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by Charles Firth
Download Oliver Cromwell and the Rule of the Puritans in England fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    Charles Firth
  • ISBN:
    1410209245
  • ISBN13:
    978-1410209245
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Press of the Pacific (November 4, 2003)
  • Pages:
    580 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1961 kb
  • ePUB format
    1168 kb
  • DJVU format
    1558 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    380
  • Formats:
    lit lrf txt doc


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Shop for Books on Google Play. Oliver Cromwell and the rule of the Puritans in England. Charles Harding Firth. Putnam, 1900 - 496 pages. From inside the book. CONTENTS CHAPTER I. 19. The long parliament 16401642. 47. The first campaign 1642. 19 other sections not shown

Firth, C. H. (Charles Harding), 1857-1936. Book digitized by Google from the library of University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Firth, C. (Charles Harding), 1857-1936 You can read Oliver Cromwell And the Rule of the Puritans in England by Firth, C. (Charles Harding), 1857-1936 in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Cromwell, Oliver, 1599-1658, Great Britain - History Commonwealth and Protectorate, 1649-1660, Great Britain - History Civil War, 1642-1649, genealogy.

Charles Firth, a British historian, wrote this book in 1900. As I was not initially accustomed to his writing style, I was somewhat slow to get into the book. However, once I had gotten used to his style, I found the book to be a fun read. The period comprising English Civil War and Cromwell’s rule was exceedingly complex, with many different interest groups and changing alliances. Mr. Firth wrote in such a way as to allow the reader to make sense of this complexity without oversimplifying the situation.

Oliver Cromwell and the Rule of the Puritans in England. The New model Army was made up of the ordinary people of England. Mostly peasants and tenant farmers and several large land owners, who were sick to death of the tyranny and taxes of Charles. The difference that made them successful was basic but effective discipline on the battlefield. Whereas the Cavaliers cavalry would charge, and when they would rout a Roundhead position, they would go on their merry way looting and pillaging the local towns and villages.

Oliver Cromwell served England during a time when King Charles I of England and his Parliament went from disagreement to open warfare

Oliver Cromwell served England during a time when King Charles I of England and his Parliament went from disagreement to open warfare. During the war Cromwell rose through the ranks of the army and became it's leader because he was an outstanding warrior, tactician and leader of men. After Charles I was defeated, he was tried in a court of law, found guilty of treason and beheaded. Then Cromwell reluctantly replaced him as the ruler of England, Ireland and Scotland. He refused the title of King and ruled as the Protector.

Автор: Firth Charles Harding Название: Then and Now, or a Comparison Between the War with Napoleon and the Present . Описание: This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Описание: This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

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Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland "and of the dominions thereto belonging" from 1653 until his. He served as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland "and of the dominions thereto belonging" from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic. Cromwell was born into the middle gentry to a family descended from the sister of King Henry VIII's minister Thomas Cromwell.

For nearly 200 year after his death so little was known of Oliver Cromwell's personal views and motives that he was generally regarded as, in Hume's words, "a hypocritical fanatic." Carlyle's researches were sufficient to refute the charge of hypocrisy, but not until the beginning of the 20th century was a sufficient mass of documents and personal correspondence assembled to make possible a just and balanced account of Cromwell's life. Sir Charles Firth's biography, first published in 1900, presents such an account, and in the years that have passed since the book was written, it has become generally recognized as a standard work, soundly informative as history and worthy of preservation as literature.

The_NiGGa
Dozens of biographies and historical studies have been written about Oliver Cromwell. Each views him from a different perspective; he has been seen as a dictator, a liberator, a tyrant, and a military genius. Protestants are more likely to picture him as an heroic savior; Catholics, and particularly Irish Catholics, as a cruel oppressor.

Oliver Cromwell and the Rule of the Puritans in England takes a more balanced and beneficent view of Cromwell the man as well as of Cromwell the leader. Charles Firth published the work in 1900; its Victorian prose is rich and ornate something I regard as agreeable and refreshing though some contemporary readers may find it cumbersome.

Cromwell became a member of Parliament in 1629 but his rise to power lay less in political adroitness than in his skills as a military commander. Though lacking formal military training his singular martial talents elevated him, along with the aristocratic Thomas Fairfax, into command of the Parliament’s Pilgrim-dominated army. It was largely his leadership which brought defeat to the Catholic opposition in both of the bloody internecine 17th century civil wars. After the beheading of King Charles I, Cromwell was named Lord Protector, head of what was to be called the Commonwealth.

Indisputably a deeply religious man, Cromwell served as Protector until his death in 1660. Firth pictures him as a largely wise and moderate leader, more religiously tolerant than most politicians of his day. He did his best to restore stability and order after the chaos of civil war. On the other hand, forces under his command waged a cruel war to suppress Catholicism in Ireland. As suggested above, Cromwell’s legacy remains deeply controversial. Charles Firth has written a significant study in his favor.
Bloodhammer
Although the material is comprehensive, the writing style and language lends itself to making it difficult to follow, and not a pleasant read. The author assumes the reader is already familiar with many of the players of the period such as Lilburn, Ormond, Sweden's Gustavus, the Levellers organization, and the finer distinction of the religious denominations of the Puritans, Presbyterians, Baptists and thus introduces them into the text as if already done so. This requires frequent reference to Wikipedia. Although the book is not intended to be an account of the English Civil War, the context of Cromwell' s life totally defines his life, and the author should have made a better attempt to make the context clear, spend less time on meaningless detail (number of votes on a bill). In the end, I recognize that Cromwell was a great man, but could not determine if he was a great scoundrel.
Hunaya
This book nicely filled in a period in English history I knew little about. I knew Cromwell was a kahuna but never really knew how he fit in to the larger story. Gives a great deal of insight into the British evolution toward a more people-centered governing system.
Dakora
I found this to be a very compelling depiction of Cromwell and the brief rule of the Puritans in 17th century England. The mixture of a man of deep and abiding faith with a surprisingly successful "self-taught" military leader provides an interesting story. This is my first book about Cromwell so I have no sense about any bias the author may have inserted in the work. If you've never read about "The Protector" this is a good place to jump in.
Llathidan
While written many years ago, I found the work very enjoyable. Getting use to a writing style and language usage from another era was a little challenging.
I found the writers perspective to agree with the current historical view of many objective students of history.
Rare
Not quite a 5 star, but well written and it explains what folks were arguing about very well. The situation was much more complex than I thought it was. I had a distinctly negative view of Cromwell, but he comes out much better than I thought he would. In a totally intolerant world, he is one of the more tolerant people around at the time, although not tolerant by modern standards. Good reminder that we usually judge historical figures harsher than they deserve. He was also a great military commander, self taught mostly, but it was a vocation he was meant for. He is was also a talented politician who seemed to have an ability to sway public opinion, at least in the short term and he ran a very effective foreign policy. He wanted a Republic, but given the times, England was not quite ready for it. The study of Cromwell and his time was an important one for our fore fathers when they were debating how to make a Republic work at the Constitutional Convention. We need checks and balances more than ever now.
Kazimi
Information is balanced using Cromwell s own words and the thoughts of his contemporaries some hindsight s but mostly just the fact s
The author makes a good attempt of giving an objective picture of the English Civil War and Cromwell's part in it.