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by Adam Hook,Simon Millar
Download Rossbach and Leuthen 1757: Prussia's Eagle Resurgent (Campaign) fb2
Military
  • Author:
    Adam Hook,Simon Millar
  • ISBN:
    1841765090
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841765099
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Osprey Publishing (November 13, 2002)
  • Pages:
    96 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1994 kb
  • ePUB format
    1765 kb
  • DJVU format
    1886 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    943
  • Formats:
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This Osprey Campaign Series book examines the critical battles of Rossbach and Leuthen in 1757, as Frederick . I was hoping that Simon Millar's latest Osprey Campaign series title, Rossbach & Leuthen 1757, would be as good as his previous title, Kolin 1757.

This Osprey Campaign Series book examines the critical battles of Rossbach and Leuthen in 1757, as Frederick consecutively faced French and Austrian-led armies in Central Europe. The introduction includes a brief comparison of the opposing leaders and their armies. The heart of the narrative is the discussion of the battles of Rossbach in November 1757 and of Leuthen in December 1757.

Книга Osprey Campaign №113. Rossbach and Leuthen 1757 Книги Исторические Автор: . illar Формат: pdf Издат

Книга Osprey Campaign №113. Rossbach and Leuthen 1757 Osprey Campaign №113. illar Формат: pdf Издат.

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757 Osprey Campaign №113. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Lepanto 1571: The Greatest Naval Battle Of The Renaissance.

Prussia´s eagle resurgent - Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats . By the autumn of 1757 Frederick the Great was beset by enemies on all sides. The Emperor Napoleon considered Frederick’s lightning campaign ‘a masterpiece of manoeuvre and resolution’.

Prussia´s eagle resurgent - Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763). By the autumn of 1757 Frederick. The French had invaded the territory of his Anglo-Hanoverian allies, a Franco-Imperial army was threatening Saxony, an Austrian army 110,000-strong had marched into Silesia and even the ponderous Russians had moved against him. Then within a month Frederick transformed his fortunes. Millar, . Hook, A. (Illustr.

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757 book Original Title. Rossbach and Leuthen 1757: Prussia's Eagle Resurgent (Campaign). 1841765090 (ISBN13: 9781841765099).

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757 book. Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats during the Seven Years'. The Emperor Napoleon considered Frederick's lightning campaign 'a masterpiece of manoeuvre and resolution'.

Book in the Osprey Campaign Series). Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763)

Book in the Osprey Campaign Series). by Simon Millar and Adam Hook. Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763).

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757. Prussia's Eagle Resurgent. Campaign 113. Author: Simon Millar. Simon Millar was born in Malaysia in 1957. He joined the army in 1977 and having retired in 1994, subsequently rejoined his regiment, the Irish Guards, in 2001

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757. Illustrator: Adam Hook. He joined the army in 1977 and having retired in 1994, subsequently rejoined his regiment, the Irish Guards, in 2001. He is presently serving in Germany. He has previously written Kolin 1757 - Frederick the Great's first defeat in the Campaign series. Adam Hook studied graphic design, and began his work as an illustrator in 1983. He specialises in detailed historical reconstructions, and has illustrated Osprey titles on the Aztecs, the Greeks, the American Civil War and the American Revolution.

ISBN: 13: 978-1841765099. Osprey - - Lepanto 1571 The Greatest Naval Battle of the Renaissance. File: PDF, 4. 2 MB. 2. The Echo of Music (Kansas Crossroads File: EPUB, 124 KB. Распространяем знания с 2009.

Then within a month Frederick transformed his fortunes. At Rossbach on 5 November he smashed the Franco-Imperial army in barely 11/2 hours. Force-marching to Silesia he won perhaps his greatest victory exactly a month later, crushing the Austrian Army at Leuthen.

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757: Prussia's Eagle Resurgent . Napoleon referred to this campaign as a "masterpiece of manoeuvre and resolution". Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Rossbach and Leuthen 1757: Prussia's Eagle Resurgent - Osprey Campaign S. No. 113 (Paperback). Simon Millar (author), Adam Hook (illustrator).

Osprey's examination of Prussia's feats during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763). By the autumn of 1757 Frederick the Great was beset by enemies on all sides. The French had invaded the territory of his Anglo-Hanoverian allies, a Franco-Imperial army was threatening Saxony, an Austrian army 110,000-strong had marched into Silesia and even the ponderous Russians had moved against him. Then within a month Frederick transformed his fortunes. At Rossbach on 5 November he smashed the Franco-Imperial army in barely 11/2 hours. Force-marching to Silesia he won perhaps his greatest victory exactly a month later, crushing the Austrian Army at Leuthen. The Emperor Napoleon considered Frederick's lightning campaign 'a masterpiece of manoeuvre and resolution'.

Bolanim
Frederick the Great of Prussia was one of the outstanding military leaders of the 18th Century. His battlefield genius enabled Prussia to survive years of warfare against coalitions of opponents, while inspiring future generations of leaders in Europe. This Osprey Campaign Series book examines the critical battles of Rossbach and Leuthen in 1757, as Frederick consecutively faced French and Austrian-led armies in Central Europe.

The introduction includes a brief comparison of the opposing leaders and their armies. The heart of the narrative is the discussion of the battles of Rossbach in November 1757 and of Leuthen in December 1757. The author captures a sense of the dramatic tension as Frederick moves his outnumbered army from place to place, seeking favorable condition under which to give battle. The battle accounts highlight his superb sense of timing and terrain. The text is very nicely enhanced by period and modern illustrations, and especially by a series of maps and battle diagrams, which should allow the reader to follow the events as they unfolded.

This volume is the second of three Campaign Series books on Frederick's battles. It is a little light on the background and importance of Frederick and his campaigns. The general reader may wish to read the books in order to understand the context of the battles. Recommended.
Arar
Those who are looking for a good, quick analysis of these famous Second Silesian War battles of the can't go too far wrong here. The Osprey Campaign series are intended as quick reference works with nice maps and decent Oobs. They are ideal for wargamers and others looking for a nice summation of the battle. At roughly 95 pages each you can't expect an in-depth analysis of these actions. What you get is background information of the Campaign and rival commanders and armies followed by a fairly detailed description of the battle. These provide good color maps and illustrations of the events associated with the battle. Osprey also uses many contemporary prints and drawings as well.

Rossbach and Leuthen were two of Frederick's greatest victories. They epidemized his use of the famed Oblique Order method of attack. Leuthen shows this more clearly than Rossbach.

Rossback was a chaotic, encounter battle with Frederick catching the dysnfunctional Franco-Reichsarmee on the march. He proceeded to maul them in very short order. First with Moeller's expert use of artillery on Janus Hill which raked the enemy while in march column. Then the Prussian cavalry under the brilliant Sedlitz runs through the combined allied horse forcing them onto the ranks of their own infantry resulting in panic and mayhem. Finally the Prussian infantry advance over the Janus hill in perfect linear order with earshattering platoon and company vollies that cause havoc in Soubise's army. In less than a few hours the Prussian inflict over 10,000 allied losses with fewer than 500 of their own. It is one of Frederick's easist victories achieved with a minimum loss of Prussian life. Frederick could use more such cheaply bought victories!

At Leuthen there is potentially a more competent enemy. But the Hapsburg host is handicapped by having the inept Prince Charles of Lorraine placed in overall command instead of the more competent Leopold von Daun. Charles has a long list of defeats and this will perhaps be his greatest!

Frederick employs his classic Oblique Order of attack. He concentrates his smaller army against the flank of the stronger Austrian one. Fine marching and exact drill enable the Prussians who are familiar with the ground to march across the front of their enemy in order to slam into their flank. The terrain also allows for this as most of the Prussian maneuver is not visible to Charles and his staff. They also fall prey to Frederick's ruse of probing the Right while he leverages to strike their Left. Despite these advantages the Prussians will still have some stiff fighting as the Austrians even under bad leadership are still a formidable army. Still, it is an impressive victory with twice as many Austrian to Prussian casualties. The famous Anthem of Leuthen where the common Prussian soldiery give thanks To All Mighty God for their victory is one of many noteworthy events here. Frederick himself claimed that the honor of the House of Hohenzollern was vindicated with these two victories and he could die easier with that thought!

Both battles are covered pretty well in the Osprey format. Some might argue that each battle deserves its own booklet, and this would certainly add to the details of the narrative, but since Rossbach ends even before it gets started there is some logic in covering both battles in one volume. Nice maps and illustrations allow the reader to easily follow the action. The author also provides many actual photos of the battlefields today and how accessible they are for visiting. This to me is one of the great strengths of this series in that it provides that kind of infomation to the reader. In that respect these booklets can serve as a modern vistors guide as well. They also make for a good introduction to the general reader. Many pictures and maps can make the text seem less daunting to the reluctant modern day reader! Great introductory works and ideal for the Wargamer and historian alike.
Legend 33
I was hoping that Simon Millar's latest Osprey Campaign series title, Rossbach & Leuthen 1757, would be as good as his previous title, Kolin 1757. Alas, it is not. Whereas Kolin 1757 offered incisive military analysis of why Frederick the Great suffered his first defeat, Rossbach & Leuthen 1757 has much less to offer. Osprey Campaign titles are intended to be stand-alone volumes, but Millar has short-changed the readers of this volume in regards to background material, analysis and maps. The author's writing style is also far more plodding and passionless than in his previous volume; for example, Leuthen is presented as a bland recitation of units marching and firing, rather than a desperate winter battle (was there not a single eyewitness account that might have been incorporated?).
Rossbach & Leuthen 1757 begins with a short section on the origins of the campaign, a chronology and a section on opposing commanders. Unfortunately, there is no section on opposing plans as is normal in the Campaign series and the section on opposing armies is woefully inadequate. The author states that, "I am not going to discuss the uniforms, equipment or typical tactical formations of the combatants at Rossbach and Leuthen" since these subjects are detailed in various Osprey Men-at-Arms titles (11 other volumes to be exact). Instead, the author offers brief blurbs on the Prussian Guard, the Imperial Army, and Frederick's oblique order. Frankly, this was the first time that I ever felt cheated by an Osprey Campaign series title. The author partly redresses these omissions with two detailed order of battle tables for both battles. It is also highly questionable whether two battles separated by a month and 150 miles can be efficiently packed into the thin space of an Osprey title. Indeed, the campaign narrative appears to suffer from trying to cover too much; the author spends only 17 pages on the Rossbach campaign and 47 on Leuthen. The volume includes three 3-D "Birds Eye View" maps (one on Rossbach, two on Leuthen) and only four 2-D maps (Invasion of Hanover & Prussia, the road to Rossbach, the campaign in Silesia, the flank march at Leuthen). At least the three battle scenes included are good: the French and Prussian firing lines at Rossbach, the initial Prussian attack at Leuthen and Driesen's cavalry charge at Leuthen. The bibliography is also a bit disappointing since 50% of the sources listed are either Christopher Duffy's various titles (which are good but tend to recycle the same information) or Osprey Men-at-Arms titles.
The crux of both these battles comes down to Frederick's favorite tactic, the oblique attack. Unfortunately, the author fails to mention that this tactic required an excellent tactical picture of the enemy's disposition, convenient screening terrain and a fairly incompetent enemy commander; when Frederick held these advantages, the tactic worked. The author has little to say about the Battle of Rossbach. The French and Imperial forces were unprepared for mobile warfare and attempted a lethargic effort to flank Frederick's smaller army, but which blundered directly into the Prussian "kill sac." Millar blames the Austrian defeat at Leuthen primarily on faulty leadership, noting that, "once again the direction of the Austrian forces in the field would be decided by dynastic interests and pride, rather than ability." Certainly one major factor in the Austrian defeat was the premature commitment of virtually their entire reserve force to the wrong flank, in response to Prussian feints. Commitment of the reserves when the enemy's intentions are not yet clear is certainly an egregious error, but it doesn't suffice as the sole reason for the Austrian defeat. Other factors include the early defeat of the Austrian cavalry covering force, the low quality of the Imperial German troops that caught the brunt of the initial Prussian attack, the sluggish tactical response of the Austrian commanders and the collapse of Austrian morale. However, Napoleon's dictum that in war the morale is to the material as three is to one must surely have derived from his study of both these battles (Napoleon was much enamored of Leuthen), since Frederick was badly out-numbered in both battles but still won handily. Frederick's tactics were successful in both battles because he was able to disrupt his enemy's deployment (defensively at Rossbach and offensively at Leuthen) and this knocked his foes off-balance, but these same methods were much less effective against foes like the Russians who simply stood their ground even if flanked. One could say that Frederick's tactics were meant to take advantage of the faint-of-heart. Nor was Frederick particularly effective at exploiting his victories and pursuing a defeated enemy to destruction, since his style was geared toward highly centralized war making. The author also fails to mention that Rossbach and Leuthen, while victories, did not lead to any long-term advantages for encircled Prussia.
Modigas
An excellent addition to the series.