to a sub-human and failed.

Halina Nelken's book starts slowly - a book anyone over 50 might write about his/her childhood home town-who lived where, what kind of personalities they had, what became of them and their children. Ah, suddenly it's not so mundane, as so many of these humdrum lives of ordinary people were snuffed out by the Nazis. It is this very ordinariness that serves as a foil for the horrors that Halina Nelken experienced as an adolescent and young woman and writes about - powerfully - in this book.

When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Halina Nelken was a precocious fifteen-year-old, living a middle-class life in Krakow. Like other girls her age, she recorded her personal observations and feelings in a diary. As conditions in Krakow deteriorated and her family was forced into the Jewish ghetto, she continued to write, eventually smuggling her diary out with a Catholic friend. This remarkable book tells the story of Nelken's experiences in the ghetto and later in eight Nazi concentration camps, including Plaszow, Auschwitz, and Ravensbröck. Her diary entries, written between 1938 and 1943, form the core of the volume and are supplemented by recollections written shortly after the war, and by later commentaries and explanatory notes which she added in the mid-1980s. Although there exist numerous published and unpublished memoirs by Holocaust survivors, Nelken's book presents one of the few extant diaries written at the time. Already released in Polish and German editions, it has been hailed as one of the finest works of its kind. Now it is available in English for the first time.

Modar
When I first read this book in October 2013, I didn't like it very much. After rereading it I changed my mind. And Yet, I Am Here takes quite a while to get into, it takes at least fifty pages to get up to September 1 and the beginning of World War II. Those first pages explain so much about her childhood and the life Halina lived before the war. Halina and her family were upper class Polish Jews, she realized quite well how much she and her family lost materially as the war dragged on. Halina suffered through the Krakow Ghetto, Plaszow camp, Auschwitz, Ravensbruck, and Malchow. She also took care of herself and of her Mother and sister-in-law who went through most of the war with Halina. Her brother, Felek, also made it through the war. I gave the book four stars for two reasons. One, was that there was so little information about Halina's life after the war. I know she and her remaining family made it to the United States, but little else was said. Two, was about her relationship with her sister-in-law Genia that she very much didn't like. There was one paragraph where she mentioned Genia which refers to something that happened in the United States. Nothing else was said and you were left wondering what happened. Overall, though, a good book and a very inspiring read that I highly recommend.
Shazel
One of the things I liked best about this memoir was the author's description of what her life was like before it fell apart and as another reviewer said the ordinariness of it. It set the tone for the book. I also liked the way she added comments from her perspective in later years to clarify points in the diary. It was a remarkable diary detailing life in the ghetto and work camps. What I didn't like was the feeling of being left hanging when it was over. I wish she had gone into her life after the war. Also, she tended to intimate things that she never clarified but left the reader wondering. I would have rated it higher had she done more with the ending and given some hint of her life after the war.
Stylish Monkey
Halina Nelken's book starts slowly - a book anyone over 50 might write about his/her childhood home town--who lived where, what kind of personalities they had, what became of them and their children.... Ah, suddenly it's not so mundane, as so many of these humdrum lives of ordinary people were snuffed out by the Nazis. It is this very ordinariness that serves as a foil for the horrors that Halina Nelken experienced as an adolescent and young woman and writes about - powerfully - in this book. We all know something of what happened in those dark days, but Dr. Nelken makes it personal by telling exactly what happened to her and her family. The book is actually based on the diaries that she kept. Anyone who has seen and appreciated "Schindler's List" should read what kinds of things happened to the people who were not on that list. There are unforgettable moments in this book, such as the young Halina working in an office in Auchswitz and finding a record of the murder of her father. Or the terrible choices she had to make when her mother was too exhausted to continue on a forced march. Only my knowledge that her mother had survived the war made it possible to keep reading this painful account. But, after finishing this book, my overwhelming reaction was that Halina Nelken had taken on the Nazis and won! They tried to reduce her to a sub-human and failed. She came through these terrible experiences without being twisted, without being as bitter as she had a perfect right to be! She not only survived, she survived as a whole person with a sense of humor, a will to succeed, and an ability to relate to other people - even to German people. In a larger sense her book is about the triumph of the human spirit. It is, admittedly, painful to read about the atrocities that took place before and during that horrible war. But we must not ignore the testimony of this strong woman who lived through the things that we don't want to have to think about and came out of it alive and even stronger. Ada M. Prill