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by Andrew Wheatcroft
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Middle East
  • Author:
    Andrew Wheatcroft
  • ISBN:
    0140168796
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140168792
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Books; Reprint edition (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Middle East
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1164 kb
  • ePUB format
    1817 kb
  • DJVU format
    1519 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    924
  • Formats:
    doc mbr mobi azw


The Ottomans: Dissolving Images Hardcover – May 3, 1994. by Andrew Wheatcroft (Author).

The Ottomans: Dissolving Images Hardcover – May 3, 1994. Andrew Wheatcroft opens his book by saying that he does not wish to write a full-blown history of the Ottoman Empire, as these already exist, mentioning Lord Kinross' book as an example. Indeed that is a first-class history. Rather, Wheatcroft continues, he wants to write about & idea of the Ottomans and how in the West that idea became so completely divorced from the reality".

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Ottomans: Dissolving Images as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Andrew Wheatcroft opens his book by saying that he does not wish to write a full-blown history of the Ottoman Empire, as. .

Andrew Wheatcroft opens his book by saying that he does not wish to write a full-blown history of the Ottoman Empire, as these already exist, mentioning Lord Kinross' book as an example. Questioning the image of "Turk the terrible". com User, July 12, 2000.

The Ottomans were all - and none - of these. In this book the author teases out those qualities which were uniquely Ottoman. Not Turkish, not Middle Eastern, nor even a shadowy echo of the west. For the Ottomans, born warriors from the steppes of Central Asia, became a unique urban culture, the successors of Rome in a political sense but quite unlike any culture before or since.

His book doesn't contain anything startlingly new as far as the & life'' of the Ottomans is concerned, nor is this culture & neglected,'' as claimed.

Author of Infidels, The Ottomans, The enemy at the gate, World Atlas of Revolutions, The Habsburgs, The . The Ottomans: Dissolving Images.

Author of Infidels, The Ottomans, The enemy at the gate, World Atlas of Revolutions, The Habsburgs, The Road to War, The life and times of Shaikh Salman bin Hamad Al-Khalifa, Bahrain in Original Photographs. The enemy at the gate: Habsburgs, Ottomans and the battle for Europe.

The Ottomans: dissolving images more. by Andrew Wheatcroft. More Info: June 2013. It was originally published in 1993 and the progress of Ottoman studies since then has been extraordinary

The Ottomans: dissolving images more. It was originally published in 1993 and the progress of Ottoman studies since then has been extraordinary. However, there is more to say now on the 'dissolving images' theme of the book than was possible the first time around. Publication Date: Mar 1, 1993.

Andrew Wheatcroft is the author of many pioneerign books on early modern adn modern history, including The Ottomans (1993) and The Enemy at the Gate (2008). he is based in Dumfriesshire adn is Professor and Director of the Centre for Publishing Studies at the University of Stirling. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

Andrew Wheatcroft - The Enemy at the Gate: Habsburgs, Ottomans, and the Battle for Europe. Читать pdf. Andrew Wheatcroft - Infidels: A history of the Conflict between Christendom and Islam. Andrew Wheen - Dot-Dash to Do. om: How Modern Telecommunications Evolved from the Telegraph to the Internet (Springer Praxis Books Popular Science).

The Ottoman Empire was a "mystery wrapped inside the enigma". This book aims to unravel the mystery in two ways. Firstly, it looks at the Ottomans and their world in terms relevant to an eastern Islamic society, with its own principles and practices that seemed merely barbaric to the West. The book also comes to terms with the West's expectations of the Ottomans. The author's aim is both to tell the story and offer some explanation. The book interprets the Ottomans, to make sense of a society that to Western eyes seemed feckless and utterly corrupt, cruel and craven by turns. It was frequently all of these things but not without reason or cause.

Macill
This is a very good book and explains the Ottoman empire very well.
Mamuro
The book was deleveried within the time quoted and was in the exact condition as stated on the website. Thank you for the service, I am very satisfied.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
Andrew Wheatcroft opens his book by saying that he does not wish to write a full-blown history of the Ottoman Empire, as these already exist, mentioning Lord Kinross' book ["The Ottoman Centuries"] as an example. Indeed that is a first-class history. Rather, Wheatcroft continues, he wants to write about `the idea of the Ottomans and how in the West that idea became so completely divorced from the reality". I am not sure that THE OTTOMANS represents a successful attempt at doing that, but it is a very interesting book, well-worth reading for anyone with a desire to spend some hours thinking about the Turkish past.
The two last chapters, on `the lustful Turk' and `the terrible Turk', truly delve into the construction and propagation of these commonly-held European images of the Ottomans, images that have not yet quite died off. Elsewhere, Wheatcroft occasionally remarks on or talks briefly about such images as they grew, but his work is more like a very interesting tour of some aspects of Ottoman life and history. His fine descriptions of battles and sieges---the initial siege and fall of Constantinople, the battle of Mohacs, the sieges of Vienna in 1529 and 1683---do not really fit into his theme. The full chapter spent on telling how the proud, corrupt and troublesome janissaries were finally destroyed provide a fascinating story, but are not about `the idea of the Ottomans'. While describing Ottoman institutions like the harem or army and the city of Stamboul itself, we can look through European eyes to some extent, thus coming closer to the theme, and the process of change, discussed in Chapter 6, called "Dreams from the Rose Pavilion: the Meandering Path of Reform", also involves European interpretations of the need for reforms and European estimations of their success. One of the highlights of THE OTTOMANS is the fine collection of pictures done by European artists---definitely a European view of the Turkish past. Not as much is made of these as could be: they might have been the center of the whole book.
I liked Wheatcroft's constant attempt to make readers consider the exaggerations of the past, to make Western readers realize that the Ottoman Empire, despite its faults, was one of the major political entities of the world for over 400 years. For much of that time it had institutions that rivalled or outshone those of the West. Even when the Industrial Revolution and the concomitant rise of modern warfare tilted the scales of power towards the West, many European opinions of Turkish cruelty, corruption, or lack of cleanliness neglected European shortcomings in identical areas. If Westerners are ever going to accept Turkey as a member of the European community or merely as an equal ally and partner, a realization of these centuries of propaganda is a must. If you are looking for an academically useful book on the Ottoman Empire, this is probably not it. If, on the other hand, you just want a fascinating, well-illustrated book that is clearly-written and lucid, giving you details of a fascinating sweep of history, you will enjoy THE OTTOMANS. It could be the jumping off place for wider readings in Ottoman history and culture. And it helps set the record straight.
Mojar
Either the author lost his focus or he became bored with his subject. That's the impression left after reading the final chapters of what the title implied would be a short history of the Turkish people known to history as The Ottomans.
In the early chapters, when Andrew Wheatcroft wrote of the stirrings of the fierce people of Anatolia (today's Turkey), how they organized under their dedication to Islamic belief, he adequately captured the drama of the time. When he described the blow-by-blow account of the fall of Constantinople, the jewel of the Byzantine World, in the mid-15th Century, a general reader's interest was whetted. The best was yet to come -- or so the reader thought.
But -- alas -- the best didn't come. The book petered out. A good start but no follow through.
It became clear though, that Mr. Wheatcroft wanted to leave his readers with the notion that the Ottomans -- that is the Turkish Ottomans -- were and are opposed to modernization and change. He went into great detail reporting that in the 18th and 19th Centuries, when successive sultans tried to change the ancient, clumsy and archaic war methods and dress of the janissary warriors, they met with rebellion. Change was not welcome, Mr. Wheatcroft wrote. It was bitterly opposed, even to death.
So purposefully does the author push this theme of abhorence to change, that in the final chapters he barely mentioned the explosive changes made in the 20th Century by Kemal Atatürk who was, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica:
"One of the great figures of the 20th century, Atatürk rescued the surviving Turkish remnant of the defeated Ottoman Empire at the end of World War I. He galvanized his people against invading Greek forces who sought to impose the Allied will upon the war-weary Turks and repulsed aggression by British, French, and Italian troops. Through these struggles, he founded the modern Republic of Turkey, for which he is still revered by the Turks. He succeeded in restoring to his people pride in their Turkishness, coupled with a new sense of accomplishment as their backward nation was brought into the modern world.
"He modernized the country's legal and educational systems and encouraged the adoption of a European way of life, with Turkish written in the Latin alphabet and with citizens adopting European-style names."
None of this in Wheatcroft's book. Instead he snagged on the concept that followers of Islam -- and Turks, in particular, were incapable of change. Instead, the author wrote chapters entitled "The Terrible Turk", "The Lustful Turk" and in one unbelievable departure from objective historical reporting and good taste, he wrote (p 234) that the Ottomans "were bloodthirsty savages."
So much for the effect of enlightenment in the Western World where Mr. Wheatcroft does his teaching and writing. I can only recommend this book as a study of crude anti-Islamic propaganda.
Perilanim
Wheatcroft's book fills a niche on the shelf. It is not a dry recitation of dates and historical facts, nor is it a complex analysis of causes and effects in the Ottoman empire. Instead it is a brief and fascinating look at certain specific scenes: the fall of Constantinople, the harem, the janissaries, Abdul Hamid "The Red Sultan", the seige of Vienna. Using these elements as jumping off points, Wheatcroft exposes western myths about the Ottomans and with broad strokes traces the rise and fall of the empire. This book may not provide enough grist for committed scholars but it is wonderfully readable, well-researched, and colorful. It is an excellent first or second book on the subject for those interested in a vivid and balanced overview of the Ottoman empire.
Gavirim
I liked this book by Andrew Wheatcroft. In the introduction, he made it certain to the readerwhat he wasn't going to do, which was the entire history of the Ottaman Empire. What he does is clear up some misconceptions about the old Turkish Empire, and how they related to developments in Western Europe. If you want a defininitive book on the Turkish Empire, you should read Lord Kinross's The Ottoman Centuries or Palmer's book. Wheatcroft relates the images of the Lustful Turk, and discards those images into the trash can. What emerges is a very conservative Islamic society trying to cope with the West and not being very successful at it. The Sick Man of Europe did indeed die, but for the after effects read David Fromkin's A Peace to End All Peace.