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by Mike Ashley
Download King Arthur: The Man and the Legend Revealed fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    Mike Ashley
  • ISBN:
    0762438975
  • ISBN13:
    978-0762438976
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Running Press (June 8, 2010)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1906 kb
  • ePUB format
    1457 kb
  • DJVU format
    1939 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    124
  • Formats:
    rtf azw docx lit


5 Gildas – The Man Who Knew Arthur. 10 The Real King Arthur – The Twenty Claimants .

5 Gildas – The Man Who Knew Arthur. 6 Nennius’s Old Papers. Section 2: The Legend Grows. The Arthur of legend has been constantly recreated and reborn, a multiple personality composed of a myriad of historical Arthurs. This section retells his story, and those of his companions, allowing us to identify the originals.

The Mammoth Book of King Arthur. Sifting fact from fancy, Mike Ashley reveals the originals not only of King Arthur but also of Merlin

The Mammoth Book of King Arthur. The most complete guide ever to the real Arthurian world and the legends that surround it He defeated the Saxons so decisively at the Battle of Badon that he held the Saxon invasion of Britain at bay for at least a generation. He has inspired more stories, books and films than any other historical or legendary figure. Sifting fact from fancy, Mike Ashley reveals the originals not only of King Arthur but also of Merlin. Guinevere, Lancelot and the knights of the Round Table - as well as all the major Arthurian sites.

Sifting fact from fancy, Mike Ashley reveals the originals not only of King Arthur but also of Merlin. He traces each of the legends as they developed and brilliantly shows how they were later used to inspire major works of art, poetry, fiction and film.

Ashley gives us a firm identity not only for King Arthur, but also for Merlin, Guinevere, Lancelot, and the Knights of the Round Table†as well as identifying all the major Arthurian sites. He traces the development of each of the legends and shows how they were related to events happening at the time, bringing a new dimension of realism to the magical Arthurian world.

He has a special interest in fiction magazines and has written a multi-volume History of the Science Fiction Magazine and a study of British fiction magazines, The Age of the Storytellers

The legend and the facts behind King Arthur. This book was pretty reader-friendly.

The legend and the facts behind King Arthur. Historian Mike Ashley makes the case that no single man was King Arthur; rather, the legends grew up around several heroes of the Dark Ages. Mike Ashley does a great job of sifting through the people and places, while providing information on the changes that took place with their names over time.

Ashley gives us a firm identity not only for King Arthur . But if you need one good book on King Arthur, with a strong concentration on the pre-Galfridian material and the relevant historical background, this is probably the one to get - you certainly won't beat the price. 64 people found this helpful. With women having children at early ages and men fathering children even into old age (which wasn't that old in the Dark Ages), only a few generations could completely throw Ashley's time-scale way off. Just three generations of people having children at age 20 could throw the scale off by up to 30 years!

Mike Ashley is the author of the bestselling Brief History of the Kings and Queens of England and has been fascinated by the story of King Arthur for decades. He lives in Chatham, Britain. Country of Publication.

Mike Ashley is the author of the bestselling Brief History of the Kings and Queens of England and has been fascinated by the story of King Arthur for decades. History & Military.

The legend of king arthur The legend of Arthur has influenced dozens of films, including King Arthur in 2004 starring Keira Knightley and Clive Owen, and 1967's Camelot with Richard.

The legend of king arthur. Thought to have lived during the late fifth and early sixth centuries, the original King Arthur is believed to have led the fight against the invading Saxons. What I did, I sat down with the standard books on place names in England and Scotland and I reckoned every single one of them could be identified. The legend of Arthur has influenced dozens of films, including King Arthur in 2004 starring Keira Knightley and Clive Owen, and 1967's Camelot with Richard Harris and Vanessa Redgrave.

Who was the real King Arthur? What do the historical documents tell us about the knight of the Round Table? Is it just a chivalric fantasy? Mike Ashley revisits the source material and uncovers unexpected new insights into the legend. There is clear evidence that the Arthurian legends arose from the exploits of not just one man, but at least three originating in Wales, Scotland, and Brittany. The true historical Arthur really existed and is distantly related to the present royal family in England.

Ballazan
This is called A Brief History because it's basically half of the larger volume "The Mammoth Book of King Arthur" by the same author. It essentially analyzes the historical basis for King Arthur whereas "Mammoth" also explores possible identities of other major characters from the Arthurian legend as well. It is only "brief" in comparison to "Mammoth" because trust me, there is nothing truly brief about this. It is a very detailed, very in depth look at the time period in which Arthur must have existed (if he did) and all the possible individuals who may have been the inspiration for Arthur, which may have been one or a combination of historical leaders.

It essentially defines Arthur as the victor of the Battle of Badon and then goes about narrowing down the likely date for Badon and analyzing which historical figures lived during this time period and might have contributed to the legend of Arthur.

It's very interesting and worth reading but the nature of the subject matter makes it not very easy to follow if you're not already familiar with the historical sources, events, and figures from this time period. Don’t take this on lightly but do take it on if you're interested in the historical basis for the legend of King Arthur.
Thordibandis
I'm very glad I read this book when I did; that is before I had come to the conclusion that searching for a 'real' Arthur is an excercise in futility. I'm glad that I read it before I had been properly introduced to the early mythological texts, and while I was more open to the idea that Arthur's origin was as leader of the winning side at Mt. Badon.

At this point I can't look past the fact that Gildas' De Excidio, the one and only nearly-contemporary and clearly non-fictional document, not only doesn't mention Arthur at all but explicitly attributes the victory to someone else. I didn't find Ashley's take on this point very convincing. He does acknowledge that Gildas may have omitted Arthur because he did not exist, but only in passing. In the end he concludes that this is not proof that Arthur did not exist, which of course it isn't. But that is emblematic of what I see as the problem with investigations of this nature; the onus is on the author to prove that Arthur did exist, and to this date no one anywhere has done so.

We have ample evidence of Arthur as a literary figure, both in clearly-fantastical works (Preiddeu Annwfn, Pa Gur Y Porthawr) and in what you might call early historical fiction (Historia Brittonum, Geoffrey). But we have no sturdy evidence at all for Arthur as a genuine historical figure, nothing that meets any decent standards of historical rigor. To make the case, authors like Ashley have to attach what real knowledge we have of that time and place to a name and character that constantly shifts between myth and history, that has changed and has gathered innumerable characteristics and connections over the centuries like a snowball rolling down a ski hill.

To Ashley's credit, he makes this job that much more manageable and reasonable by focusing only on "the Arthur of Badon", so his working assumption is that any real Arthur would have been the victor at Badon (see the Gildas problem above). That narrows things down, sort of, theoretically eliminating things like Excalibur from consideration. But he can't help but bring up the mythical sword as he mentions Gildas' phrase 'arms special to yourself'. It is a very tricky thing indeed to search for the 'real' person and still hold on to the impossible, wonderful figure who has inspired the search in the first place.

In the end I feel the book is flawed, collecting evidence and dismissing evidence to suit an assumption rather than looking broadly at the evidence to see where it leads. However, I enjoyed it throroughly at the time. There are so many little bits of information about this fascinating period of British history, and I had Google Maps open as I read, jumping around the British landscape looking at rivers and the shadows of old hillforts, trying to imagine all the battles and characters. There was even mention of a humble little stream in Oxfordshire where a friend of mine has a farm, as a possible site of one of the '12 battles'. It was fun, which is a surprising term to use for a book this dense and painstaking.

If you are fascinated with Arthur and are willing to dig deep into the particulars of the evidence, this is one I would encourage you to include on your reading list, even if I have my gripes with it. I would point you to Worlds Of Arthur as a companion, which takes a similarly-exhaustive approach and reaches a very different conclusion. Also, Concepts Of Arthur (my favorite book on the subject so far) looks at the sources pre-Geoffrey and comes to the conclusion (a more intellectually well-grounded one, in my view) that Arthur stands as a figure of myth and literature first, and a figure of pseudo-history second.

One barely needs to lift a finger to make the argument that Arthur is a fictional figure. This book, as much as I'm glad to have read it, is a testament to the kind of acrobatics required to show that he was, maybe, possibly, in part, historical too.
Jeyn
If you want to know about the lore of King Arthur, this is the book to read. And it is a good idea to get it from Robinson because it arrived in time for Christmas in excellent condition.
ChallengeMine
I always felt that Arthur was a true historical figure with just alot of myth wrapped around him. This book goes into depth trying to figure out was real and what wasn't and I really liked the journey!!
Scream_I LOVE YOU
This is a good read for those already familiar with the early history of Britain and its connection with the Roman Empire and also the early Christian Church. The names of people and places in those ancient times are hard to keep straight since there are so many and so many variations due to the different languages.

For the student, it's a feast. For the casual reader, not so much.
Nakora
Very interesting. Loved the History,
allegro
This book was excellent, very good reading, couldn't put it down. Would recommend to anyone interested in reading English history/mythology.
This book is a very used book altho offered as new: spine creases and a bent front cover is disappointing