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by Peter Dennis,Ian Castle
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Europe
  • Author:
    Peter Dennis,Ian Castle
  • ISBN:
    184908243X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674012844
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Osprey Publishing; First Edition edition (April 19, 2011)
  • Pages:
    80 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1932 kb
  • ePUB format
    1857 kb
  • DJVU format
    1439 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    212
  • Formats:
    txt docx lrf azw


Peter Dennis was born in 1950. Inspired by contemporary magazines such as Look and Learn he studied Illustration at Liverpool Art College.

Peter Dennis was born in 1950. Peter has since contributed to hundreds of books, predominantly on historical subjects, including many Osprey titles. This book is about an idylic crusade against foes(The German Zepplin Bases) hundreds of miles away with a technology (WW1 Biplanes)that could only stay airborne minutes at a time. For a short book no more than 30 pages,it creates quickly that time of pondorous untouchable air leviathans, cruising above your heads dropping bombs at will & the impotance of being able to strike back at them.

Mariusz is completing all the cover artwork for the Osprey Raid series. THE ZEPPELIN BASE RAIDS Germany 1914.

Publisher: Osprey Publishing. Mariusz is completing all the cover artwork for the Osprey Raid series. First published in great britain in 2011 by osprey publishing, midland house, west way, botley, oxford, 0X2 oph, UK 44-02 23RD st, suite 219, long island city, NY 11101, USA. Acknowledgments.

The Zeppelin Base Raids book.

by Ian Castle and Peter Dennis. In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the prospect of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other major British towns and cities loomed large. Britain's aerial defenses were negligible, while German armed forces mustered a total of eleven airships. The First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston S. Churchill, accepted responsibility for the defense of London, which translated to defense against Zeppelin attack.

Germany 1914 - In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the prospect of immediate Zeppelin raids .

Germany 1914 - In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the prospect of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other m. Castle, . Dennis, P. (Illustr. The Zeppelin Base Raids. English text, paperback, many bw- and colour illustrations, colour maps. We also recommend this article. Zeppelin vs British Home Defence 1916-18. 517/27/85 Osprey Publishing. 15,95 € . London 1914-1917. 517/2/193 Osprey Publishing.

Dennis C. Dickerson - African American Preachers and Politics: The Careys of Chicago (Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies). Ian Castle, Peter Dennis - The Zeppelin Base Raids - Germany 1914. Ian Castle, Peter Dennis. Читать pdf. Dennis C. Galvan - The State Must Be Our Master of Fire: How Peasants Craft Culturally Sustainable Development in Senegal. James K. Luiselli, Dennis C. Russo, Walter P. Christian, Susan M. Wilczynski - Effective practices for children with autism: educational and behavioral support interventions that work.

In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the spectre of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other major British towns and cities loomed large.

The Zeppelin base raids, Germany 1914. Are you sure you want to remove The Zeppelin base raids, Germany 1914 from your list? The Zeppelin base raids, Germany 1914. In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the spectre of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other major British towns and cities loomed large. When Winston Churchill accepted responsibility for the defence of London, he realized that Zeppelins were most vulnerable when on the ground. Despite limited resources, he believed that attack was the best form of defence.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Zeppelin Base Raids - Germany 1914. Crusader Castles of the Teutonic Knights: The Stone Castles of Latvia and Estonia, 1185-1560. Stephen Turnbull, Peter Dennis.

In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the prospect of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other major British towns and cities loomed large. Britain's aerial defenses were negligible, while German armed forces mustered a total of eleven airships.

The First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston S. Churchill, accepted responsibility for the defense of London, which translated to defense against Zeppelin attack. His resources were limited, but he believed that attack was the best means of defense. As such, the final four months of 1914 saw the Royal Navy Air Service (RNAS) launching four separate ground-breaking air attacks on Zeppelin bases in Germany, making these Britain's first ever strategic bombing raids: Düsseldorf/Cologne (September), Düsseldorf/Cologne again (October), Friedrichshafen (November) and Cuxhaven (December).

The raids achieved mixed results, but coming so early in the history of military aviation they all demonstrate evidence of great determination, ingenuity, improvisation and daring. The Düsseldorf raid culminated in the destruction of a Zeppelin, the Friedrichshafen raid involved tactics not dissimilar to those employed by the 'Dambusters' raid in 1943, as well as a spying mission into Germany by a flamboyant British entrepreneur, while the Cuxhaven raid saw the very first use of seaplanes in a combined sea/air operation.

This new addition to Osprey's RAID series provides continued coverage of Zeppelin history, but approaching it from a new angle. While the Zeppelin raids against London are a thing of World War 1 history, the British raids against Zeppelin bases have gone largely forgotten. Ian Castle seeks to redress this balance in this beautifully illustrated and detailed account of an important aspect of aerial warfare.


Whitescar
I had known that Germany used zeppelins to bomb England as early as January 1915, but I hadn't known that before then England had already attempted to bomb zeppelin bases in order to destroy the airships while they were on the ground and vulnerable.

Even by 1908, there was a great deal of worry about whether the zeppelins could be used against England in a war (one American newspaper had even called Count Zeppelin "the Bogie Man of England"). And with the naval arms race between Britain and Germany, most people feared that it was just a matter of time before Germany would unleash its fleet across the English Channel. Winston Churchill, then first lord of the admiralty, decided that the best way to deal with the zeppelin threat was to destroy the zeppelins before they could fly.

This book follows that theme and describes the series of raids against the zeppelin bases, describing the rationale, planning, choice of route, planes, and people involved in the attempts. The author does a good job of describing the raids, introducing the pilots and players behind the scenes, and giving some background. There are a few side stories, like the one about the officer who drove too fast and wrapped his car around a tree, which add human interest to what could have been an entirely dry book.

I like that there are maps and a lot of photographs, as well as artwork. My gripe with the maps is that they were often pages away from the text that referred to them, and I had to keep flipping back and forth to refer to them, which is why I gave the book only four stars. Otherwise, the maps are clear, although they could have been printed smaller and put on the page with the accompanying text and still been quite useful. What I really could have used would have been a map that showed the formation of the ships on the raids, as Castle's description got a bit bogged in places and I kind of lost track of who was were.

The photographs were really good additions to the text, and showed both men and equipment. I have copies of some primary source documents from the British National Archives, and I found photos of the people who authored them in this book, which really was a bonus for me. Now I have a face to go with the names. Anyway, some of the photographs really could have been larger, particularly the group shots, so that the men's individual features could be seen more clearly. But really, that's a nitpick and doesn't take away from the material.

Another reviewer mentions "30 pages," but my copy was a full 80 pages of text plus index. Of course, much of those 80 pages were occupied by maps, photos, and artwork, but there is still a good deal of reading. The book includes a bibliography. This is my first Osprey book, but I already have another two lined up: Castle's "British Airships 1905-30" and Charles Stephenson's "Zeppelins: German Airships 1900-40."
Adoranin
very in depth study. good read
Otrytrerl
This book is about an idylic crusade against foes(The German Zepplin Bases) hundreds of miles away
with a technology (WW1 Biplanes)that could only stay airborne minutes at a time.
For a short book no more than 30 pages ,it creates quickly that time of pondorous untouchable
air leviathans , cruising above your heads dropping bombs at will & the impotance of being able to
strike back at them.
A good read with intresting detail & rare photos.
The fact they achieved so much with so little..... er .. different war.

Chris D
Jothris
This book tells the story of a series of “strategic” raids on zeppelin sheds during the first world war. The term strategic has to emphasized as the aircraft used only flew a little over 100 miles to their targets. Also, each of the participating aircraft carried only between 2-4 bombs of about 20 pounds each. Even then quite a few of the bombs did not even go off. Many of the aircraft were so flimsy that they were destroyed in storms at their launching points. All and all an almost Charley Chaplinesque story. This is what makes the story all the more interesting though. The reader learns (and is amazed) at how primitive air technology was at the time. It was barely possible for aircraft of the time to be launched, make it to their targets (or even find them – in a few of the raids even this was not possible despite the fact that the sheds were about 700 feet in length), drop a few small bombs and make it back. Yet they did. Only one of the raids actually destroyed a shed and sheltered zeppelin but, considering the technology at the time this was still quite an accomplishment.

The book is very well researched. It not only makes use of secondary sources but also makes use of original archival sources. It is not just a synopsis of previously published works as so many Osprey publications are. Highly recommended.