» » Ultra in the West: The Campaign of 1944-45

Download Ultra in the West: The Campaign of 1944-45 fb2

by Ralph Bennett
Download Ultra in the West: The Campaign of 1944-45 fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    Ralph Bennett
  • ISBN:
    0091393302
  • ISBN13:
    978-0091393304
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hutchinson; First Edition edition (November 1979)
  • Pages:
    305 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1763 kb
  • ePUB format
    1597 kb
  • DJVU format
    1616 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    904
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi lrf azw


Ultra in the West book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Ultra in the West book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Ultra in the West: The Normandy Campaign, 1944-45.

BENNETT, RALPH (Author) Hutchinson (Publisher). The campaign in north-west europe 1944-45. In 1944, at the height of activity, up to half a million were based there with the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF)

BENNETT, RALPH (Author) Hutchinson (Publisher). Montgomery, the Field Marshal a critical study of the generalship of Field Marshal, the Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, . Related content. In 1944, at the height of activity, up to half a million were based there with the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Their job was to man and maintain the vast fleets of aircraft needed to attack German cities and industry. Imperial War Museums home Connect with IWM.

Published by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1980. Condition: Fine Hardcover. As well, cash, check or money are also acceptable. From Palm Beach Rare Book Co. (Palm Beach Garedens, FL, . Price: US$ 3. 0 Convert Currency.

North-West Europe campaign of 1944–45. North-West Europe 1944–1945 is a battle honour (more properly known as an honorary distinction) earned by regiments of the British Commonwealth forces during the Second World War that took part in the actions of the northern part of the war's Western Front. The battle honour North-West Europe is suffixed with the year, or years, in which the awarded unit took part in the action.

The Russian Campaigns of 1944-45 (London: Penguin, 1946). Ultra in the West (London: Hutchinson, 1979). Ambrose, Stephen E. 'Eisenhower and the Intelligence Community in World War 11. Journal of Contemporary History, vol. 16 (1981). The British Secret Service and Anglo-Soviet Relations in the 1920s'. Historical Journal, vol. 20, no. 3 (1977). Bennett, Ralph, 'Ultra and Some Command Decisions'. In Walter Laqueur (e., The Second World War (London and Beverley Hills, Calif.

Paywall-free reading of new articles posted daily online and almost a century of archives.

Ultra's contribution to the Allied victory is the last great untold story of World War II. Ralph Bennett, who spent his war years decoding German signals at Bletchley Park, here reconstructs what really happened behind the scenes in the campaign for Europe's liberation. Writing with knowledge of more than 25,000 decoded signals, Bennett explains how the top secret decoding of German radio traffic affected the fighting-- from Normandy landings to the German surrender eleven months later. He describes the astonishing success of the deception plan that kept German men and tanks away from Montgomery's front in the dangerous early days of the build up holding them idle around Calais, waiting for an assault the Allied command never intended to make. And the author shows how Montgomery could later watch every stage of the concentration of German armor around Caen, receiving enough advance warning of the arrival of two crack SS Panzer divisions from the Russian front to bring them to a dead stop the moment they attackes.

Mettiarrb
I agree entirely with the review of "John W"...if one is a serious reader of WW2 or a military historian researcher, this book is a 5-star read and very informative.

For a more casual reader, it can get a bit much with the corps and division movements of the German army moving north and south, etc. I'm not sure I followed the more technical maneuvering aspects of the book and there's quite a bit of that.

The whole Bletchley Park mission, however, is fascinating in itself. The mysterious, top-secret spywork going on in this charming mansion, populated by people with varying and eccentric talents (linguists, mathematicians and puzzle masters of varying backgrounds) is an area I'd like to know more about, This book doesn't delve there, however, but is strictly concerned with the decoded Enigma messages and how they helped the Allies (or were ignored).

While I was reading the book, the last surviving cryptographer, Jerry Roberts, died. His obit quotes him as saying that the cracking of the code was "a miracle". Bravo - What a great job they did!
Zyangup
Although I have not started reading it yet I am looking forward to doing so. I have read another book by this author which I enjoyed.

Fred Strong
Nalmezar
This is a good book for someone who is a serious student of WWII. It is very detailed and focuses on a very specific time period. However, it may not be a good choice for someone who is only mildly interested in WWII, the Enigma cipher, and the British Ultra decryption effort. The book only covers the period of D-day to the end of the war and there is almost no information about the nature of the deciphering effort per se. Each chapter begins with a few pages summarizing the period covered in that chapter, followed by an analysis of how the Ultra decrypts were, or were not used, and how they impacted the course of the war.

The author worked at Bletchley Park, specifically in Hut 3, which had the responsibility of translating and annotating the decoded messages from the German Army and Air Force (there was a similar and parallel effort for the German Navy). This entailed keeping a detailed card file on all of the decoded messages and correlating previous ones with current ones. This was critical because in the field the messages themselves had to be destroyed after they were read (lest the fact that the German Enigma cipher was broken fall into German hands), so no such archive could be kept locally; that was the job of Hut 3. Comments and annotations enabled one to draw inferences from the messages and put them into the proper context. The motion of a division could be correlated with those of other divisions, showing a clear trend and possible offensive. Even the transfer of an individual technical expert could be important, several could point to a movement of some area of production or employment.

This book is very detailed. It is great if you want to know about individual German divisions and commanders, but the details can be a bit overwhelming for someone who is more interested in the "big picture". For that readership I recommend "Ultra Goes to War" by R. Lewin. It is also about how "Ultra" affected the course of WII, but it is a bit more general and it covers the whole war. I would also recommend Lewin's book for serious WWII students and I recommend that it be read before "Ultra in the West".

"Ultra in the West" has numerous helpful maps, a chronology of events covered in the book, brief notes on the German army and their tanks and planes, single paragraph biographies of many the Germans mentioned in the book, and examples of Ultra signals. After the brief summary of the material covered in each chapter, the body of each chapter discusses individual Ultra decrypts (with the decrypt identification listed in the margin). I was most interested in the major questions that were addressed. For instance: what was impact of the Ultra decrypts on D-day, how did Ultra influence the breakout from Normandy, did Ultra show that there were German Panzer divisions in Arnhem (and why was this information ignored), did Ultra give any indication of the German Ardennes offensive and did Ultra give a false impression of a final Alpine Redoubt.
Eayaroler
This is a good book for someone who is a serious student of WWII. It is very detailed and focuses on a very specific time period. However, it may not be a good choice for someone who is only mildly interested in WWII, or in the Enigma cipher and the British Ultra decoding effort. The book only covers the period of D-day to the end of the war and there is almost no information about the nature of the deciphering effort per se. Each chapter begins with a few pages summarizing the period covered in that chapter, followed by an analysis of how the Ultra decrypts were, or were not used, and how they impacted the course of the war.

The author worked at Bletchley Park, specifically in Hut 3, which had the responsibility of translating and annotating the decoded messages from the German Army and Air Force (there was a similar and parallel effort for the German Navy). This entailed keeping a detailed card file on all of the decoded messages and correlating previous ones with current ones. This was critical because in the field the messages themselves had to be destroyed after they were read (lest the fact that the German Enigma cipher was broken fall into German hands), so no such archive could be kept locally; that was the job of Hut 3. Comments and annotations enabled one to draw inferences from the messages and put them into the proper context. The motion of a division could be correlated with those of other divisions, showing a clear trend and possible offensive. Even the transfer of an individual technical expert could be important, several could point to a movement of some area of production or employment.

This book is very detailed. It is great if you want to know about individual German divisions and commanders, but the details can be a bit overwhelming for someone who is more interested in the "big picture". For that readership I recommend "Ultra Goes to War" by R. Lewin. It is also about how "Ultra" affected the course of WII, but it is a bit more general and it covers the whole war. I would also recommend Lewin's book for serious WWII students and I recommend that it be read before "Ultra in the West".

"Ultra in the West" has numerous helpful maps, a chronology of events covered in the book, brief notes on the German army and their tanks and planes, single paragraph biographies of many the Germans mentioned in the book, and examples of Ultra signals. After the brief summary of the material covered in each chapter, the body of each chapter discusses individual Ultra decrypts (with the decrypt identification listed in the margin). Frankly, I found myself skimming over much of this detailed information. I was most interested in the major questions that were addressed. For instance: what was impact of the Ultra decrypts on D-day, how did Ultra influence the breakout from Normandy, did Ultra show that there were German Panzer divisions in Arnhem (and why was this information ignored), did Ultra give any indication of the German Ardenes offensive and did Ultra give a false impression of a final Alpine Redoubt. I found this aspect of the book very informative, but it is buried under an inordinate amount of detail; this is great for those looking for this level of detail, but may bore others.