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by Colin S. Gray
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Military
  • Author:
    Colin S. Gray
  • ISBN:
    0304367346
  • ISBN13:
    978-0304367344
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Phoenix (May 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1507 kb
  • ePUB format
    1748 kb
  • DJVU format
    1511 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    371
  • Formats:
    azw doc mobi azw


Colin S. Gray has advised governments on both sides of the Atlantic about military affairs, and he looks into the future to provide some intriguing answers about the ways . has been added to your Cart.

Colin S. Gray has advised governments on both sides of the Atlantic about military affairs, and he looks into the future to provide some intriguing answers about the ways Western armed forces-which have traditionally been trained to fight conventional has been added to your Cart.

Another Bloody Century book. Published October 5th 2006 by Phoenix Press (CA)

Another Bloody Century book. Published October 5th 2006 by Phoenix Press (CA). Another Bloody Century: Future Warfare (Phoenix Press). 0304367346 (ISBN13: 9780304367344). He worked at the Colin S. Gray is a British-American strategic thinker and professor of International Relations and Strategic Studies at the University of Reading, where he is the director of the Centre for Strategic Studies. In addition, he is a Senior Associate to the National Institute for Public Policy. Gray has advised governments on both sides of the Atlantic about military affairs, and he looks into the future to provide some intriguing answers about. How the wars of the near future will be fought and who will win them Many nations, peoples and special interest groups believe that violence will advance their cause.

Warfare has changed greatly since the Second World War; it continued to change during the late 20th century and this process is still. Published by Phoenix (2007). Gray, Colin S. Published by Phoenix. Seller Inventory ria9780304367344 new.

Читать бесплатно книгу Another bloody century. Another bloody century : future warfare, Colin S. Gray. London : Phoenix, 2006. 431 p. : ill. ; p. of plates : phot. Future warfare (Gray C. и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку.

Another Bloody Century (Paperback). Authors: Gray, Colin S. Binding: Paperback. item 1 Another Bloody Century by Gray, Colin S. Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -Another Bloody Century by Gray, Colin S. Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. item 2 Another Bloody Century NEW Gray Colin S. -Another Bloody Century NEW Gray Colin S. £1. 1. item 3 Another Bloody Century by Gray, Colin S.

Another Bloody Century: Future Warfare (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2005). (2011). Harry S. Truman and the forming of American grand strategy in the Cold War, 1945–1953". Strategy and History:Essays on Theory and Practice (Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2006). War, Peace, and International Relations. In Murray, Williamson; Sinnreich, Richard Hart; Lacey, James (ed.

ANOTHER BLOODY CENTURY: Future Warfare. By Stephenson, Scott. ANOTHER BLOODY CENTURY: Future Warfare. From this starting premise, Another Bloody Century represents Gray's attempt to reconcile the enduring truths of organized violence with those features of war that are entirely new, such as the terrorist pursuit of weapons of mass destruction and the military exploitation of cyberspace. Though the author is respectful of history, he is not a historian. Gray identifies himself, instead, as a strategist.

Another Bloody Century. Future Warfare (Phoenix Press). Published May 1, 2007 by Phoenix Press.

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Colin S. Gray has advised governments on both sides of the Atlantic about military affairs, and he looks into the future to provide some intriguing answers about the ways Western armed forces—which have traditionally been trained to fight conventional, not guerrilla, warfare—may have to evolve.

Lcena
In fact, this book is a very different point of view regarding war in this Century. With great historic knowledge, the author give tips to be cautious before theorist that argue inter state war has not future. This book should be read by people interested in Foreign Affairs and top military leaders an Defence planers.
August
Well written and fascinating. I thoroughly enjoyed the book.
zmejka
A sound analysis presented with dry wit. Paints a somewhat dismal, if realistic view of warfare in the coming decades.
Beahelm
Mr. Gray does a masterful job of summarizing several possibilities for the future of warfare in this well written book. He bases his discussion on a theory of warfare that has proven timeless and accents his points with historical examples - reiterating that our future is inextricably linked to the past.
monotronik
Colin S. Gray has a realistic view of human nature and the future of warfare!
Malojurus
This book is well researched and the author does a great job at keeping the information well organized.
you secret
This book is strongly reflective of the author's philosophy of war, and seems based on the belief that war is always pretty much the same. His view of the future does not seem very insightful or modern. His understanding of cyber warfare emphasizes the espionage use of it almost exclusively, with little acknowledgement of the offensive use of it to misinform and manipulate beliefs or physical installations. Altogether the book was a disappointment, but there are very few good books on the subject, so there is not much competition, unfortunately.
This historical retrospective on war takes both the theoretical and the historical view of where the shape of war might go into the future. The author's theoretical discussions suggest, as an unacknowledged meta-theory, that the shape of war will not change -- due primarily to his seven factors which added up to the fact that human nature itself will not change.

In this underlying but unstated meta-theory, war acts as a roving independent variable. But as history, and as prose, it is easy to see that war is "spoken of" as if it were a dependent variable -- as a floating sui genres variable of uncertain and unclear pedigree and agency? However, I believe that this matter was settled by Clausewitz's most famous aphorism: "that war is but politics by other means." This establishes a clear causal link between war and politics, and thus an equally clear link to human nature as among its most important dependent variables.

Although the author did not do so here, I believe it is important to keep the linkages between the two as close as possible because, as much as we would like to think otherwise, war is not a free-floating variable without clear causes and direct linkages to politics and to power elites who manage those politics -- especially in those instances of disputes that eventually lead to war.

Whenever and wherever people may be associated with a cause whose disputes can lead to conflict, and conflict can then lead directly and inexorably to war, the chain of causation must be made explicit and cannot be broken. So war is woven tightly together with its antecedents, it's human causes. And the causes that inevitably lead to war are linked just as tightly to social and political conflicts, invariably managed by ruling elites whether they represent states or non-state actors.

Thus, at least from the theoretical point of view, the author's questions about whether or not war will change in the future must rest on a theory of whether or not human nature will itself change or remain unchanged in the future. And when this transposition is made, I believe we do have some new positive data that might indeed bear on the question of whether there will be changes in the nature of war in the future. And while admittedly it is difficult to speculate about what humans will do in the future and whether or nor we have evolved in a direction away from war, I believe there is strong anecdotal evidence that suggests that this is indeed the case.

The progress that has been made since the end of the feudal era has indeed been meager, but steady, incremental and detectable: The grip that ruling elites have over those who fight their wars has definitely loosened. This bodes well for more "democratic-like" societies in the future. And we know as an established fact that democratic societies on average go to war against each other much less frequently than those operating under more authoritarian systems.

Plus for better or worse, (and in this specific case it is for the better), the proliferation of nuclear weapons as had a chilling effect on the global community, so much so that it has resulted in a further ratcheting-down of, and a handicapping of ruling elites tendencies to want to use war as their first rather than their last resort option. So far only one nation has actually used nuclear. Weapons. Perhaps it is just coincidental that that same nation has fought more wars than any nation in the history of the world. Even so, I would argue that the development of nuclear weapons has made ruling elites less eager to use war to extend politics by other means.