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by Ludwig W. Adamec
Download The A to Z of Islam (The A to Z Guide Series) fb2
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  • Author:
    Ludwig W. Adamec
  • ISBN:
    0810871602
  • ISBN13:
    978-0810871601
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scarecrow Press; Second edition (September 2, 2009)
  • Pages:
    520 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1734 kb
  • ePUB format
    1202 kb
  • DJVU format
    1109 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    734
  • Formats:
    lit txt doc rtf


Ludwig W. Adamec is widely known as a leading authority on Afghanistan. Series: The A to Z Guide Series (Book 1).

Ludwig W. He is a professor at the University of Arizona and has served as the director of the Near Eastern Center for ten years. He is the author of 24 volumes and numerous articles and monographs.

The A to Z of Islam presents a concise overview of Islamic history, religion, philosophy, and Islamic political movements. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and cross-referenced dictionary entries, which include the biographies and thoughts of medieval thinkers, as well as those of modern members of the religious and political establishments. Articles describe the major sects, schools of theology, and jurisprudence, as well as aspects of Islamic culture. Together, this book represents a brief introduction to the field of Islamic studies.

The A to Z of Islam book. There is both unity and variety in the Islamic world.

There is both unity and variety in the Islamic world

There is both unity and variety in the Islamic world  . No commitment, cancel anytime.

Together, this book represents a brief introduction to the field of Islamic studies.

Read The A to Z of Islam, by Ludwig W. Adamec online on Bookmate – There is both unity and variety in the Islamic world. Muslims differ vastly in their interpretation of Islam: modernists want to reinterpret Islam to adapt to the requirements of modern times while traditionalists tend to look to the classical and medieval periods of Islam as their model of the Islamic state. The A to Z of Islam presents a concise overview of Islamic history, religion, philosophy, and Islamic political movements.

It consists of the American involvement in Afghanistan since October 2001 as well as individual campaigns, including tactics and logistics of skirmishes, the weapons used, and biographical entries on the significant leaders involved in the battles. Articles describe the major sects, schools of theology, and jurisprudence, as well as aspects of Islamic culture Год: 2009.

The A to Z of Prophets in Islam and Judaism (The A to Z Guide Series) by Scott B. Noegel Both traditions recognize and draw t. Other Products from bygone-binds(View All). Rose Water and Orange Blossoms Fresh & Classic Recipes from my Lebanese Kitchen.

The A to Z Guide Series. Livre 123. Ludwig W. Adamec2 sánzá ya libwa 2009. Adamec (10 March 1924 – 1 January 2019) was a noted scholar on the Middle East and Afghanistan. He was a professor emeritus in the School of Middle East and North African Studies at the University of Arizona

Ludwig W. He was a professor emeritus in the School of Middle East and North African Studies at the University of Arizona.

There is both unity and variety in the Islamic world. Muslims are not a homogeneous people who can be explained solely by their normative texts: the Koran and the Sunnah. Muslims differ vastly in their interpretation of Islam: modernists want to reinterpret Islam to adapt to the requirements of modern times while traditionalists tend to look to the classical and medieval periods of Islam as their model of the Islamic state.The A to Z of Islam presents a concise overview of Islamic history, religion, philosophy, and Islamic political movements. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and cross-referenced dictionary entries, which include the biographies and thoughts of medieval thinkers, as well as those of modern members of the religious and political establishments. Articles describe the major sects, schools of theology, and jurisprudence, as well as aspects of Islamic culture. Together, this book represents a brief introduction to the field of Islamic studies.

Nagis
"The A to Z of Islam" by Ludwig Adamec (2nd ed. 2009), in English, 459 pgs. CAUTION!! Besides having different intro press-release info & ISBNs, this book is EXACTLY the same as the author's "Historical Dictionary of Islam" (2nd ed. 2009)!!! "A-Z" ISBN is 978-0-8108-7160-1 (paperback), whereas "Dictionary" is 978-0-8108-6161-9 (cloth) - SAME # of pages, SAME text !!! Highly Recommended. What I really like about this (encyclopedia) book is its many pages (343 pages) of wide-breadth scope of Islamic-related topics. Sadly, only 75% of the pages are devoted to Islamic-encyclopedic use; with the remaining quarter being a `Bibliography' of books pertaining to many Islamic-related topics - nonetheless, this book would still be useful even if its Bibliography had been excluded. Sadly, many other `popular' Islamic-related encyclopedias are short (less than 200 pages). This book covers many (short) topics: ghazw, muhtasib, economics, wahy, Nizariyyah, 'Year of Deputations', politics: Mirza Sultan-Galiev, history, Wasil ibn Ata, legal, government, millat, individuals, mihna, 'the White Streak', Islamist groups, even `Londonistan'. Other likeable aspects include that whatever topic is discussed it will very frequently include the appropriate Arabic word. If I recall my youthful Sunday School teachings, Jews consider the Prophet Abraham (Ibrahim) as being Jewish; the author contends that Abraham was not (p. 10) - but that he was just a monotheist. Of relevance here is that the author does not state that Muslims consider Abraham to be a Muslim, and the entire Issac/Ishmael "oldest son" dispute is overlooked as to whether the Jews or Muslims are to have primary ownership of Israel-Palestine. The author sees `devshirme' of Christian boys as a `levy' rather than enslavement (p. 82). The author maintains that Muhammad married Jewish and Christian female captives for `political reasons' rather than lustful (p.330). Doesn't really `critique' Islamic beliefs. Still -- informative. [Also worthy: "Islamic Desk Reference" by van Donzel; "A Glossary of Islamic Terminology" by B.S. Abughosh.]
Reemiel
"The A to Z of Islam" by Ludwig Adamec (2nd ed. 2009), in English, 459 pgs. CAUTION!! Besides having different intro press-release info & ISBNs, this book is EXACTLY the same as the author's "Historical Dictionary of Islam" (2nd ed. 2009)!!! "A-Z" ISBN is 978-0-8108-7160-1 (paperback), whereas "Dictionary" is 978-0-8108-6161-9 (cloth) - SAME # of pages, SAME text !!! Highly Recommended. What I really like about this (encyclopedia) book is its many pages (343 pages) of wide-breadth scope of Islamic-related topics. Sadly, only 75% of the pages are devoted to Islamic-encyclopedic use; with the remaining quarter being a `Bibliography' of books pertaining to many Islamic-related topics - nonetheless, this book would still be useful even if its Bibliography had been excluded. Sadly, many other `popular' Islamic-related encyclopedias are short (less than 200 pages). This book covers many (short) topics: ghazw, muhtasib, economics, wahy, Nizariyyah, 'Year of Deputations', politics: Mirza Sultan-Galiev, history, Wasil ibn Ata, legal, government, millat, individuals, mihna, 'the White Streak', Islamist groups, even `Londonistan'. Other likeable aspects include that whatever topic is discussed it will very frequently include the appropriate Arabic word. If I recall my youthful Sunday School teachings, Jews consider the Prophet Abraham (Ibrahim) as being Jewish; the author contends that Abraham was not (p. 10) - but that he was just a monotheist. Of relevance here is that the author does not state that Muslims consider Abraham to be a Muslim, and the entire Issac/Ishmael "oldest son" dispute is overlooked as to whether the Jews or Muslims are to have primary ownership of Israel-Palestine. The author sees `devshirme' of Christian boys as a `levy' rather than enslavement (p. 82). The author maintains that Muhammad married Jewish and Christian female captives for `political reasons' rather than lustful (p.330). Doesn't really `critique' Islamic beliefs. Still -- informative. [Also worthy: "Islamic Desk Reference" by van Donzel; "A Glossary of Islamic Terminology" by B.S. Abughosh.]