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by John Lukacs
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Historical Study & Educational Resources
  • Author:
    John Lukacs
  • ISBN:
    0300169566
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300169560
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; First Edition edition (April 26, 2012)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical Study & Educational Resources
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1421 kb
  • ePUB format
    1523 kb
  • DJVU format
    1899 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    780
  • Formats:
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John Lukacs is the author of some thirty books of history, including the acclaimed Five Days in London and, most . We cannot know much about the future, save projecting what we can see at present: but so much of that will not come about.

We cannot know much about the future, save projecting what we can see at present: but so much of that will not come about.

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The Future of History book. John Lukacs has written a challenging and enlightening book that examines the role of history in our thinking culture and subconscious. I find this one of the most interesting books I've ever had the opportunity of reading. It is really an examination of how we as individuals like to think about our world and what we believe it to be. A sense of the past and some kind of interest in it will always exist.

John Adalbert Lukacs (/ˈluːkəs/; Hungarian: Lukács János Albert; 31 January 1924 – 6 May 2019) was a Hungarian-born American historian who wrote more than thirty books, including Five Days in London, May 1940 and A New Republic

John Adalbert Lukacs (/ˈluːkəs/; Hungarian: Lukács János Albert; 31 January 1924 – 6 May 2019) was a Hungarian-born American historian who wrote more than thirty books, including Five Days in London, May 1940 and A New Republic. He was a professor of history at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia from 1947 to 1994 and chaired that department from 1947 to 1974.

A master historian explores the critical future of history writing and teaching. For more than sixty years, John Lukacs has been writing, teaching, and reading about the past. In this inspired volume, he turns his attention to the future. Throughout The Future of History, Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective. History at its best, he contends, is personal and participatory.

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Throughout "The Future of History," Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective

Throughout "The Future of History," Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective.

The Future of History.

Throughout The Future of History, Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective

Throughout The Future of History, Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective.

In September 1952, John Lukacs, then a young and unknown historian, wrote George . John Lukacs is the author of more than twenty-five books, including A Thread of Years and, most recently, The Future of History.

In September 1952, John Lukacs, then a young and unknown historian, wrote George Kennan (1904-2005), the . ambassador to the Soviet Union, asking one of the nation's best-known diplomats what he thought of Lukacs's own views on Kennan's widely debated idea of containing rather than militarily confronting the Soviet Union. A month later, to Lukacs's surprise, he received a personal reply from Kennan. So began an exchange of letters that would continue for more than fifty years.

For more than sixty years, John Lukacs has been writing, teaching, and reading about the past. In this inspired volume, he turns his attention to the future. Throughout The Future of History, Lukacs reflects on his discipline, eloquently arguing that the writing and teaching of history are literary rather than scientific, comprising knowledge that is neither wholly objective nor subjective. History at its best, he contends, is personal and participatory.

Despite a recently unprecedented appetite for history among the general public, as evidenced by history television program ratings, sales of popular history books, and increased participation in local historical societies, Lukacs believes that the historical profession is in a state of disarray. He traces a decline in history teaching throughout higher education, matched by a corresponding reduction in the number of history students. He reviews a series of short-lived fads within the profession that have weakened the fundamentals of the field. In looking for a way forward, Lukacs explores the critical relationships between history and literature, including ways in which novelists have contributed to historical understanding. Through this startling and enlightening work, readers will understand Lukacs's assertion that "everything has its history, including history" and that history itself has a future, since everything we know comes from the past.


Perius
John Lukacs is an elderly (b. 1924), Hungarian-born, American historian who has written numerous books about Europe during the Second World War, as well as two prior volumes treating the philosophy of history. In this short, somewhat pessimistic, volume (perhaps "long essay" would be a better description), Lukacs criticizes, among other things, the pandering of the historical profession to contemporary intellectual fads. The author's comprehensive learning is everywhere evident as he ranges through nineteenth-century historical and literary works for his illustrations; and the persistent reader will find insights throughout.

Unfortunately Lukacs takes pleasure in presenting his notions in an idiosyncratic style--the privilege of learned old men, perhaps, but not the best way to engage students of history. Below are some sentences that may allow the prospective reader to judge for himself:

"We cannot know much about the future, save projecting what we can see at present: but so much of that will not come about. Some of it will. Foresight is something else than prophecy: foresight depends on a serious, sometimes inspired knowledge and understanding of some things in the past. Through this some of us may know that this or that will not happen; but also that this or that, lo and behold, might." (139-40)

"Anyhow: it is arguable and more rather than less evident that by the beginning of the twenty-first century much of an age that began about five centuries ago has passed. And also that the twentieth was an especially transient century (of course every century is transient in some ways), but the twentieth was, historically thinking and speaking, a short century too, seventy-five years long, from 1914 to 1989, marked by two gigantic world wars (and then the so-called Cold War was but a consequence of the Second). No reason here to argue further what is, or should be, obvious." (161-62)
Malalanim
Excellent writing. Pragmatic and well sourced.
Vushura
It is a testament to the sad state of American academic publishing that nobody at Yale University Press, supposedly one of the leading academic presses in the United States, had the editorial power, or courage, to prevent this sad bundle of senile ramblings of a once-great historian from being published. Even for someone sympathetic with Professor Lukacs dislike of social history and minority histories, reading through page after page of disjointed thoughts and stale aperçus must be a painful experience. Readers interested in an intellectually challenging handling of the supposed topic of this book should consult the works of Reinhart Koselleck instead, particularly "Futures Past. On the Semantics of Historical Time", "The Practice of Conceptual History. Timing History, Spacing Concepts" and, if you read German, "Vom Sinn und Unsinn der Geschichte".