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by Ellen Meiksins Wood
Download Citizens to Lords: A Social History of Western Political Thought from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages fb2
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  • Author:
    Ellen Meiksins Wood
  • ISBN:
    1844677060
  • ISBN13:
    978-1844677061
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Verso; Reprint edition (August 1, 2011)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1635 kb
  • ePUB format
    1210 kb
  • DJVU format
    1344 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    666
  • Formats:
    txt lrf rtf doc


Citizens to Lords book. The final chapter, 'The Middle Ages,' was actually quite promising

Citizens to Lords book. The final chapter, 'The Middle Ages,' was actually quite promising. Wood's central thesis about the importance of property and power being split in the West is slightly truer for the feudal West, if only because the central political powers were so weak. But all too soon the same ignorance raises its head.

In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood rewrites the history of. .Other books that I would recommend in this line would be the following: 1.

In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood rewrites the history of political theory. She traces the development of the Western tradition from classical antiquity through to the Middle Ages in the perspective of social history-a significant departure not only from the standard abstract history of ideas but also from other contextual methods.

A revolutionary approach to the history of political theory. In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood lays out her innovative approach to the history of political theory and traces the development of the Western tradition from classical antiquity through the late Middle Ages. Her social history is a significant departure from other contextual interpretations. Treating canonical thinkers as passionately engaged human beings, Wood examines their ideas not simply in the context of political discourse but as creative responses to the social relations and conflicts of their time and place.

Citizens to Lords - Ellen Wood

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Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Citizens to Lords : A Social History of.A major new history of Western political thought as it evolved through conflict and communities.

A major new history of Western political thought as it evolved through conflict and communities.

Meiksins Wood's many books and articles, were sometimes written in collaboration with her husband, Neal Wood . Citizens to Lords: A Social History of Western Political Thought from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. ISBN 978-1-84467-243-1.

Meiksins Wood's many books and articles, were sometimes written in collaboration with her husband, Neal Wood (1922–2003). Of these, The Retreat from Class received the Isaac Deutscher Memorial Prize in 1988.

A Social History of Western Political Thought from Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages. by Ellen Meiksins Wood. In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood rewrites the history of political theory. Western political theory, Wood argues, owes much of its vigour, and also many ambiguities, to these complex and often contradictory relations.

Ellen Meiksins Wood (born 1942 in New York City) is a Marxist scholar. Citizens to Lords: A Social History of Western Political Thought from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (Verso, 2008). Wood was born Ellen Meiksins one year after her parents, Latvian Jews active in the Bund, arrived in New York from Europe as political refugees. She was raised in the United States and Europe. She has written many books and articles, some conjointly with her husband, Neal Wood (1922–2003).

In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood lays out her innovative approach to the history of political theory and traces the development of the Western tradition from classical antiquity through the late Middle Ages. Her "social history" is a significant departure from other contextual interpretations.

In this groundbreaking work, Ellen Meiksins Wood rewrites the history of political theory. She traces the development of the Western tradition from classical antiquity through to the Middle Ages in the perspective of social history—a significant departure not only from the standard abstract history of ideas but also from other contextual methods. Treating canonical thinkers as passionately engaged human beings, Wood examines their ideas not simply in the context of political languages but as creative responses to the social relations and conflicts of their time and place. She identifies a distinctive relation between property and state in Western history and shows how the canon, while largely the work of members or clients of dominant classes, was shaped by complex interactions among proprietors, labourers and states. Western political theory, Wood argues, owes much of its vigour, and also many ambiguities, to these complex and often contradictory relations. From the Ancient Greek polis of Plato, Aristotle, Aeschylus and Sophocles, through the Roman Republic of Cicero and the Empire of St Paul and St Augustine, to the medieval world of Averroes, Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham, Citizens to Lords offers a rich, dynamic exploration of thinkers and ideas that have indelibly stamped our modern world.

Barit
The understanding of the evolution of western political thought and its motivators is one of the objectives of Ellen Wood. Being a Marxist, she uses conflict between classes as the main generator of political thought. From the Greek democracy to the middle ages, Wood's analyses some of the most important authors integrating them in the contemporary political context and explaining with extraordinary virtuousness each political opinion and their objectives.

I'm no sociologist, so I don't really understand the feuds between their factions. But I'm an historian, and I detect some flaws in the methodology, exegesis of the ancient texts and even in the relevance of the chosen pieces. The author makes her case solely based on written texts by some thinkers...many of them that had really limited or no power at all and although their works reached our time to be analyzed, some had only extremely limited influence to their contemporaries. For example, Cicero was a consul and a prolific author, and obviously his political points of view were shared by many of the Roman elite, but almost all early imperial authors are extremely critical of Cicero's political thinking! To consider his views as a "basis" is incorrect. Other mistakes are obvious like her statement that the barbarian menace wasn't that important for Rome's decline but financial problems were the main cause...of course financial problems were the main cause, but what caused that financial problem was precisely the threat of the great barbarian confederations that forced Rome to increase immensely their army and the loss of revenue through occupied areas by foederati. Because some civilizations left few political writings Woods don't even consider them; one example is the Northman with their democracy and allthing; although they don't have great artisans of the word, their political thought had obvious repercussions everywhere they settled (including Britain).

Make no mistake; although I share those critical thoughts, this is a superb work. I believe Ellen Wood's an extremely intelligent academic and her writing is accurate, precise and to the point. The conclusions she shares about the political thinking of some authors is completely valid; she hits right on the target. Obviously trying to extrapolate those views to a broader target isn't historically valid.

Although I believe she fails in delivering a comprehensive social history of political thought, her failure overshadows most other author's successes.

Recommended.
EROROHALO
It is not easy to find out books offering an exposition of intellectual world views and the way they changed and evolved over the centuries and why. In that sense, many books only offer a summary of ideas and the people that held them which may be clear but sound totally abstract, without any link to the social life or strife of their times. So when I found this work combining social history and political analysis I decided it to give it a chance, in despite of not finding previous comments on it.

I don't propose here to review much of it - I have neither the time nor the ability to cover it all, for one thing because it would require expert historical knowledge I make no pretence to having. I will only say that, in my opinion, Woods' work is different: although she is leaned to the left more that I would like, she is capable of finding out and explaining pretty well some notable conformities between great -and not so great- thinkers' ideas [those of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas and a few others from classic Greece to the middle of the XIVth century] and the particular circumstances in which their philosophies were formulated.

All that (and much more that I do not mention in this summary) is developed in 236 pages (index excluded), the book being divided in the following way: 1. The Social History of Political Theory; 2. The Ancient Greek Polis; 3. From Polis to Empire; 4. The Middle Ages; Conclusion.

The book is no very engaging, but it is not dry either. In my opinion is a masterful work which can be savoured by the professional historian and by the educated layperson too. Therefore, my rate is between 5 (content) and 3 (pleasure, sometimes falling to 2, sometimes raising to 4).

Other books that I would recommend in this line would be the following: 1) "America's Constitution: A Biography" by Akhil Reed Amar; 2) "A Social History of Dying" by Allan Kellehear; 3) "God Owes Us Nothing: A Brief Remark on Pascal's Religion and on the Spirit of Jansenism" by Leszek Kolakowski ; 4) "The Passions and the Interests: Political Arguments for Capitalism before its Triumph", by Albert O. Hirschman; 5) "The social thought of Bernard Mandeville" by Thomas Horne; and 6) "The fear of freedom" by Erich Fromm.