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by Gilberto N Villahermosa,Center of Military History
Download Honor and Fidelity: The 65th Infantry in Korea, 1950–1953 fb2
Military
  • Author:
    Gilberto N Villahermosa,Center of Military History
  • ISBN:
    1460956303
  • ISBN13:
    978-1460956304
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 2, 2009)
  • Pages:
    348 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1530 kb
  • ePUB format
    1284 kb
  • DJVU format
    1313 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    185
  • Formats:
    docx doc lrf mobi


Discusses the experiences of the 65th Infantry, a Puerto Rican infantry . The best book published regarding The 65th Infantry that I have read so far! I purchased two more for gifts.

Discusses the experiences of the 65th Infantry, a Puerto Rican infantry unit, during the Korean War. 348 pages. by Gilberto N. Villahermosa (Author), Center of Military History (Author), Jeffrey J. Clarke (Foreword) & 0 more.

Honor and Fidelity book. The Army reconstituted the 65th as a fully integrated infantry regiment in the spring of 1953. By that June, the regiment had redeemed itself in the eyes of the Army’s senior leadership. Discusses the experiences of the 65th Infantry, a Puerto. The unit’s colors remained in Korea until November 1954, when they returned to Puerto Rico.

The Borinqueneers in Korea. Honor and Fidelity joins an ever-growing list of regimental histories covering twentieth-century American military history

The Borinqueneers in Korea. Honor and Fidelity joins an ever-growing list of regimental histories covering twentieth-century American military history. What sets it apart from many recent offerings is its role in expanding our understanding of organizational evolution during long-term commitment to combat operations. Author Gilbert N. Villahermosa, a serving army officer, has done a masterful job detailing the experiences of a unique outfit in the post-World War II . The 65th Infantry was a typical Regular Army unit in 1950, in that it lacked a significant percentage of authorized personnel, equipment of all types, and adequate training areas.

Army’s combat forces during one of the most trying periods in its history

Army’s combat forces during one of the most trying periods in its history. Its findings underscore the critical impact of personnel-rotation policies, ethnic and organizational prejudices, and the work of small-unit leaders on combat readiness and battlefield success. They also illustrate the critical role of senior leaders in analyzing problems in these areas in a timely fashion and instituting effective reforms.

The Army reconstituted the 65th as a fully integrated infantry regiment in the spring of 1953 . By that June, the regiment had redeemed itself in the eyes of the Armys senior leadership. The units colors remained in Korea until November 1954, when they returned to Puerto Rico. Издательство: Center of Military History United States Army. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Royal Air Force And Army Air Corps.

We calculated two types of cost efficiency indexes by inclusion or exclusion of pharmacy cost for a medical clinic. The agreement between the decile rankings of the two indexes was also assessed using the weighted kappa statistic of Landis and Koch.

Release Date:July 2010. Publisher:Military Studies Press. 08 lbs. Dimensions:0.

book by Gilberto N. Villahermosa. Discusses the experiences of the 65th Infantry, a Puerto Rican infantry unit, during the Korean War. Release Date:July 2010. Age Range:16 years and up. Grade Range:Grade 11 and higher.

by Gilberto N. Center of Military History. xiv whose service as a young infantryman in the 65th Infantry during the Korean War inspired me to begin this project, also assisted in ways too numerous to mention

by Gilberto N. United States Army Washington, . Villahermosa, Gilberto . 1958–. xiv whose service as a young infantryman in the 65th Infantry during the Korean War inspired me to begin this project, also assisted in ways too numerous to mention. It remains only to note that the conclusions and interpretations expressed in this book are mine alone and that I am solely responsible for any errors. The views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the offi- cial policy or position of the Departments of the Army and Defense or the .

Despite a lack of previous wartime experience, the regiment did extremely well from September 1950 to August 1951, establishing a solid reputation as a dependable infantry unit. The combat performance of the unit began to slip from the summer of 1951 to the autumn of 1952, when major failures occurred, first at Outpost Kelly in late September and then at Jackson Heights a month later.

Originally formed at the turn of the nineteenth century to protect America’s strategic interests in the Caribbean, the 65th Infantry was composed of locally recruited Puerto Rican soldiers led primarily by non-Hispanic “continental” officers. Although in existence for almost fifty years, the 65th had not experienced intense combat until it was committed to the Korean peninsula in the initial months of the war. There, despite its lack of previous wartime service, the regiment did extremely well from September 1950 to August 1951, establishing a solid reputation as a dependable infantry unit and a mainstay of the heavily embattled 3d Infantry Division. After that period, however, its performance began to suffer as experienced cadre rotated out of the regiment and were replaced by new leaders and soldiers who lacked the skills and special cohesive bonds displayed by their predecessors. The net result was a highly publicized series of incidents and disciplinary actions that have never been adequately explained or understood. This study reviews the performance of the 65th Infantry throughout the war, providing insights not only into the regiment’s unique problems but also into the status of the U.S. Army’s combat forces during one of the most trying periods in its history. Its findings underscore the critical impact of personnel-rotation policies, ethnic and organizational prejudices, and the work of small-unit leaders on combat readiness and battlefield success. They also illustrate the critical role of senior leaders in analyzing problems in these areas in a timely fashion and instituting effective reforms. For the 65th, a catastrophic shortage of trained NCOs, unaddressed language problems, and inept command leadership temporarily undermined its combat effectiveness. Making matters worse, senior commanders reacted in a heavy-handed manner with little analysis of what was really going on. In the end, it was the martial traditions of the 65th’s Hispanic soldiers and a host of new leaders willing to address its special problems that pulled the unit through. The regiment’s colors remained in Korea until November 1954, when the unit returned to Puerto Rico. Today, the 1st Battalion of the 65th Infantry remains as part of the Puerto Rican National Guard, a testimony to a unique combat unit that served the United States Army well for over one hundred years. Yet, what has sometimes been called the Forgotten War is still rich in lessons that the Army of today can ill afford to forget if it is to succeed on the battlefields of tomorrow.

Whilingudw
No 1
lacki
Growing up it was the talk of the town...the 65th infantry of Puerto Rico and it's roll in the Korean war, now we get a modern version of the complexity of managing these group of heroes.
Quellik
Excellent condition
Beabandis
Great book!
Asyasya
Glad to see it. Glad to see" Omission" is no longer the standard.
Gtonydne
I don't like the footnotes in the middle of the text. They interrupt the reading flow. Don't like it too much.
Kage
The best book published regarding The 65th Infantry that I have read so far! I purchased two more for gifts.
Not being familiar with military protocol made it difficult to understand many of the significances of the material provided. No personal reactions or descriptions of battles.