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Download Prophesying Daughters: Black Women Preachers and the Word, 1823-1913 fb2

by Chanta M. Haywood
Download Prophesying Daughters: Black Women Preachers and the Word, 1823-1913 fb2
World
  • Author:
    Chanta M. Haywood
  • ISBN:
    0826214673
  • ISBN13:
    978-0826214676
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Missouri; 1 edition (May 12, 2003)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1794 kb
  • ePUB format
    1516 kb
  • DJVU format
    1721 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    803
  • Formats:
    azw mobi txt lrf


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Daughters of Thunder: Black Women Preachers and Their Sermons, 1850-1979. Haywood brings to her work the religious understanding of an insider and in the methodical eye of a scholar who evidences a firm grip on literary theory. Bettye Collier-Thomas. From Preachers to Suffragists: Woman's Rights and Religious Conviction in the Lives of Three Nineteenth-Century. Chanta M. Haywood currently serves as the Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Albany State University, where she is the chief fundraiser officer for the school.

Home Browse Books Book details, Prophesying Daughters: Black Women Preachers and. Prophesying Daughters: Black Women Preachers and the Word, 1823-1913. By Chanta M. Haywood. Haywood examines these autobiographies to provide new insight into the nature of prophesying, offering an alternative approach to literature with strong religious imagery. She analyzes how these four women employed rhetorical and political devices in their narratives, using religious discourse to deconstruct race, class, and gender issues of the nineteenth century.

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KEYWORDS: Black Women, Agency, Liminality, Transnational, Travel, Subversion, Narrative, Transgression, Travel/Travelers .

KEYWORDS: Black Women, Agency, Liminality, Transnational, Travel, Subversion, Narrative, Transgression, Travel/Travelers, Imperialism and Female Agency. JOURNAL NAME: Advances in Literary Study, Vo. N., October 25, 2017. This paper argues that some 19th century black women’s narratives, however, point to a body of resistance texts in contention with prescribed roles for such women. The textual personas of such narratives transcend the confines of home and racially-configured communities.

Keywords: Chanta, ISBN, Prophesying Daughters, Haywood, Missouri Press, women preachers, word, BLACK.

Chanta M. Haywood Booklist Chanta M. Haywood Message Board

Chanta M. Haywood Message Board. At a time when America was struggling with its newly found independence, the country was still faced with slavery in most of the South. Prophesying Daughters" tells the stories of four women, determined to spread the word in a time when women were ostracized for trying to take on a task dominated by men.

 

In nineteenth-century America, many black women left their homes, their husbands, and their children to spread the Word of God. Descendants of slaves or former “slave girls” themselves, they traveled all over the country, even abroad, preaching to audiences composed of various races, denominations, sexes, and classes, offering their own interpretations of the Bible. When they were denied the pulpit because of their sex, they preached in tents, bush clearings, meeting halls, private homes, and other spaces. They dealt with domestic ideologies that positioned them as subservient in the home, and with racist ideologies that positioned them as naturally inferior to whites. They also faced legalities restricting blacks socially and physically and the socioeconomic reality of often being part of a large body of unskilled laborers.