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by William B. Prendergast
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  • Author:
    William B. Prendergast
  • ISBN:
    0878407243
  • ISBN13:
    978-0878407248
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Georgetown University Press (May 17, 1999)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1492 kb
  • ePUB format
    1984 kb
  • DJVU format
    1477 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    105
  • Formats:
    mbr txt lrf doc


William B. Prendergast analyzes the relationship between Catholics and the GOP from the 1840s to 1990s.

William B. He documents a developing attachment of Catholics to Republican candidates beginning early in this century and shows that, before Kennedy, Catholics helped elect Eisenhower, returned to the polls in support of Nixon and Reagan, and voted for a Republican Congress in 1994.

The Passing of the Democratic Monolith. William B. By Mary E. Prendergast. Georgetown University Press. Once a keystone of the Democratic Party, American Catholics are today helping to put Republicans in office. This book traces changes in party allegiance and voting behavior of Catholics in national elections over the course of 150 years and explains why much of the voting bloc that supported John F. Kennedy has deserted the Democratic coalition.

The Catholic Voter in American Politics: The Passing of the Democratic Monolith. Prendergast has mobilized an impressive array of data in support of this thesis, but even readers not quite convinced or wishing to qualify it even further will find this a useful and readable synthesis of much secondary literature. The steady rhythm of presidential elections and the relentless rain of numbers and percentages occasionally induce drowsiness, but Prendergast knew the power of a good story, a colorful character, a memorable quote, or an apt example to put flesh and blood onto the election returns.

Voter in American Politics : The Passing of the Democratic Monolith.

The Catholic Voter in American Politics : The Passing of the Democratic Monolith. by William B.

William Prendergast, The Catholic Voter in American Politics: The Passing of the Democratic Monolith (Washington . Georgetown, 1999), p. 21. oogle Scholar. 4. R. Ward Holder and Peter B. Josephson, The Irony Of Barack Obama: Barack Obama, Reinhold Niebuhr and the Problem of Christian Statecraft (Burlington, Vt; Ashgate, 2012), p. 17. 5. Gary Dorrien, The Obama Question: A Progressive Perspective (New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2012), p. 22. 7. Second Vatican Council, Gaudium et spes, in Catholic Social Thought: The Documentary Heritage, ed.

The role of Catholics in American culture and elections changed .

The role of Catholics in American culture and elections changed dramatically as a result of the mass immigration of Catholics from Europe, especially Germany and Ireland. By 1840, there were about 600,000 Catholics in the United States. In the 1840s, 200,000 Irish immigrated to escape poverty Religious lines were sharply drawn in the North in the Third Party System that lasted from the 1850s to the 1890s. In the North, about 50% of the voters were pietistic Protestants who believed the government should be used to reduce social sins, such as drinking.

Prendergast, William B. (1999) The Catholic voter in American politics :the passing of the Democratic monolith Washington, . Georgetown University Press

Prendergast, William B. Georgetown University Press, MLA Citation. Prendergast, William B. The Catholic Voter In American Politics: The Passing Of The Democratic Monolith. Georgetown University Press, 1999.

Prendergast, William . Prendergast, Mary E. (1999). In this ambitious book, Smith presents a new model for social theory that does justice to the best of our humanistic visions of people, life, and society

The Catholic Voter in American Politics: The Passing of the Democratic Monolith. Mater et magister, in Catholic Social Thought: The Documentary Heritage NY: Orbis, 1998), paragraph 132; United States Catholic Bishops, Economic Justice for All, in Catholic Social Thought: The Documentary Heritage. In this ambitious book, Smith presents a new model for social theory that does justice to the best of our humanistic visions of people, life, and society. Finding much current thinking on personhood to be confusing or misleading, Smith finds inspiration in critical realism and personalism.

Once a keystone of the Democratic Party, American Catholics are today helping to put Republicans in office. This book traces changes in party allegiance and voting behavior of Catholics in national elections over the course of 150 years and explains why much of the voting bloc that supported John F. Kennedy has deserted the Democratic coalition.William B. Prendergast analyzes the relationship between Catholics and the GOP from the 1840s to 1990s. He documents a developing attachment of Catholics to Republican candidates beginning early in this century and shows that, before Kennedy, Catholics helped elect Eisenhower, returned to the polls in support of Nixon and Reagan, and voted for a Republican Congress in 1994.To account for this shifting allegiance, Prendergast analyzes transformations in the Catholic population, the parties, and the political environment. He attributes these changes to the Americanization of immigrants, the socioeconomic and educational advancement of Catholics, and the emergence of new issues. He also cites the growth of ecumenicism, the influence of Vatican II, the abatement of Catholic-Protestant hostility, and the decline of anti-Catholicism in the Republican party.Clearly demonstrating a Catholic move toward political independence, Prendergast's work reveals both the realignment of voters and the influence of religious beliefs in the political arena. Provocative and informative, it confirms the opinion of pollsters that no candidate can take the vote of the largest and most diverse religious group in the nation for granted.