» » Hitler and the Vatican: Inside the Secret Archives That Reveal the New Story of the Nazis and the Church

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by Peter Godman
Download Hitler and the Vatican: Inside the Secret Archives That Reveal the New Story of the Nazis and the Church fb2
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  • Author:
    Peter Godman
  • ISBN:
    0743245970
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743245975
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Free Press (March 16, 2004)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    World
  • Language:
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    1501 kb
  • ePUB format
    1470 kb
  • DJVU format
    1607 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    831
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This book gives a very good look at the Vatican and its failure to condemn Hitler.

Documentary history is a poor guide to 'thoughts and motives of the actors involved', so the outcome falls necessarily falls short of the author's ambition. This book gives a very good look at the Vatican and its failure to condemn Hitler. Of course hindsight is 20-20 but even so, there were many indications between 1920-1935 of the danger to moral authority that Facism was bringing to the world scene.

Be like the sun for grace and mercy. Be like the night to cover others' faults. This new book, "Applications in Dietary Assessment", provides guidance to nutrition and heal. Be like running water for generosity. Be like death for rage and anger. Be like the Earth for modesty. He has tested these concepts with 200. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter.

Hitler and the Vatican book. In February 2003, the Vatican opened its archives for the crucial years of the Nazi consolidation of power, up until 1939

Hitler and the Vatican book. In February 2003, the Vatican opened its archives for the crucial years of the Nazi consolidation of power, up until 1939. Peter Godman, thanks to his long experience in Vatican sources and his reputation as an impartial, non-Catholic historian of the Church, was one of the first scholars to explore the new documents. The story they tell is revelatory and surprising and forces a major revision of the history of the 1930s.

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Peter Godman of the University of Rome, a scholar who has studied the Catholic Church, was one of the first people granted permission to mine the recently opened archives of the Supreme Congregation of the Holy Office for the pontificate of Pius XI (1922-39). In keeping with the times, the Holy Office currently bears the less forbidding name of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith; it was once known as the Universal Inquisition. Headed by bishops and cardinals, the Congregation pronounces on doctrine in matters of faith and morals.

For years, the policies of the Catholic Church during the rise and terribly destructive rule of the Nazis have .

For years, the policies of the Catholic Church during the rise and terribly destructive rule of the Nazis have been controversial. Pope Pius XII has been attacked as "Hitler's Pope," an anti-Semitic enabler who refused to condemn Nazism, much less urge Catholics to resist the German regime.

GenEthx: Genetics and Ethics Database. Bibliographic Citation. New York: Free Press, 2004. GenEthx: Genetics and Ethics Database. Some features of this site may not work without it. Hitler and the vatican: inside the secret archives that reveal the new story of the nazis and the church.

The story of how and why the Catholic Church planned to condemn the Nazis, and of what became of those .

The story of how and why the Catholic Church planned to condemn the Nazis, and of what became of those plans, sheds new light on the inner workings of the Vatican on the eve of the Second World Wa.

Finally, the full story of the Church and the Nazis can be told, thanks .

Finally, the full story of the Church and the Nazis can be told, thanks to the historic opening of the Vatican's most secret and controversial archives. 3 people like this topic.

zip For years, the policies of the Catholic Church during the rise and terribly destructive rule of the Nazis have been controversial. The Church has been accused of standing by while the Nazis steadily revealed their evil.

Documents the controversial relationship between the Catholic Church and the Nazis, citing how a communist-wary Vatican maintained a policy of non-interference in Nazi persecutions and withheld crucial information about Nazi activities. 50,000 first printing.

Xinetan
This book attempts to «to penetrate behind the scenes of what seemed a closed world [of the Vatican], to examine the thoughts and motives of the men who formulated policy at the head of the Church, and to consider both the actions they and the courses they chose not to follow» (pg. xv). In other words, to write history «wie es wirklich war», as it really was, to use Ranke's description of documentary history. Godman had access to the Vatican archives, and felt in a position to show the inner workings of a spiritual institution as it confronted the Nazi ideological and political threat.

Documentary history is a poor guide to 'thoughts and motives of the actors involved', so the outcome falls necessarily falls short of the author's ambition. After reading the book one is no closer to knowing why certain decisions were taken, and opportunities missed, than at the beginning. There are no 'smoking guns' in the Vatican Archives: positive evidence that Eugenio Pacelli (later Pius XII), was 'Hitler's Pope', or that the Vatican was a 'cove of anti-Semites'. The pattern that emerges, however, is one no less damning: it is pattern of administrative bungling, wishful thinking, procrastination, and in the end, ineptness. «Rotten compromises», to use Margalit's (On Compromise and Rotten Compromises) definition, were struck by the bucketful, or if one prefers: It was a clear case of Tuchman's March of Folly (The March of Folly: From Troy to Vietnam).

John Cornwell's accusation of Eugenio Pacelli centres around the fact that the Vatican signed a Concordat soon after Hitler, his hands still dripping blood, had grasped power in Germany. Surprisingly, Godman fails properly to explain what drove the Vatican's policy in the face of such obvious facts. That Pacelli's influential predecessor Gasparri, was in favour, or that Pius XI was «prepared to negotiate with the devil, if it were a question of saving souls» - showing a Churchillian consequentalist streak - is not good enough. The Pacelli that emerges from the book is one of an overly cautious bureaucrat, never fully using even the limited degrees of freedom he had at his disposal: correct, cautious, opportunist to a fault, his fault was «excess of prudence or lack of courage» (pg. 74) - yet he did take action in 1933. All other bungling was to flow from that action.

The archival studies show clearly that - albeit at a leisurely pace - the Vatican's Holy Office did ruminate the issue of condemning Nazi ideology. After 'nudism' ('naturism' would have been the better word) had been disposed of, for this was the Holy Office's most pressing concern as Hitler rose to power, it got around to studying the ideological foundations of Nazism. It did a good job at that - behind hermetically sealed doors. But in the end it became the victim of its own ambition. By following insider counsel of perfection and trying to conflate Communism, Fascism, and Nazism in one swell ideological swoop of condemnation it failed to act altogether.

Godman tries to lay some of the blame for this bungling at Pius XI's door. In fits and starts, however, the man did try to confront Nazism, and in the end, on his death bed, he did publish «Mit brennender Sorge», the only Vatican uttering on the matter, just as in 1931 he had published «Non abbiamo bisogno» against Mussolini. And he did order a diplomatic intervention in favour of the Jews. It would have been Pacelli's job to build a policy on such occasional yet consistent prodding. He did not.

Godman casts out for a villain, and finds him in Alois Hudal, an Austrian titular bishop, whom at one point Hitler wanted to appoint «Court Theologian of the Nazi Party». Hudal if anyone, argues Godman, was the «appeaser», forever dreaming of cleansing the Nazi Party of its «radical left», and finding an accommodation with the «conservatives» to fight Communism. Hudal was a two-bit actor at the margin of the Vatican bureaucracy. If he did have some influence in the Holy Office in the beginning, Godman fails to show him on the bridge as the Vatican Ship ploughed through treacherous theological waters.

Hudal's fate unwittingly proves the case against the Vatican and Pacelli. Here was clear insubordination by a marginal figure, whose main role was to be the head of Santa Maria dell'Anima - the «German national church at Rome». The high sounding title belies the political irrelevance of the outfit. It was the place for German Catholics in Rome to gather and pray in their national language, and for the German Bishops to stay when in Rome. Godman never shows that the German Bishops ever bothered to involve Hudal in their dealings with the Vatican, or vice versa, that his titular superior, Cardinal Pacelli, ever employed him in a political role. Hudal after the war seems to have helped Eichmann escape, and was finally ousted from Anima in 1952 "under Allied pressure" (pg. 170).

Condemnation of Hudal's books, or even quiet removal from Anima, would have been unobtrusive signals that the Vatican was not trying to «appease» Hitler. Munich's Cardinal Faulhaber had accused him of «stabbing the German Bishops in the back», yet he failed to get this obnoxious busybody out of the way. Pius XI, whom Godman wants to be non-indicted co-conspirator in the Vatican's inaction before WWII, did suggest putting Hudal's book on the Index. Pacelli toned down the punishment to a short note in the Osservatore Romano, indicating that the book had not been previously authorised by the Church. Such was the prudence of Pacelli.

Pacelli's behaviour prior to WWII is a good indicator of his moral courage during the war. In its two thousand years of reign the Church had outlived all its opponents. Pacelli called it «persistent martyrdom of patience» - others may have a different opinion. As a strategy it certainly served the Church well, if at the price of moral leadership. Whatever Pius XII's «values» - to use a much overused term - he did agree to, or acquiesce in more than his share of «rotten compromises». That's a matter between him and God. Nothing, however, in Godman's book justifies him as saintly example to the world.
Funky
This book gives a very good look at the Vatican and its failure to condemn Hitler. Of course hindsight is 20-20 but even so, there were many indications between 1920-1935 of the danger to moral authority that Facism was bringing to the world scene. Certainly, Mussolini in Italy and Franco in Spain gave the world a glimpse of the terror that was coming to Europe. Perhaps one reason that the Pope did not attack Facism was its fear of Communism and the Left which was an even greater threat to churches and religion, this is also mentioned in the book. But the church has met many challenges in its long history, and is facing them today. What is best for the church is to take a firm stand on its principles of love for everyone, which I believe the current Pope will and is making.
Vonalij
All of a sudden it seems that a "cottage industry" of books on the subject of Pope Pius XII and the Nazis has arisen. There are the books that condemn him, and the Church by implication, for not doing more (or, in some books, anything) about the Nazi threat. There are others that state the Pope and the Church did all that it could, given the circumstances of the time. This book seems to fall somewhere in the middle, giving the reasons why more was not done, but also showing that, behind the scenes, many things were being planned that did not come to fruition. The reason for this appears to be that both Pius XI and his successor were concerned with the Concordat which had been signed by the Vatican and Nazi Germany, and they wished to avoid any action that might cause Hitler to abrogate it. While this may have made perfect sense to them, at this remove of time it appears to be rather short-sighted. It's difficult to condemn folks who acted more than 60 years ago, given what they knew of the situatuon in front of them. Hindsight is always 20-20, you know, so perhaps this book has the right approach, the middle ground necessary to allow us to see both sides of the questions before the Church leaders. It may not make them less suspect for their inaction, but it perhaps explains why they didn't do what we feel should have been done.