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by Marilyn Henry
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Military
  • Author:
    Marilyn Henry
  • ISBN:
    0853036292
  • ISBN13:
    978-0853036296
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vallentine Mitchell (January 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1362 kb
  • ePUB format
    1297 kb
  • DJVU format
    1110 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    300
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf doc docx


Marilyn Henry has written a clear and concise overview with sensitivity to so many conflicting issues over too many years.

Marilyn Henry has written a clear and concise overview with sensitivity to so many conflicting issues over too many years. It is amazing to think that, in 1952, Jewish leaders realized the need to sit at a negotiating table, across from representatives of a country that was successful at destroying the fabric of Jewish life throughout the world.

Confronting the Perpetrators book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Confronting the Perpetrators: A History of the Claims Conference as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Confronting the Perpetrators: A History of the Claims Conference as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In the US, broad interest in the Holocaust was sparked by two cultural phenomena: the 1993 opening of the US Holocaust . The consortium became the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (known as the Claims Conference).

In the US, broad interest in the Holocaust was sparked by two cultural phenomena: the 1993 opening of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and the film Schindler's List. The collapse of communism, the opening of archives in eastern Europe, and the approach of the millenniumâ?and with it a desire to 'clean the slate'â?also sparked a series of confrontations with the past. Among those confrontations was an extraordinary focus on the material losses and injuries suffered by Nazi victims.

A History of the Claims Conference. At the end of the twentieth century, the world seemed to rediscover Holocaust survivors. In the US, broad interest in the Holocaust was sparked by two cultural phenomena: the 1993 opening of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and the film Schindler's List.

oceedings{TP, title {Confronting the Perpetrators: A History of the Claims Conference}, author {Marilyn Henry and Martin N. Gilbert}, year {2007} }. Marilyn Henry, Martin N. Gilbert.

Confronting the Perpetrators. A History of the Claims Conference. Published January 2007 by Vallentine Mitchell.

Marilyn Henry (March 5, 1953 – March 1, 2011) was an American author, columnist, journalist, historian and archivist for matters .

Marilyn Henry (March 5, 1953 – March 1, 2011) was an American author, columnist, journalist, historian and archivist for matters pertaining to Holocaust reparations, survivor benefits and art looted by the Nazis. 1 Life and career References. a b Friedman, Jeanette; Berenbaum, Michael (March 9, 2011). Marilyn Henry, Advocate for Survivors".

Confronting the Perpetrators: A History of the Claims Conference. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780853036296 (978-0-85303-629-6) Softcover, Vallentine Mitchell, 2007.

Confronting the perpetrators : Jewish material claims for Nazi atrocities Establishing the legal right to compensation : West German indemnification and restitution legislation From legal right to humanitarian aid : the Claims Conference Hardship Fund From East Berlin to Bonn : recovering Jewish assets from the German Democratic Republic "Would Anne Frank have been eligible?" : post-unification compensation The legacy of the dead : recovering heirless Jewish properties.

Henry focused much of the latter part of her journalism career in advocacy for survivors of the Nazi Holocaust, but .

Henry focused much of the latter part of her journalism career in advocacy for survivors of the Nazi Holocaust, but kept a neutral stance in her coverage of the myriad thorny issues involved.

At the end of the twentieth century, the world seemed to rediscover Holocaust survivors. Ceremonies commemorating the 50th anniversary of World War II-era events offered occasions for reflection about the war, its heroes, and its victims. In the US, broad interest in the Holocaust was sparked by two cultural phenomena: the 1993 opening of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and the film Schindler's List. The collapse of communism, the opening of archives in eastern Europe, and the approach of the millennium-and with it a desire to 'clean the slate'-also sparked a series of confrontations with the past. Among those confrontations was an extraordinary focus on the material losses and injuries suffered by Nazi victims. Class-action lawsuits filed in American courts against European governments and enterprises, improvised commissions, national historical reviews, and international conferences attempted, at century's end, to deal with the material, historical, legal, and moral issues stemming from the Holocaust. These initiatives built on groundwork laid in 1951, when Israel and an ad hoc consortium of voluntary Jewish organizations received an invitation to negotiate with West Germany for 'moral and material amends' for Nazi-era damages. The consortium became the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (known as the Claims Conference).