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by Theodore Rockwell
Download The Rickover Effect: The Inside Story of How Adm. Hyman Rickover Built the Nuclear Navy fb2
Military
  • Author:
    Theodore Rockwell
  • ISBN:
    0471122963
  • ISBN13:
    978-0471122968
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wiley; 1 edition (August 25, 1995)
  • Pages:
    411 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1471 kb
  • ePUB format
    1558 kb
  • DJVU format
    1690 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    306
  • Formats:
    txt docx mbr lrf


The Rickover Effect is a riveting tale of genius and dedication told in intimate, human terms. He served as technical director of the .

The Rickover Effect is a riveting tale of genius and dedication told in intimate, human terms. Naval Reactors Program from 1954 to 1964.

The Rickover Effect: The Inside Story of How Adm. Hyman Rickover Built the Nuclear Navy. This book was endorsed by Admiral Rickover as it was written by Theodore Rockwell, one of the original Naval Reactors staffers. Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage. In fact, Ted had a book signing at one of our Naval Reactors reunions several years ago. I bought his book and he signed it for me. The book is factual and easy to read as it is anecdotal (Ted Rockwell tells many stories so it is fun to read). I have been involved with Nuclear Power for 37 years now.

The Rickover Effect book. Story of Admiral Hyman G. Rickover's development of the US Navy's nuclear fleet & his transformation of how industry operates, the "Rickover Effect".

The Public Rickover Getting Ready (1939-1947) Building a Decisive Weapon (1947-1952) Putting the Atom to Work (1950-1957) Upgrading the Quality of . Industry (1955-1960) Proclaiming the Need for Excellence (1959-1964) Extending the Rickover Effect (1964-1986) Epilogue Index.

The consummate inside story of Rickover's team: how they developed nuclear power, how they worked together .

The consummate inside story of Rickover's team: how they developed nuclear power, how they worked together, and their relationships with a revered, though controversial, boss. -Captain Edward L. Beach, USN (Re., author of Run Silent, Run Deep. In less than a decade, Hyman G. Rickover created the world's first nuclear submarine, the USS Nautilus, and built the world's first atomic power station.

Hyman Rickover Built the Nuclear Navy (미국 원자력 해군의 아버지 리코버 제독) Author/Translator: Theodore Rockwell, Choi Il, Kim Moon-Soo Publishing Company : KIMS Public Year: 27 September 2012 Price: ₩ 25,000. KIMS 韓國海洋戰略硏究所 KOREA INSTITUTE FOR MARITIME STRATEGY.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. the inside story of how Adm. July 30, 2010 History. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Rickover effect from your list? The Rickover effect. by Theodore Rockwell. Published 1995 by J. Wiley in New York.

Rockwell, Theodore, The Rickover effect: the inside story of how Adm. Rickovertrained officers and enlisted men were soon in high demand by America's nuclear power industry. Hyman Rickover built the nuclear Navy, New York: J. Wiley, 1995. Encyclopedia of World Biography.

Admiral Hyman Rickover (1900-1986), the Father of the Nuclear Navy, was one .

Admiral Hyman Rickover (1900-1986), the Father of the Nuclear Navy, was one of the most successful-and controversial- public managers of the 20th Century. His accomplishments are the stuff of legend. For example, in three short years, Rickover’s team designed and built the first nuclear submarine-the Nautilus-an amazing feat of engineering given that it involved the development of the first use of a controlled nuclear reactor. The text below is an excerpt from a speech Rickover delivered at Columbia University in 1982, in which he succinctly outlined his management philosophy.

"A notable, anecdote-rich biography of the controversial 'father of the nuclear navy.'"—Publishers Weekly

"This thought-provoking, well-written, and stimulating book . . . is an honest tribute to a man whose greatness will one day be recognized even more than it is today."—Associated Press

"Together with Rhodes's definitive account of the race . . . to develop a nuclear bomb, these two works constitute the most important contributions to date on the history of atomic energy."—Nuclear News

"The consummate inside story of Rickover's team: how they developed nuclear power, how they worked together, and their relationships with a revered, though controversial, boss."—Captain Edward L. Beach, USN (Ret.), author of Run Silent, Run Deep

In less than a decade, Hyman G. Rickover created the world's first nuclear submarine, the USS Nautilus, and built the world's first atomic power station. His unprecedented technological achievements overcame both natural and human obstacles and gave new meaning to the concept of industrial quality control.

Here is the critically acclaimed, authentic inside story, told by the man who worked at Rickover's side for fifteen years. Theodore Rockwell takes us behind the "zirconium curtain" to see the emergence of the commercial nuclear industry through the eyes of those who shaped it and to discover why Rickover provoked a storm of controversy. The Rickover Effect is a riveting tale of genius and dedication told in intimate, human terms.

Theodore Rockwell is an editor and author, as well as an expert on nuclear reactors who worked with Admiral Rickover from 1949 to 1964. He served as technical director of the U.S. Naval Reactors Program from 1954 to 1964.


Ces
I was in the nuclear navy for about 8 years. Rickover was a legend and the stories often depicted him as a slightly mad admiral. However, this book sheds light on one of the most important american industrymen and engineer. It's a first person account of Rickover's methods and management style. Today's business leaders would do well to take a few notes on how Rickover handled everything from quarrels with unions to building entire supply chains. This is an excellent read.
Kirimath
For those interested in Nuclear Power, Leadership and people who know how to get things done, they will love this book. Rickover is known to most as the father of the Nuclear Powered Submarine, but he was much more and a man who's experiences and actions continue to teach future generations. A must read for any leader in any industry.
Monam
A very informative account of Admiral Hyman persistent efforts (beginning while he held the rank of Captain) to utilize nuclear engines as prime movers of submarines. History has richly vindicated his efforts, in that aircraft carriers and other capital navy ships also are now nuclear power driven.
Mautaxe
Excellent book
Iriar
Many biographies have been written about Hyman Rickover, the father of the Nuclear Navy, which focus on his dictatorial idiosyncrasies and leave the reader wondering how anyone could have ever worked for him. In "The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made A Difference" author Ted Rockwell discusses how Rickover's leadership style created a paradigm shift among all of the organizations he came in contact with focusing away from the status quo and toward operational excellence and high-reliability. Rockwell, who worked for Rickover from 1949 to 1964 and served as the Technical Director of the U.S. Naval Reactors Program (NR) between 1954 and 1964 is certainly in one of the best positions to discuss his perceptions of Rickover's personality, work ethic, and style.
One of the quotes from the book that impressed me very much was that Rickover questioned how people who admitted they could never have accomplished what he had done -- building the first atomic submarine from abstract concept to reality in record time - could question his leadership and management style. Critics generally focus on Rickover's demanding style as ruthless and insensitive, when in reality he was building a committed organization and shaking out those that were not as dedicated as he was. It is quite obvious that Rickover would never had asked anyone to do anything he was not willing to do.
Rockwell's story encompasses his recruitment out of the post Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge until Rickover's death. While Rockwell left the Naval Reactors program 1964, he continues to write about how Rickover's influence shaped his management and technological paradigm and allowed he and two of his co-workers at NR to open an engineering firm delivering outside of the Navy the same operational excellence and high-reliability systems they had developed in NR. Rockwell also discusses how leaving Rickover's program changed their relationship.
Rockwell's book is a pleasant read, as his story is not overly technical and draws readers into an appreciation of how the Naval Reactors program influenced work systems and quality management. This book should be of interest not just to those interested in the life of Hyman Rickover and the Nuclear Navy, but persons studying leadership and culture management, technological advancement, and the career of Ted Rockwell - one of the unsung heroes of nuclear technology. I also encourage readers to check out Rockwell's new book, "Creating the New World: Stories and Images From the Dawn of the Atomic Age."
Wrathmaster
"The Rickover Effect" is a fascinating depiction of Admiral Hyman Rickover's efforts to build the nuclear Navy. This book is not intended to serve as a comprehensive chronicle of Rickover's career and private life, but as a chronicle of Rickover's accomplishments in bringing nuclear power to the Navy as viewed by a subordinate. Within these self-admitted limitations, the book succeeds, but Theodore Rockwell also attempts to turn Rickover's leadership style into some sort of management primer.
Rockwell examines various anecdotes and discusses the effectiveness of Rickover's management acumen in dealing with both political and technical problems. This attempt to explain "The Rickover Effect" is rather clumsy and unnecessary. The reader can judge for him or herself the success of Rickover's abilities.
Readers unfamiliar with Rickover's personality must keep in mind that this account is written by someone who obviously admired and respected Rickover a great deal. Rockwell's close association with Rickover has caused him to see the Admiral through biased eyes. Rockwell sees Rickover as firm but fair, which isn't entirely accurate. Although truly a visionary, Rickover was extremely difficult for most military personnel to get along with and prone to frightening fits of rage. Although he was often the target of attacks on his character, Rickover often treated his political enemies and detractors cruelly, and at times led his own vicious attacks. Rockwell appears sincere in his treatment of Rickover, but it is obvious he doesn't see the Admiral as an outsider would.
With these limitations in mind, this is actually a very entertaining account of how the nuclear Navy started.