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by Stephen Peter Rosen
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Military
  • Author:
    Stephen Peter Rosen
  • ISBN:
    0801425565
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801425561
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cornell University Press (December 3, 1991)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
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    1272 kb
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    1506 kb
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    4.8
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Rosen recounts how major innovations in the twentieth century changed the way wars were fought. He is the author of Societies and Military Power: India and Its Armies and Winning the Next War: Innovation and the Modern Military from Cornell.

Rosen recounts how major innovations in the twentieth century changed the way wars were fought. Rosen crafts his book with a historian's eye for the facts and a political scientist’s willingness to draw conclusions. Series: Cornell Studies in Security Affairs.

Winning the Next War Innovation and the Modern Military Cornell Studies in Security Affairs.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Cornell Studies in Security Affairs: Winning the . Author: Rosen, Stephen Peter ISBN 10: 0801481961. Title: Winning the Next War Item Condition: New. Will be clean, not soiled or stained.

Author: Rosen, Stephen Peter ISBN 10: 0801481961. Books will be free of page markings.

Stephen Peter Rosen is a Harvard College Professor and Beton Michael Kaneb Professor of National Security and Military Affairs at Harvard University. In addition to his academic work, Rosen was also Master of Harvard College's Winthrop House from 2003 to 2009. Stephen Rosen was born in NYC and grew up on Long Island. He received his . in Political Science from Harvard College, and his P. in Government from Harvard University.

In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to "fight the . He also discusses the changing relationship between the civilian innovator and the military bureaucrat.

In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to "fight the last wa. Rather, they are able to respond to shifts in the international strategic situation.

In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to. . In peacetime, Rosen finds, innovation has been the product of analysis and the politics of military promotion, in a process that has slowly but successfully built military capabilities critical to American military success. In wartime, by contrast, innovation has been constrained by the fog of war and the urgency of combat needs.

Winning the Next War book . In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to "fight the last wa.

Military innovation has been thus far defined in terms of major changes in the behavior of military organizations, changes in how they fight or organize for war.

Series: Cornell Studies in Security Affairs. The modern American military is quite noticeably different from the military that emerged from World War I. Innovations must have taken place at some point. Military innovation has been thus far defined in terms of major changes in the behavior of military organizations, changes in how they fight or organize for war. This definition has deliberately excluded the question of technological innovation, the process by which new weapons and military systems are created, except insofar as new technologies can be identified as the source of organizational change.

Stephen Peter Rosen, Robert J. Art, Robert L. Jervis. How and when do military innovations take place? Do they proceed differently during times of peace and times of war?

Stephen Peter Rosen, Robert J. How and when do military innovations take place? Do they proceed differently during times of peace and times of war? In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to "fight the last wa.

How and when do military innovations take place? Do they proceed differently during times of peace and times of war? In Winning the Next War, Stephen Peter Rosen argues that armies and navies are not forever doomed to "fight the last war." Rather, they are able to respond to shifts in the international strategic situation. He also discusses the changing relationship between the civilian innovator and the military bureaucrat.

In peacetime, Rosen finds, innovation has been the product of analysis and the politics of military promotion, in a process that has slowly but successfully built military capabilities critical to American military success. In wartime, by contrast, innovation has been constrained by the fog of war and the urgency of combat needs. Rosen draws his principal evidence from U.S. military policy between 1905 and 1960, though he also discusses the British army's experience with the battle tank during World War I.