» » Churchill's Generals

Download Churchill's Generals fb2

by JOHN (editor) KEEGAN
Download Churchill's Generals fb2
Military
  • Author:
    JOHN (editor) KEEGAN
  • ISBN:
    0349113173
  • ISBN13:
    978-0349113173
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Warner Books; New Ed edition (1992)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Military
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1898 kb
  • ePUB format
    1211 kb
  • DJVU format
    1505 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    792
  • Formats:
    mobi lit lrf docx


John Keegan has assembled a cast of seventeen generals whose reputations were made (and . Churchill's reputation as prime minister during the Second World War fluctuated according to the successes and failures of his generals.

John Keegan has assembled a cast of seventeen generals whose reputations were made (and some of them broken) by Churchill and the Second World Wa. hurchill's reputation as prime minister during the Second World War fluctuated according to the successes and failures of his generals. Most of them were household names, and often heroes, during the war years.

Churchill's Generals book. The twenty mini-bios are written by seventeen different military biographers. The generals covered are Ironside, Gort, Dill, Wavell, Alanbrooke, Alexander, Auchinleck, Montgomery, Wilson, O'Connor, Cunningham, Ritchie, Leese, Horrocks, Hobart, Percival, Wingate, Slim, De Wiart, and Spears.

ISBN 10: 0349113173 ISBN 13: 9780349113173. Publisher: Warner Books, 1992. Churchill’s reputation as Prime Minister during World War II fluctuated according to the successes and failures of his generals.

Churchill's generals. Churchill's generals. by. Keegan, John, 1934-. World War, 1939-1945, Generals. New York : G. Weidenfeld.

Also by John Keegan Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of. .This is a borzoi book Knopf, Borzoi Books, and the colophon are registered trademarks o.

Also by John Keegan Intelligence in War The First World War The Face of Battle The Nature of War (with Joseph Darracott) World Armies Who’s Who in Military History. This is a borzoi book. Published by alfred a. knopf. Published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, In. New York. Knopf, Borzoi Books, and the colophon are registered trademarks of Random House, Inc. Maps by Reginald Piggott. Published 1992 by Abacus. Generals, World War, 1939-1945, Biography. There's no description for this book yet. An authoritative look at the men who helped Churchill win World War II-a companion volume to Hitler's Generals

Churchill's Generals. An authoritative look at the men who helped Churchill win World War II-a companion volume to Hitler's Generals. Beginning with an essay that examines Churchill's rise and strategic cast of thought, the book goes on to provide an intimate portait of each general. Black-and-white photographs.

item 7 Churchill's Generals by Keegan, John Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -Churchill's Generals by.

item 7 Churchill's Generals by Keegan, John Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -Churchill's Generals by Keegan, John Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. He is also the author of several books on the Second World War. Country of Publication.

A unique collection of essays by eminent historians—and edited by one of the world’s most acclaimed military writers: John Keegan. Churchill’s reputation as Prime Minister during World War II fluctuated according to the successes and failures of his generals. Most were household names—even heroes. Yet all were prey to the intolerance, interference, irascibility, and inspiration of Britain’s leader, who wanted to be both the general in the field and the presiding strategic genius. Yet, despite sacking his warlords ruthlessly, in the end Churchill was served by perhaps the greatest generals England has ever produced. The chapters cover such outstanding military men as Wavell, Ironside, Ritchie, Auchinleck, Montgomery, Alexander, Percival, Wingate, and Carton de Wiart.

Taur
Not finished with the book as yet, but so far I'd give it 5 stars.
Kupidon
One reads Keegan for his insight and wonderfully expressive writing style...
Talvinl
A decent read
Fegelv
I guess it is a good book. It deals mainly with their relationship with old winston. (just like the title stated) But I was hoping for a lil more info on their early lifes.

But it is still a good book, as a intro to WW2 British Generals.
Gavirgas
Ok; but missing the John Keegan touch.
Kulalbine
Basic, very basic, essays on 20 of Churchill's Generals from World War Two. Some of the generals don't even get their own essays, as there is only 17 chapters. And when I say basic, what we get is a bio of their life, explaining their family background, education, and military life before the events of World War Two. Many served in the Great War and this would color, greatly, their command style. As many other reviews have pointed out, there is NOT a lot of details in these chapters. Luckily, each chapter DOES end with Notes, which list by their very nature other books you can find to learn more about the generals, and chronology of the general or generals.
For a book that is 360 pages something long, it does a good job. I can't compare it to the other books, as I never read them, so I can only base my star rating on the book only. In the end I would suggest it for people JUST getting into World War Two who want to know more about the British High Command and maybe get a picture of British hopes and dreams for their forces in the Middle East, Far East, and in Europe. But if you want more details I suggest looking up the sources quoted in the notes. Or just doing a search on amazon and finding a book on them. I wanted to know more about Field-Marshal Lord Slim AND Lieutenant-General Arthur Percival.
Like I said, for a beginner just starting with World War Two history this may be one of the books to start with. Otherwise I think of it as a hit or miss. And I doubt I will be rereading it.
Water
This book is an interesting and exceptionally well-done introduction to the British perspective of World War II. Each of the seventeen chapter is a biography of a key British general during this conflict. Some are well-known (Montgomery), while others have largely been forgotten (Sir Henry Wilson). Five generals end up having to share two chapters. Each and every one, though, gets a good biography. There are differences in focus, emphasis, and interpretation, which is to be expected, but none of these entries is weak. This fact in and of itself makes this book unique among in its genre.

The authors come from a number of backgrounds: academia, journalism, and the military, including a general and a field marshal. One of the contributors is Australian, another is American and the rest are British. The reader is getting a good cross sampling of the British perspective.

The main theme that emerges from these essays is the importance of interpersonal relationships with both Churchill but also other generals. The chapters also do a good job of introducing the reader to issues in the literature without getting bogged down in the details. Each chapter concludes with a chronology of the general's life and career.

A reader unfamiliar with British military culture will stumble on some issues: the acronyms are completely different: GOC and KCB to give only two examples. (General Officer Commanding and Knight Commander of the Bath---a knighthood that gives the individual the title of "Sir.") The practice of keeping generals on half-pay is another practice that is often referenced but never explained. (A general without an assignment received only half his pay. If he did not receive an assignment after two years, he was retired.)

Nonetheless, this book is easy to read and is recommended without reservation.
This is another of the biography collections covering World War II generals that was done in the early 90s by a British publisher. In this book we get an introductory essay by editor John Keegan that puts the rest of the book in context, describing how Churchill dealt with generals, what he thought of them, and how he related to them, briefly. After that, we have a series of short (each about 20-30 pages) biographies of various commanders from the British Army in World War II. The editor chose to restrict himself to officers from Britain itself, so no Guy Simonds or Bernard Freyburg. He chose commanders who had some influence on the outcome of the war, or who were somehow outstanding or memorable, so no Miles Dempsey. Instead, the editor chose those soldiers who stood out in some way, or were somehow instrumental in the victory in a fashion that can't be ignored.

Within this, as is usually the case in such a volume, the individual biographies are somewhat uneven. Some are written as if you know everything already about World War II, and others are written in a very elementary style, as if you know nothing. Some are also more editorial or review of the individual's character and actions (the essay on Montgomery is the most obvious one in this category) while other seek merely to inform you about the person involved. There are two combination biographies, one covering the "Desert Generals" (Cunningham, Ritchie, and Leese) and another covering two generals who were more involved in diplomacy during the war, Adrian Carton de Wiart and Edward Spears. These tend to do little more than recount the facts of these men's careers: there's no space for anything else.

I think the general researcher who's looking for a reference work covering this topic will find this book useful, if only in a limited fashion. Since the coverage is rather limited, you're going to be disappointed if a particular soldier isn't covered here and he's the one you're trying to research. On the other hand, if you are looking for information on someone who *is* here, then you're going to get more data here than you would from the Harper Encyclopedia of Military Biography, for instance. So it depends on whom you're researching.