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by James Tunstead Burtchaell
Download The Dying of the Light: The Disengagement of Colleges and Universities from Their Christian Churches fb2
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  • Author:
    James Tunstead Burtchaell
  • ISBN:
    0802838286
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802838285
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Eerdmans Pub Co (July 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    868 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1429 kb
  • ePUB format
    1244 kb
  • DJVU format
    1542 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    437
  • Formats:
    lit azw mbr txt


James Tunstead Burtchaell. This is an enormous book, some 868 pages long. Fr. Burtchaell deals with the secularization of the Christian colleges, which, as with Harvard and Yale, changed from a church-started, church-supported institution into secular, non-sectarian schools.

James Tunstead Burtchaell. His method is to pick one, two or three institutions in the particular denomination and deal with the history of the changes from a religious school into a secular institution. Burtchaell has a chapter for the Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans, Catholics and Evangelicals.

James Tunstead Burtchaell, who has extensive experience in American. 17 colleges in the US that started out Christian and except for two, have completely lost their Christian identity and tie to a sponsoring church. Rather depressing when you see the failure of leadership both in the church and in the colleges.

By James Tunstead Burtchaell, . Essentially, this book is the story of how many church-related institutions of higher education have made their way down the slippery slope that leads to secularization.

Countless colleges and universities in the history of the United States were founded under some sort of Christian patronage," James Burtchaell begins, "but .

Countless colleges and universities in the history of the United States were founded under some sort of Christian patronage," James Burtchaell begins, "but many which still survive do not claim any relationship with a church or denomination. oceedings{Gros1999TheDO, title {The Dying of the Light: The Disengagement of Colleges and Universities From Their Christian Churches, by James Tunstead Burtchaell}, author {Jeffrey Gros}, year {1999} }. Jeffrey Gros. James Burtchaell's incisive disection of the historical disengagement of colleges and universities from their Christian Churhes. The biting humor and irony in Burtchaell's style counterpoints the euphemistic rationale vaunting past and current disengagement from the specific founding church's credo and etholgy.

to what I thought was a Congregationalist college.

Selected by Christianity Today as one of the top ten books of 1999, The Dying of the Light provides case studies of seventeen denominationally diverse colleges and universities that explore the dynamics of church-school relations and show how and why they have tended to wither.

Selected by Christianity Today as one of the top ten books of 1999, The Dying of the Light provides case studies of seventeen denominationally diverse colleges and universities that explore the dynamics of church-school relations and show how and why they have tended to wither over time.

For subscriptions, Countless colleges and universities in the history of the . In The Fading of the Light Burtchaell holds back

For subscriptions, Countless colleges and universities in the history of the United States were founded under some sort of Christian patronage," James Burtchaell begins, "but many which still survive do not claim any relationship with a church or denomination. Even on most of the campuses which are still listed by churches as their affiliates, there is usually some concern expressed today about how authentic or how enduring that fie really is, and often wistful concern is all that remains. In The Fading of the Light Burtchaell holds back

By James Tunstead Burtchaell, . Bradley J. Longfield (a1). University of Dubuque Theological Seminary. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

James Tunstead Burtchaell, who has extensive experience in American higher education as both a teacher and an administrator, provides case studies of seventeen prominent colleges and universities with diverse ecclesial origins - Congregational, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran, Catholic, and Evangelical. Using published and archival sources as well as firsthand interaction with each institution he covers, Burtchaell narrates how each school's religious identity eventually became first uncomfortable and then expendable, and he analyzes the processes that eroded the bonds between school and church.

Crazy
This book is a great resource for gaining insight on how many of our colleges and universities were founded for providing religious training for their students...and how far they have deviated from the original purpose.
Venemarr
"The Dying of the Light" by Fr. James Tunstead Burtchaell. This is an enormous book, some 868 pages long. Fr. Burtchaell deals with the secularization of the Christian colleges, which, as with Harvard and Yale, changed from a church-started, church-supported institution into secular, non-sectarian schools. His method is to pick one, two or three institutions in the particular denomination and deal with the history of the changes from a religious school into a secular institution. Fr. Burtchaell has a chapter for the Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans, Catholics and Evangelicals. The author's irony borders on humor once in awhile, as when he wonders why the Presbyterians found it so difficult to report the number of attending Presbyterians to church boards, but now find it so easy to report to the Federal government the racial make-up of the student body, down to the last Samoan. In the preface, Fr. Burtchaell notes that the reader will probably go directly to the section dealing with his/her religious affiliation. I did, but mainly because I was working on an MA thesis on Catholic colleges in the United States. I would recommend this encyclopaedia work to any one truly interested in the recent wave of secularization of church-related colleges in the US. Many details and stories from around the nation make this an interesting micro-history....
Djang
An outstanding book! Fr. Burtchaell includes a chapter on my alma mater, St. Olaf College, from which I graduated in 1967. I know his description of St. Olaf's slide into apostasy is accurate, because I remember the events he narrates happening while I was there.
THE DYING OF THE LIGHT is a warning to Christian colleges and universities of all denominations that if they lose the Christian distinctives upon which they were founded, they will be like salt that has lost its savor.
Jeronashe
Arrived on time and as described.
Malogamand
Antidisestablishmentarianism in contemporary Catholic religious-community sponsored colleges might well be a subliminal message in Fr. James Burtchaell's incisive disection of the historical disengagement of colleges and universities from their Christian Churhes. The biting humor and irony in Burtchaell's style counterpoints the euphemistic rationale vaunting past and current disengagement from the specific founding church's credo and etholgy. The present widespread disengagement by many Catholic colleges and uni-versities is the legacy of the historic, passive, submission of church related schools beneath whelming financial and enrollment pressures.
The Vatican might well use "The Dying of the Light" as its primer to argue the case for rescuing Catholic institutions from modern-day disengagement by means of episcopal appropriation.
In his asessment of the disengagement of seven-teen representative colleges and univer-sities, the author delved deeply into their ar-chival and historical references and posits a commonality of purpose, basically driven by economic necessity.
Is "greed" the dysphoric, but correct, syn-onym for what Burtchaell records? Is "naivete" an, assuaging, palliative for moral incom-petence? Is "hierarchic megalomania" being masked by ecclesiastical dogmatism? The answers to these questions are interpretable from Burtchaell's data. The answers are not easy. The information is complex, but the pattern is quite simple, money requires compromise. The issue becomes: is the loss worth the cost? Is the price of freedom too high? Is skewed pedantry inevitable with church involvement in education? Can academic excellence be acheived without academic freedom?
Issues seem to have been ignored during the evolution of the disengagement by the churches. Questions were left unasked, because the answers were too painful. The basic rationale, seems to have been that financial support became increas-ingly limited as ecclesiastical strictures re-duced enrollments.
The ultimate emergent question becomes, can there be intellectual probity in a religious insti-tution which limits the parameters of discussion and exploration according to a predetermined schema of dogma and morals?
Burtchaell's comprehensive, paradigmatic, exposition of the disengagement process by religious schools bodes ill for any continuance of a moral or spiritual underpinning for edu-cation in our contemporary society. An argument, inferable from "The Dying of the Light", is that State and Federal governments are restricting freedom of religion and ideas and relegating morality and knowledge to a moral and intellectual relativism under the guise of monetary benignity towards education.
Wm.G.Condon, csc e-mail [email protected]
GoodBuyMyFriends
I read this book when it first came out and have recommended it again and again. It should be reprinted. The lack of leadership skills seen at all levels of American society is directly related to the lack of faith in institutions so clearly documented by Burtchaell. This book could be one all educators who want to renew faith-based education in the States use.

I hope it can be republished.