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by Thomas Cahill
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  • Author:
    Thomas Cahill
  • ISBN:
    0385495560
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385495561
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Anchor; Reprint edition (March 4, 2008)
  • Pages:
    368 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1864 kb
  • ePUB format
    1216 kb
  • DJVU format
    1217 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    996
  • Formats:
    doc docx mobi lrf


Thomas Cahill's appealing approach to distant history has won the attention of millions of readers in North America and beyond.

Thomas Cahill's appealing approach to distant history has won the attention of millions of readers in North America and beyond. Cahill is the author of four previous volumes in the Hinges of History series: How the Irish Saved Civilization, The Gifts of the Jews, Desire of the Everlasting Hills, and Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea. They have been bestsellers, not only in the United States but also in countries ranging from Italy to Brazil. He and his wife, Susan, also a writer, divide their time between New York and Rome.

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The reputation of the Middle Ages for thuggish cruelty is largely (if not wholly) undeserved

On the contrary, Cahill writes. The reputation of the Middle Ages for thuggish cruelty is largely (if not wholly) undeserved. which I find a bit of a relief, since I much prefer the Middle Ages of Brother Cafael to the Middle Ages of Torquemada.

Series: Cahill, Thomas. The Hinges of History. Other Books by This Author. One was, after all, traveling farther into the world than one had ever ventured before. Hinges of history ; v. 5. C. 51. 90. 7-dc22 2006044545. List of Illustrations. ma. Europe and the Middle East in the time of Constantine the Great. German Rhineland in the time of Hildegard. Most medieval wayfarers had never gone beyond the nearest market town, so every pilgrim could look forward to marvelous sights and strange encounters.

Thomas Cahill's appealing approach to distant history has won the . succeeds roundly in bringing his own gift of enticing readers to the study of the past, describing the development and definition of the medieval worldview, as well as he has ever done.

Thomas Cahill's history of Ireland during the middle ages is so well and cleverly written that you will never know you are reading nonfiction. The theme running through is as engrossing as "Vikings" on the History Channel. It is grounded in solid facts, many of which are not well known, making it a fascinating read. The author is a scholar, whose prose is not only lyrical and learned, but paints word pictures of western civilization after the fall of the Roman Empire. You will have a whole new regard for the contributions of the "Emerald Isle.

The inimitable Thomas Cahill turns his eye on the dawn of the modern Western world in this intelligent, beautifully .

The inimitable Thomas Cahill turns his eye on the dawn of the modern Western world in this intelligent, beautifully writ. Artists began to ask themselves similar questions: How can we depict human anatomy so that it looks real to the viewer? How can we depict motion in a composition that never moves? How can two dimensions appear to be three? Medieval artists (and writers, too) invented the Western tradition of realism.

People Who Read Mysteries of the Middle Ages Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History.

Introduction: rome, crossroads of the world.

On visits to the great cities of Europe-monumental Rome; the intellectually explosive Paris of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas; the hotbed of scientific study that was Oxford; and the incomparable Florence of Dante and Giotto-acclaimed historian Thomas Cahill brilliantly captures the spirit of experimentation, the colorful pageantry, and the passionate pursuit of knowledge that built the foundations for the modern world. A Chaucerian Invitation. Prelude: alexandria, city of reason. Introduction: rome, crossroads of the world. Chapter 1. Bingen and Chartres, Gardens Enclosed.

From the bestselling author of How the Irish Saved Civilization, a fascinating look at how medieval thinkers created the origins of modern intellectual movements.After the long period of decline known as the Dark Ages, medieval Europe experienced a rebirth of scholarship, art, literature, philosophy, and science and began to develop a vision of Western society that remains at the heart of Western civilization today, from the entry of women into professions that had long been closed to them to the early investigations into alchemy that would form the basis of experimental science. On visits to the great cities of Europe-monumental Rome; the intellectually explosive Paris of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas; the hotbed of scientific study that was Oxford; and the incomparable Florence of Dante and Giotto-acclaimed historian Thomas Cahill brilliantly captures the spirit of experimentation, the colorful pageantry, and the passionate pursuit of knowledge that built the foundations for the modern world.

Utchanat
Thomas Cahill is an academic best known for his "Hinges of History" series. I read the four previous books in the series and written reviews about two of them: "How the Irish Saved Civilization", "The Gifts of the Jews". The fifth book in the series is about the "Mysteries of the Middle Ages". Cahill takes a different approach in this book. Whilst the first four books centered around one topic (Irish clergy in the Middle Ages, the Jews' contribution to mankind, Jesus and the Ancient Greeks), in this book Cahill picks a few "over arching" themes that, in his mind, define the Middle Ages and writes about them from the perspective of one major city. So Alexandria is used to describe Reason; Bingen and Chartres to describe the worship of the Virgin Mary; Florence - poetry; Ravenna - politics; and so on. The book is also different from the previous ones in its beautiful layout and the images and illustrations that adorn every page. Whilst I don't think Cahill has unearthed any "mysteries" in this book, he deserves credit for the presentation and popular (sometimes too popular) style of writing.
Qusicam
I agree with most of the comments by the reviewers so far. I was, in fact, surprised when I read those comments: it is not very often that reviewers express as similar opinions as they have when describing this book. For such reason, I will not go into details about the subjects covered and how they are presented. That has already been done. I will only confirm that the book is not perfect, it has flows and can be at times irritating. For example, its purpose is not always clear, it does not limit itself to the description of people and events during the Middle Ages (as one would expect from the title), it does not always show continuity, the last chapter regarding "the sins" of the catholic church today is unnecessary (the reader almost has the impression that the author has something personal against its representatives). One additional flaw that the reviewers did not recognize: many of the quotations in foreign languages have more spelling mistakes than one would expect to see in a published book.

And yet, we cannot deny that the book - in addition to providing much information that is not generally available all in one place and that is conveyed in a (usually) easy to read manner - has an interesting charm, a charm that is, at least in part , due to the illustrations. These are not limited to pictures of the individuals discussed in the text, of cathedrals, paintings and other works of art, as traditionally done in similar books. It also includes period maps (or more likely, maps that are made to look as originated in the Middle Ages), as well as many medieval illuminations which do not add much information to the text, yet help transport the readers into the times about which they are learning.

Of the four stars above, two are for the text, two are for the illustrations.
Ieslyaenn
Thomas Cahill has a way of opening my mind to history in a way no other writer has before, with the exception of Roger Crowley.

I think it's easy to write off the people of the middle ages as being backwards until you put the middle ages into context. The classical period has been white washed. Pre-Christian Europe was much more barbaric than any historian usually gets into. Read Suetonius's Twelve Caesars written c. 120 AD and then tell me the dark ages were a step backwards.

I feel that Cahill honors the people of the high middle ages in a beautiful, truthful, and poetic way.

I'm giving it four stars because I think his idea that St. Francis's reenactment of the manger scene was somehow the beginning of film, or realism, is a ridiculous stretch.

This book will change the way you view this time period, and the time period after.
Hiylchis
This book was a recommended for AP European History. It has been a good book to fill in the missing pieces that the teachers does not have the time to teach on the middle ages.
Mojar
The Hinges of History Series is one of the most interesting and engrossing book sets I've read. I love Cahill's interesting way of presenting material and opening the mind to new ways of thinking.
superstar
This book is fantastically interesting and well-written. Like eating chocolate pudding -- just delicious.
Deeroman
I am an avid book reader, and enjoy a challenging book or two. However, this one was way too wordy to enjoy.
Cahill always provides history in a informative and readable way.He never disappoints.He iOS a national treasure.He illustrates through character development and cultural context what was happening in hype time and to individual people.He humanizes history and involves the reader in the events