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by Eugen Weber
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  • Author:
    Eugen Weber
  • ISBN:
    0674040805
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674040809
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (May 10, 1999)
  • Pages:
    302 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
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    1163 kb
  • ePUB format
    1996 kb
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    1554 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    778
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Eugen Weber appropriately begins his book on apocalypses with a discussion of chronologies and the . Too dry for my tastes.

Eugen Weber appropriately begins his book on apocalypses with a discussion of chronologies and the fin de siecle for, as he discusses, time is a social construct and the nature of fin de siecles is dependent upon this. The differing perspectives of time and the way we view historical events is the jumping off point for his discussion of the views and beliefs of people over the years regarding the end times. Jul 03, 2011 Josh rated it liked it.

Eugen Weber delivered the Barbara Frum Historical Lecture, based on Apocalypses, at the University of Toronto in March 1999. This annual lecture "on a subject of contemporary history in historical perspective" was established in memory of Barbara Frum. Prophecies, Cults and Millennial Beliefs through the Ages. The Barbara Frum Historical Lectureship. A national bestseller

Weber, Eugen, 1925-2007.

Weber, Eugen, 1925-2007. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Apocalyptic visions and prophecies from Zarathustra to yesterday form the luxuriant panorama in Eugen Weber's profound .

Apocalyptic visions and prophecies from Zarathustra to yesterday form the luxuriant panorama in Eugen Weber's profound and elegant book. Beginning with the ancients of the West and the Orient and, especially, with those from whom we received our religions, the Jews and earliest Christians, Weber finds that an absolute belief in the end of time, when good would do final battle with evil, was omnipresent. As we approach our second millennium beset by a host of apocalyptic predictions and cults, this book offers a map of understanding of the creeds we ignore at our peril.

by. Eugen Weber (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. ISBN-13: 978-0756753146.

Weber's "apocalypses," so many and so varied, are impossible to arrange chronologically, theologically, or. .

Weber's "apocalypses," so many and so varied, are impossible to arrange chronologically, theologically, or socially on a single spectrum. At numerous points in the book the question arose: "Should this really be included as an apocalypse or millennial vision?" But again and again the author convinces. A salient feature of Weber's treatment is that, contrary to Norman Cohn, apocalyptic and millennial visions were developed and promoted not by the oppressed and disinherited of the earth, but by elites in every period.

Weber writes with a great sense of humor, which keeps this book from being completely mind-numbing. Its not the subject that is monotonous, but the overwhelming number of movements covered

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Random House Publishing GroupReleased: Sep 21, 2011ISBN: 9780307366184Format: book. Apocalypses - Eugen Weber.

Cults and Millennial Beliefs Throughout the Ages, by Eugen Weber. Similar books and articles. Imperial Cult S. J. Friesen: Imperial Cults and the Apocalypse of John. Max Weber and the Social Sciences in America.

Apocalypse Pretty Soon: Travels in End-Time America, by Alex Heard; and Apocalypses: Prophecies, Cults and Millennial Beliefs Throughout the Ages, by Eugen Weber. An Introduction to the Study of Saxon Settlement in Transylvania During the Middle Ages. Eugen Weber - 1956 - Mediaeval Studies 18 (1):50-60. The Apocalypse and Imperial Cult S. Reading Revelation in the Ruins Max Weber and the Social Sciences in America. Lawrence A. Scaff - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):121-132.

Weber, a master storyteller, turns detective in this latest book as he finds these alternative rationalities in the .

Weber, a master storyteller, turns detective in this latest book as he finds these alternative rationalities in the West, Asia, Africa, and South America. He writes with profound respect for the millennial pulse in history while never losing his urbane and witty style of writing. Eugen Weber is Joan Palevsky Professor of Modern European History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Apocalyptic visions and prophecies from Zarathustra to yesterday form the luxuriant panorama in Eugen Weber's profound and elegant book. Beginning with the ancients of the West and the Orient and, especially, with those from whom we received our religions, the Jews and earliest Christians, Weber finds that an absolute belief in the end of time, when good would do final battle with evil, was omnipresent. Within centuries, apocalyptic beliefs inspired Crusades, scientific discoveries, works of art, voyages such as those of Columbus, rebellions and reforms. In the new world, American abolitionists, who were so critical to the movement to end slavery, believed in a final reckoning. The nineteenth and twentieth centuries' apocalyptic movements veered toward a lunatic fringe, and Weber rescues them from obloquy. From this more than two millennia history, he redresses the historical and religious amnesia that has consigned the study of apocalypses and millennial thought to the ash heap of thought and belief.

Weber, a master storyteller, turns detective in this latest book as he finds these alternative rationalities in the West, Asia, Africa, and South America. He writes with profound respect for the millennial pulse in history while never losing his urbane and witty style of writing. As we approach our second millennium beset by a host of apocalyptic predictions and cults, this book offers a map of understanding of the creeds we ignore at our peril.


Wen
This book is an introduction to Western European and American apocalypticism. It jumps around pretty freely, although it is roughly organized into time periods.

What I'll say about this book is, if you've read a bit of history already, it will be enjoyable to you. But if you want a serious, careful and scholarly history of apocalypticism, this will disappoint you, as it did one reviewer. No phenomenon is explored in any depth, but the narrative moves quickly through a lot of fascinating history. I did appreciate the author's care with dates, since that made it easier to keep up with the narrative's jumping around.

My field is religious studies, although not exactly what is covered here. Nevertheless, I learned enough from this book to begin doubting some "conventional wisdom" about apocalypticism: for instance, that around the year 1000 there was a wild outbreak of enthusiasm. On the contrary, most people didn't know what year it was. But I also learned that apocalypticism has gone on pretty much constantly in Western Christianity, often despite the official churches' attempts to control it.

Depending on your situation, you of course will find something else in it.

I also want to add that, as I read this book, I continually wondered why this fascinating material is rarely covered in more general histories of Western Christianity. Whatever the reason, I strongly recommend this book to students of Western Christian history. I don't think enough people are famliar with this part of Christian history.

But let me recommend a couple other books for you to consider before you pick this up.

One is Paul Boyer's "When Time Shall be no More," which looks at apocalypticism in America very closely; if you're more interested in this than in European history, that'll be a better book for you. This is a book that I very strongly recommend to anyone who wants to understand religion in America.

Another is Norman Cohn's "Cosmos, Chaos and the World to Come," which (also very briefly) covers the origins of apocalypticism in the ancient world. Very few people could read this book without learning something about Zoroastrianism, 2nd Temple Judaism, or early Christianity.
Aver
Review by Marianne Luban:
When the Year 1000 was drawing near, people took it as an omen when Halley's Comet streaked across the heavens. Did this portend Doomsday or the advent of the Messiah? Was Man marching inexorably into the dusk or the dawn? Another thousand years later, we still don't positively know the answer to that question.
The eminent historian, Eugen Weber, delivers his latest work, "Apocalypses", just in time to ponder our status on the brink of the new millennium and to give us insight into the hopes and fears of previous generations who found themselves hesitating before the looming gateway of a new era, weighing prophecies or confronted with phenomena consisting of "lamps of fire, angels, plagues, lightenings, thunderings, earthquakes, falling stars, fire, blood, hail, black sun and bloody moon". Weber writes: "When the world ends, it could be argued that all that ends is the world we know. The end of the world was really only the end of one world, not the end of time but of our time, not the annihilation of mankind but the end of a way of life and its replacement by another."
While some contemplated finales, optimists dreamed and wrote of their hopes for an enlightened, repentant world and the regeneration of the human race: "They speak, earth, ocean, air; I hear them say 'Awake, repent, 'ere we dissolve away!" Yet others faced the unknown and dire forebodings armed with their wit. According to Weber, when Pope Benedict XIV was informed that the AntiChrist had come and was now three years old, the pontiff quipped, "Then I shall leave the problem to my successor."
Eugen Weber must be the world's most fascinating conversationalist. One gets the impression, from reading "Apocalypses", that he has the entire saga of mankind stored in his marvel of a brain and can conjure up imagery, names, anecdotes and dates from it with the same fluency that some of us have when writing a chatty postcard home, describing an exciting day in a far-away locale. This is not to imply that, although Weber's style is urbane and witty, that "Apocalypses" is an easy read. It is not. Eugen Weber is never ponderous, but he makes it plain that he is first and foremost an historian and only secondarily a raconteur. Or perhaps thirdly, because Weber as philosopher is also very much a presence in the book. In fact, it is his own thoughts and comments that leave the most lingering impressions, reminding us that, while the deeds of Man are fleeting, it is his "death-defying thoughts", set down on paper, that are like the nacreous bits of shell that remain gleaming on the beach after the great tides of history have flooded and ebbed. For an academic, Eugen Weber is a very good writer, indeed.
How different our "fin de siecle" seems from bygone chronological milestones. No longer moved by superstition and too jaded for optimism, we await the Millennium with a kind of dull signation. Our popular heroes are all dead or aging and nobody has emerged to replace them. The close of the century seems characterized by vapidity, greed and a lack of concern for the health of the planet we call home. Could there be a more fitting commentary on the status quo than that our direst prophecy for the Year 2000 concerns the imminent failure of the Machine, upon which we have formed such a frightening dependency? Eugen Weber doesn't have an email address. Perhaps he never will. Intellectually speaking, his address is the universe, his understanding cosmic. Doubtless he would like to offer greater comfort, but the honest scholar can only counsel, while commenting on the recent trend toward apocalyptic films and literature: "Adversity is good for faith, and adversity is ever present. Ages of decadence always suggest an end; few ages have not struck their contemporaries by their decadence" and "We suffer and suffering is catastrophic, sometimes unbearable, sometimes final....We yearn for some explosive, extraordinary escape from the inescapable and, none forthcoming, we put our faith in an apocalyptic rupture whereby the inevitable is solved by the unbelievable...in the end, salvation from sin and evil--meaning anxiety, travail and pain."
Marianne Luban is a freelance writer living in Minnesota. Her short fiction collection, "The Samaritan Treasure", is published by Coffee House Press
Dark_Sun
I can't argue with the fact that Mr Weber knows his subjectl. The problem is that the book is so full of examples, that it makes for a very difficult and painful read. There is no flow, no voice, just examples. And I mean multiple examples in one paragraph.

There is no real, readable, narrative analysis, just a compression of facts and other information. This would have been better off as a bibliography and not an attempt at an actual book.

If I was to make a positive comment, I would say this is perhaps better better as a research source, rather than as a standard narrative. So, in that sense, it might prove useful to those who might track or otherwise seek to compile data on the myriad apocalypse-based groups, cults, etc.