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by Andrew MacKay,Stanley McChrystal,Steve Tatham
Download Behavioural Conflict: Why Understanding People and Their Motives Will Prove Decisive in Future Conflict fb2
Military
  • Author:
    Andrew MacKay,Stanley McChrystal,Steve Tatham
  • ISBN:
    1780394683
  • ISBN13:
    978-1780394688
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Military Studies Press (November 4, 2011)
  • Pages:
    220 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1475 kb
  • ePUB format
    1596 kb
  • DJVU format
    1761 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    611
  • Formats:
    txt doc mbr docx


Steve Tatham (Author), Andrew MacKay (Author), Stanley McChrystal (Foreword) & 0 more. The authors of this book made a major contribution to the study of the modern conflict

Steve Tatham (Author), Andrew MacKay (Author), Stanley McChrystal (Foreword) & 0 more. The authors of this book made a major contribution to the study of the modern conflict. In a very clear and effective manner they provide constructive criticism on our current efforts and practices to shape behavior in conflict zones, and provide sound recommendations to improve our ability to do so. The authors argue that this is a field of growing importance due to the information bubble that conflicts are increasingly waged in, and that increasingly war or conflict will be won or lost in the domain.

Behavioural Conflict makes a compelling argument that influence must be an integral component of future military .

Behavioural Conflict makes a compelling argument that influence must be an integral component of future military operations. In so doing, the book contributes significantly to our understanding of contemporary armed conflict" Recently included in Time Magazine 100 most influential people in the world. General Stanley McChrystal. Mackay and Tatham's work benefits from their personal experiences. Andrew Mackay and Steve Tatham have combined with Professor Jim Derleth to write a paper that challenges the status quo on how Corporate Social Responsibility should be conducted in Africa. Instability, Profitability and Behavioural Change. Influence Advisory Panel.

Behavioural Conflict book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Behavioural Conflict book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Behavioural Conflict: Why Understanding People and Their Motives Will Prove Decisive in Future Conflict as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

T1 - Behavioural conflict. T2 - Journal of policing, intelligence and counter terrorism.

Behavioural Conflict: Why Understanding People and Their Motives Will Prove Decisive in Future Conflict by Andrew Mackay and Steve Tatham ; foreword by Stanley McChrystal. Whilst geopolitics, economics, religion and ethnicity all play crucial roles in starting and sustaining conflict this book advances the idea that it will be people's behaviour, and the West's ability to understand, interpret and influence that behaviour which will become the defining characteristic of resolving future armed disputes.

This book argues that future conflicts will be best resolved by focusing attention on altering the behaviours of others, either in advance - and therefore deterring conflict - or as a coupled component in the process of combat and post-combat operations. They also argue that Western Armies have learnt too many lessons the hard way and been found wanting too easily. Behavioural Conflct argues for a fundamental rethink of the way that the West's militaries are organised, educated, trained and deployed.

The authors argue that future conflicts will be best resolved by focusing attention on altering the behaviors of others, either in advance - and therefore deterring conflict - or as a coupled component in the process of combat and post-combat operations. They also argue that Western Armies have learned too many lessons the hard way and been found wanting too easily.

Personal Name: Mackay, Andrew. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

He is also Executive Chairman of APPLIform.

He is also Executive Chairman of APPLIform References.

Tatham, along with McChrystal and Andrew Mackay, a. .is the author of a 2011 book, Behavioural Conflict, whose subtitle is: Why Understanding People and Their Motives Will Prove Decisive in Future Conflict.

Tatham, along with McChrystal and Andrew Mackay, a British general who served with McChrystal in Afghanistan, is the author of a 2011 book, Behavioural Conflict, whose subtitle is: Why Understanding People and Their Motives Will Prove Decisive in Future Conflict. It applies what Tatham learned during counterinsurgency wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, the Balkans, and Northern Ireland as lessons in how to get people do what you want them to do.

Whilst geopolitics, economics, religion and ethnicity all play crucial roles in starting and sustaining conflict this book advances the idea that it will be people’s behaviour, and the West’s ability to understand, interpret and influence that behaviour which will become the defining characteristic of resolving future armed disputes. This seminal study draws directly on the authors’operational experiences in Sierra Leone, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq, Lebanon and Afghanistan. Includes a chapter by behavioural scientist Dr. Lee Rowland and an introduction by the BBC Radio 4 “More or Less” presenter Tim Harford. The foreword is by former ISAF commander General (ret.) Stanley McChrystal. This book argues that future conflicts will be best resolved by focusing attention on altering the behaviours of others, either in advance – and therefore deterring conflict – or as a coupled component in the process of combat and post-combat operations. They also argue that Western Armies have learnt too many lessons the hard way and been found wanting too easily. "Behavioural Conflct" argues for a fundamental rethink of the way that the West’s militaries are organised, educated, trained and deployed.

Umge
Good read, but ultimately disappointing. This is kind of a thought piece posing as a prescriptive thesis. In the end, the authors come across as begging for a solution to a problem that they clearly state, describe, clarify, and restate many times throughout the book. That process of repeatedly elucidating the problem, though, is done in a manner that clearly illustrates command-level problems with planning and operations. The weakness of the book is the primary authors' (who are both senior officers) failure to clearly place responsibility for failure where it belongs, at the feet of planners and strategists. This is particularly true for the failings of Iraq '03, where excuses are made rather than failings clearly identified.

On the other hand, the authors' repeated description of the problem and exploration of potential approaches to a solution makes for an interesting read. Particularly, for this American, the detailed review of the operational approaches the UK MoD has taken to the problem. I was familiar with some of it, but I enjoyed the direct perspective the authors provided.
The penultimate chapter purported to describe a solution. But, jarringly to me, it was written by a psychologist describing a "scientific approach" that sounded surprisingly like disciplined intelligence analysis focused on socio-cultural intelligence for influence. Of course he doesn't use those terms and puts forth his solution in disjointed fashion, full of scientific buzz phrases. Back to jarringly, this really seemed odd coming from a guy who was a former Royal Marine Commando and should have a fundamental understanding of intelligence and the ability to write in clearer terms.

The sub-title for this book is "Why understanding people and their motivations will prove decisive in future conflict." The authors do a good job of clarifying that "why", despite the focus being on past (particularly Afghanistan and Iraq) and the future not being discussed much beyond its likelihood of being a reflection of the recent past. My disappointment with the book is in the lack of a substantive "how." In the end, it comes off as both apologetic, for the failure to effectively support the troops on the ground, and begging for funding and organizational answers to the problem.
Felolak
The authors of this book made a major contribution to the study of the modern conflict. In a very clear and effective manner they provide constructive criticism on our current efforts and practices to shape behavior in conflict zones, and provide sound recommendations to improve our ability to do so. The authors argue that this is a field of growing importance due to the information bubble that conflicts are increasingly waged in, and that increasingly war or conflict will be won or lost in the information/behavior domain. Due to projected budget cuts in defense spending in the UK (and also the U.S.), they make sound sound arguments on the economic efficiency of improving our ability operate in the information/behavior domain to both prevent conflict and to hopefully bring ongoing conflicts to a close. I wish it was mandatory reading for all U.S. policy makers and senior military members who are responsible for developing our strategies and determining future force capabilities. I am confident it would also benefit law enforcement professionals.
Knights from Bernin
This is a very good read. It looks in an analytical way at what is the message being delivered, by whom and for what ends. Understanding the people as the "centre of gravity" was always essential in "winning hearts and minds" but as one General once said "I will tell you what to think" is not how Operational Art should be practiced.Many applications across the spectrum of military planning, Info Ops, Cimic,Conops etc.
Feri
This is a terrific book. Well written. Clearly stated. Prime with colorful, relevant examples that show how and why the key to winning conflicts in an era of modern global communication lies in shaping attitudes and opinions and motivating people rather than through the use of bullets. The great thing about this book is how the authors draw upon their personal experiences and expertise as professional soldiers to illustrate that traditional military action -- what the military terms "kinetic operations" -- has to be utilized, and may often play a secondary role, to effective strategic communication. I especially admired the incisive analysis of the role that media played in the Bosnia conflict. The examples drawn from Northern Ireland, Iraq, and Sierre Leone are equally compelling. The thesis of the authors is that affecting behavior through strategic communication needs to be brought to the forefront of strategic thinking is on target. My own background has combined work in political communication and information strategy in dealing with counter terrorism, sovereignty, and political issues that affect national security. I learned a lot from this book. It's entertaining but always informative. The authors are in command of their brief.

This book is an absolute must read for anyone who wants to understand how shaping behavior is a key to prevailing in modern conflict.