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by James A. Herrick
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  • Author:
    James A. Herrick
  • ISBN:
    0830832793
  • ISBN13:
    978-0830832798
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    IVP Books; PRINT-ON-DEMAND edition (January 2, 2005)
  • Pages:
    331 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1839 kb
  • ePUB format
    1469 kb
  • DJVU format
    1704 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    219
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James A. Herrick (born October 6, 1954) is an American academic. He is the Guy Vanderjagt Professor of Communication and former communication chair at Hope College.

James A. His early books are guides to the discipline of scholarly argumentation that discuss both traditional rhetorical techniques and contemporary applications for students and academics

The Judeo-Christian tradition of Western culture has slowly but steadily been eclipsed by a new way of viewing spirituality. This shift has been in the making for some three hundred years

The Judeo-Christian tradition of Western culture has slowly but steadily been eclipsed by a new way of viewing spirituality. This shift has been in the making for some three hundred years. James A. Herrick tells the story of how the old view has been dismantled and a new one created not primarily through academic or institutional channels but by means of popular religious media-books. The Making of the New Spirituality: The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition Paperback – January 2, 2005. by. Herrick (Author).

The Judeo-Christian tradition of Western culture has slowly but steadily been eclipsed by a new way of viewing spirituality. This shift has been in the making for some three hundred years Many welcome this evolution of religion. However, few are familiar with its roots, and fewer still have critically examined its prospects. As we stand at a spiritual crossroad, Herrick questions whether we are wise to discard the Western religious tradition and adopt the new spirituality. This shift has been in the making for some three hundred years Although the new spirituality is diffuse and eclectic in its sources and manifestations, Herrick demonstrates a significant convergence of ideas, beliefs, assumptions, convictions and images in the myriad ways this New Religious Synthesis makes its way into our culture. In fact, the new spirituality, says Herrick, directly calls into question each major tenet of Judeo-Christian tradition and so represents a radical alternative to it.

The Making of the New Spirituality. Herrick Downers Grove, IL 2004-12-15. The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition. Herrick is Guy VanderJagt professor of communication at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. In this book he surveys the history and various representatives of what he terms the new religious synthesis.

book by James A. Herrick. A 2004 ECPA Gold Medallion Finalist! One of Preaching magazine's 2004 Top Ten Books Every Preacher Should Read! Neo-paganism.

Exploring the historical trajectory of sacred discourse, Herrick reveals the roots of other beliefs and assesses their implications on human happiness. 331 pages, softcover from InterVarsity. The Making of the New Spirituality: The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition (9780830832798) by James A. Herrick, The Making of the New Spirituality: The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition. Ill: InterVarsity Press, 2003. movements as those analyzed by Herrick?

The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition.

The Eclipse of the Western Religious Tradition. The Making of the New Spirituality.

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A 2004 ECPA Gold Medallion Finalist! One of Preaching magazine's 2004 "Top Ten Books Every Preacher Should Read"! Neo-paganism. The paranormal. Astrology. Nature religion. Holistic thinking. Healing. New Age. New spirituality. A massive shift in Western religious attitudes has taken place almost without our noticing it. The Judeo-Christian tradition of Western culture has slowly but steadily been eclipsed by a new way of viewing spirituality. This shift has been in the making for some three hundred years. James A. Herrick tells the story of how the old view has been dismantled and a new one created not primarily through academic or institutional channels but by means of popular religious media--books, speeches, magazines and pamphlets, as well as movies, plays, music, radio interviews, television programs and websites. Although the new spirituality is diffuse and eclectic in its sources and manifestations, Herrick demonstrates a significant convergence of ideas, beliefs, assumptions, convictions and images in the myriad ways this New Religious Synthesis makes its way into our culture. In fact, the new spirituality, says Herrick, directly calls into question each major tenet of Judeo-Christian tradition and so represents a radical alternative to it. Interest in spirituality increases while participation in institutional religion wanes. Many welcome this evolution of religion. However, few are familiar with its roots, and fewer still have critically examined its prospects. As we stand at a spiritual crossroad, Herrick questions whether we are wise to discard the Western religious tradition and adopt the new spirituality.

unmasked
Great sections of how religion has transfigured over time.
Delagamand
Herrick is to be commended for addressing the topic of how the New Spirituality came about and has challenged traditional models of Christianity (evangelicalism in particular), but in this reviewer's opinion his work falls short. His analysis and discussion of the people and organizations that he does discuss are often shallow and too brief. And there are other people and groups who have played a vital role in the development of new spirituality who are not discussed at all. For evangelicals this book is perhaps better than nothing, but readers looking for a more thorough study will most likely have to look beyond this book.
Doomblade
A book every Christian should read
Hǻrley Quinn
I believe that this was well written. But again, as in many other cases, it simply explores the problems. Surely authors have opinions too.
Carrot
I agree with BC Lion's review - while presented as a scholarly nonfiction work, in reality The Making of the New Spirituality is spin for fundamental Christianity. As soon as I came to the part on A Course in Miracles, I knew where Herrick was going with this book. His remarks about the Course showed bias and ignorance. As he flippantly declared the Course "nearly incomprehensible prose," I wondered at his own mental faculties for understand abstract concepts. But I also immediately knew where he stood - firmly in authoritarian, old-timey, fundamental Christianity and that the entire rest of the book was going to be shadowed by his own bias. While he certainly listed many steps over the centuries to the "other spirituality" and knew his "facts," he was incapable of understanding the spirit of the changes, the deeply meaningful experiences that people have when engaging in some of these "other spiritualities" that are, for many, sorely lacking in traditional mindless and narrowly focused ritual. At this point, I skipped ahead to the end to see his "conclusion" and sure enough, he proved what I suspected. Hey, it's my fault that I didn't read BC Lion's review before wasting my money on this book.
Bine
We can't see the forest for the trees. Scholars of religious movements have generally obsessed with what has been called the catalog approach to their subject matter, emphasizing fine points of difference between groups. We fail to step back and notice the similarities. Too few scholars have done so, but upon thoughtful inspection, one can see that (to switch metaphors) we are just looking at different branches on one tree. Getting this perspective is extremely valuable. I won't say Herrick's book is the definitive work on the subject which leaves nothing more to be said, but I do think it is probably the best of its kind yet published. I have little patience with anyone who would raise the "guilt by association" bugaboo with respect to this writing. The guilt by association fallacy is a real one that is found too often these days, but Herrick does not fall into this trap. Put bluntly, I think anyone who would accuse Herrick of this fallacy is weak in higher order thinking skills. Herrick's conclusion is that we are confronted with essentially two choices in religious movements: those that are part of the religious synthesis in opposition to Christ (otherwise known as the spirit of antichrist) and the revealed word which points us to Christ. Because of the density of the information Herrick includes, the book does read a little slowly. Those who evaluate their reading material solely by its entertainment value may want to pass on this important work.
Xcorn
The Making of the New Spirituality is an informative survey of western religious ideas and how they have evolved over the past few centuries. It is also a rather sad survey in that it chronicles a steady erosion of what the author calls the "Revealed Word" view (essentially Christian orthodoxy) as various new notions of spirituality have overtaken that view and in some instances crept into the church. The author did a huge amount of research to pull together all of the ideas and information contained in the book.

As I read, I had several recurring thoughts:

First, I was struck by how many proponents of the various new views rejected the Revealed Word view on the basis of reason, modern criticism, science, etc., and then set up in its place something less scientific, less reasonable, more subjective, more mystical, more speculative, etc. The inconsistency was often glaring.

Second, I was struck by the vehemence of the opposition to the Revealed Word view and the apparent readiness of the masses to cast off that view and adopt other views. I've wondered a lot about the causes of this vehemence. The possibilities, some of which the author himself raises, include: the appeal of novelty; the appeal of intellectual or spiritual fads; a desire to believe in the innate goodness and progress of mankind; resentment of Christianity's truth claims; a desire to shed moral absolutes; a "burned over," spiritually weary mindset that existed in some places; and the manner in which the church conducted herself and represented (or misrepresented) Christ.

Third, I found myself wondering whether anyone in the church was effectively replying to the various new notions of spirituality and religious truth. I kept wanting to hear the Christian response -- either then or now. In this regard the last chapter of the book, which points out the deficiencies of the various new spiritualities as compared to the Revealed Word view, was a welcome ending.