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by Gerald R. Anderson
Download Subic Bay From Magellan To Pinatubo: The History Of The U.S. Naval Station, Subic Bay fb2
Military
  • Author:
    Gerald R. Anderson
  • ISBN:
    1441444521
  • ISBN13:
    978-1441444523
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (January 12, 2009)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1579 kb
  • ePUB format
    1952 kb
  • DJVU format
    1995 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    103
  • Formats:
    doc lrf rtf mbr


Subic Bay, and more specifically the . Philippines soil in 1945, and the role that Subic Bay played in the ordeal of the 1600-plus .

Subic Bay, and more specifically the . Naval Station, looms large in historical lore and also to some degree through the screen. What sets this book apart from those that I've read about Subic Bay, is the way that the author has introduced snippets of information and key facts about its' history that I never knew before. service members who were aboard the Japanese POW ship Oryoko Maru, (where 80% of them perished under horrible conditions).

During the nearly 100-year history of the . Be the first to ask a question about Subic Bay from Magellan to Pinatubo. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Naval Station at Subic Bay, Philippines, thousands of American sailors and marines made port calls at this major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation base. Most loved it, some hated it, but all will remember it through this illustrated book.

Start by marking Subic Bay From Magellan To Pinatubo as Want to. .During the nearly 100-year history of the .

Start by marking Subic Bay From Magellan To Pinatubo as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this book Subic Bay is generally presented in a historical timeline format, with a few breakaway sections that deal with a specific subject matter area which provides the reader with a engrossing, rich glimpse into Subic Bay and its’ history through a period encompassing 400 years.

History Books Military History Books. Naval Station at Subic Bay, Philippines, thousands of American sailors and marines made port calls at this major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation base

History Books Military History Books. ISBN13: 9781441444523. Subic Bay from Magellan to Pinatubo : The History of the U. S. Naval Station, Subic Bay. by Gerald R. Anderson.

com Subic Bay History of the US Naval Station. September 27, 2017 ·.

Naval Base Subic Bay was a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the Spanish Navy and subsequently the United States Navy located in Zambales, Philippines. The Navy Exchange had the largest volume of sales of any exchange in the world, and the Naval Supply Depot handled the largest volume of fuel oil of any navy facility in the world.

Anderson, Gerald . Subic Bay from Magellan to Pinatubo: The History of the . Gerald Anderson; 2009. ISBN 978-1-4414-4452-3. Journal of the United States Artillery, Vol. 15, No. 2, Whole No. 48, pp. 129–146. United States, Office of Naval Intelligence (1892) Information from abroad. United States, Office of Naval Intelligence (1899) Information from abroad: War notes, Issues 1-8. United States.

The shutdown of the sprawling Subic Bay base, together with the closing of Clark Air Base after a volcanic eruption this year, amounts to the biggest reduction to date in the United States military presence in the western Pacific. to Look for New Sites.

Naval Air Station Cubi Point was a United States Navy aerial facility located at the edge of Naval Base Subic Bay and abutting the Bataan Peninsula in the Republic of the Philippines. During the Korean War, Admiral Arthur W. Radford, Chief of Naval Operations saw the need for a naval air station at Cubi Point. It was a rugged and jungle-covered finger of land 3 miles (. km) from Subic Naval Base. Navy in the Philippines.

Naval Air Station Cubi Point was a United States Navy aerial facility located at the edge of Naval Base Subic Bay and abutting the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines.

During the nearly 100-year history of the U.S. Naval Station at Subic Bay, Philippines, thousands of American sailors and marines made port calls at this major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation base.Most loved it, some hated it, but all will remember it through this illustrated book. Historical but very readable, this 3rd Edition includes "100 Years of PI Liberty" sure to bring back memories of this great liberty port. Puts a new perspective on Subic Bay as you get to know the fascinating background that is found nowhere else.

Blackstalker
Every Navy swabby who has served with the Seventh Fleet has spent many days and much money at Subic Bay and Olongapo, PI. This history book, while worthwhile reading and informative, is not what I would call a definitive book on the Liberty Port of Subic Bay. I enjoyed the information but very limited information on Subic is contained after the WWII era. Actually after the Japanese took over the base, very little information was written that already wasn't known. It would be interesting to have more up-to-date pictures of the base after WWII, but the ones that are shown are of poor quality. I would bet that many swabby's would be interested in the early history of Subic, so in that vein it is an informative book for them.
Malodor
This books provides the time-line that I was looking for for the establishment of the Naval Air Station, But the entire book is an easy read and has background information that makes an interesting history for Subic Bay. I would recommend this book to anyone that has an interest in Subic Bay.
Vetalol
Since I was stationed there in the 70's it was a good book to find out some of the history of the area.Also to see if any of the old landmarks were still around.
Yozshugore
Very interesting.
Kerahuginn
Hey Sailor Boy. Great book
Usishele
Terrible. Read like cut and paste from a command history submissions.
Unsoo
was interesting but repeated some parts and left a lot of "holes" for different time lines.
There is probably no greater symbol of the United States' global dominance and reach in the 20th century than Subic Bay in the Philippines. From its' inception as a Spanish Naval Base, to it' acquisition by the United States as part of the 1898 Treaty Of Paris, and through the turbulent years of the Philippine Insurrection, the second World War, the eventual return of sovereignty of the Philippines to the Filipino nation, and through the Korean, Vietnam wars and the conflict of Desert Storm.... Subic Bay, and more specifically the U.S. Naval Station, looms large in historical lore and also to some degree through the screen.

What sets this book apart from those that I've read about Subic Bay, is the way that the author has introduced snippets of information and key facts about its' history that I never knew before. He does a masterful job of paying attention to the years of Spanish influence on the bay, which actually covers well over 300 hundred years, and he is historically very accurate in explaining how the naval station eventually was retaken by local Filipino forces (with a heavy dose of U.S. support via the "Gunboat Diplomacy" of Admiral Dewey's Fleet). It would be impossible to ignore the defeat of the Spanish on 1 May 1898 at Manila Bay, and the author does a great job of inter-twining the naval battle with the strategic role that Subic Bay was viewed to play by both Spain and the United States - the Bay playing a key role in the tactical naval movements that played out prior to the battle.

On a personal level, as a former Subic Bay Marine, I found the recollections of life at Subic Bay, at the turn of the 19th century, fascinating prose. The author paints a word picture of life in the early 1900s in a way that you can almost see and feel the hardships and the pleasures of being a Marine infantryman serving in this location during that period in time. And in many instances, it becomes quite apparent through this book that, as in many things that are inherent to life in the Philippines, over the course of the 90 years of U.S. presence at the post, very little ever changed. The author tells of Marine training in 1905:
"No doubt the least popular among the Marines was a weekly drill in the swamp based on a scenario of a nighttime attack on the station. Marines were set up in attack and defense companies, ducking and dodging among the mangroves, waist or neck deep in liquid, foul-smelling mud"....the author could have just as easily been referring to 1990, when similar operations and training activities were a routine part of barrack's life.

Perhaps the most dramatic portions of this book are the recollection of events surrounding the battle at Zig-Zag Pass (just outside of the Naval Base, and on the road to Manila), which ranks right up there with other great battles of the Second World War, but through various circumstances is nothing more than a footnote in the many battles on Philippines soil in 1945, and the role that Subic Bay played in the ordeal of the 1600-plus U.S. service members who were aboard the Japanese POW ship Oryoko Maru, (where 80% of them perished under horrible conditions). The author does a fine job of detailing the post-war years and the ensuing growth of the U.S. presence and operations at Subic Bay, as well as the dramatic events that led to the eventual closure of the facility and its' return to Philippine authorities. Photos are used liberally throughout the book to augment portions of the text, and the book is sprinkled with anecdotes and recollections that provide the reader with a fascinating word-picture of the Bay and its' important place in history.

"Subic Bay" is generally presented in a historical timeline format, with a few breakaway sections that deal with a specific subject matter area. Outside of a few typographical or grammatical errors, nothing detracts from this book, which provides the reader with a engrossing, rich glimpse into Subic Bay and its' history through a period encompassing 400 years. I recommend this book as an historical reference source, as an addition to any military historian's collection or as a general reading text to accompany any undergraduate level course on Southeast Asian Studies. And, the book is a sure-fire hit with anyone who has ever served in any capacity as a member of the U.S. Armed Forces at Subic Bay.

LtCol P.G. Rynn, USMC (Ret.)