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by Charles Whiting
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Europe
  • Author:
    Charles Whiting
  • ISBN:
    0850527740
  • ISBN13:
    978-0850527742
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pen and Sword; 1st edition (January 19, 2001)
  • Pages:
    234 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1840 kb
  • ePUB format
    1966 kb
  • DJVU format
    1716 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    711
  • Formats:
    doc lit lrf lrf


Unfortunately, this work on the notorious Gestapo Mueller, potentially a fascinating book, full of historical detection and intrigue, is largely a dud, a disappointment.

Unfortunately, this work on the notorious Gestapo Mueller, potentially a fascinating book, full of historical detection and intrigue, is largely a dud, a disappointment.

His first novel was written while still an undergraduate, was published in 1954 and by 1958 had been followed by three wartime thrillers.

ISBN 10: 0850527740 ISBN 13: 9780850527742. ISBN 10: 0850527740 ISBN 13: 9780850527742.

Charles Whiting (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

About Charles Whiting

About Charles Whiting. His first novel was written while still an undergraduate, was published in 1954 and by 1958 had been followed by three wartime thrillers.

Any type of book or journal citing Charles Whiting as a writer. 4. Decision at St Vith Charles Whiting.

Kostov, and Duncan Stirling. Born in the Bootham area of York, England, Whiting was the son of a fitter

Clearly, what has happened is that the use of the word Gestapo has clouded my message.

Clearly, what has happened is that the use of the word Gestapo has clouded my message. Yeah, that'll happen. Try "Schutzstaffel" next time. The gomers who voted for you will think you're talking about sausage. Charles P. Pierce Charles P Pierce is the author of four books, most recently Idiot America, and has been a working journalist since 1976. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below. More From Politics With Charles P. Pierce. Trump May Have Fully Poisoned the Republican Brand. The DNI Was in a Nutcracker.

A World War II veteran and dedicated researcher traces the career of Gestapo chief Heinrich Muller and exposes the Cold War cover-up by both East and West as to his later whereabouts and activities.See:

Thordigda
This was a very good book, but it had an unusual orientation and jumped forward and backward through time periods. It covered the basics on the state of the information known about Muller. However, it apparently ignored some things I have read in other places. It did not really deal with the controversial "Muller Journals" by Gregory Douglas. I am interested in Muller for his role in the US National Security State and possibly the JFK Assassination. In case people don't know it, JFK was murdered by renegade former Nazis, among other people.

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Skrimpak
This is a book about the life and presumed fate of Heinrich Muller (also referred to as Gestapo Muller). For those who don't know who Muller was, he was the head of the German Gestapo (Geheime Statspolizei) during WWII and disappeared without a trace near the end of the war. It has been presumed that he died in Berlin or elsewhere in Germany during the last days of the war. It is also possible that he escaped, either with help from the Americans or Russians, to play a key role in counter-intelligence at the beginning of the Cold War (there were also apparently rumors that he was seen living in New Hampshire!). As head of the Gestapo, he played a key role in the implementation of the Final Solution and in eliminating political opponents of the Nazi regime, and is the only major Nazi war criminal whose ultimate fate is unknown. The names of Goring, Himmler, Rosenberg, Kaltenbrunner, and Heydrich are well known to even the most casual students of WWII, but Muller's role in the events of WWII is virtually unknown, and he certainly had a more significant role than most of the other defendants at Nurenburg. This is really the stuff of legend: the head of the Gestapo, one of the most infamous, brutal police forces in history, is virtually unknown outside of Germany and disappears without a trace. What happened to him? Did he die in Berlin, or did he elude justice in a more dramatic fashion? A novel with such a plot would not be believable, and this is history! Whiting tries to present answers to these questions in his book. There is actually surprisingly little known about Muller (his youth, his role in the Nazi regime, and his fate), and a well written, well researched biography could have been infinitely fascinating. Unfortunately, this book is neither well written nor well researched. Whiting decided to write a book filled with unsupported inuendo, hearsay, and speculation. The reader can draw no definitive (or even speculative) conclusion about the life and fate of Muller after reading this book. It is poorly organized, documentation and footnotes (or endnotes) are non-existant: it is virtually impossible to know if this is history or historical fiction. I can only characterize this book as REALLY disappointing. Unfortunately, there is no alternative to this book that I know of, and if you really want to know something about Muller, this is about all there is. Not recommended unless you absolutely must read something (no matter how poor) about Muller.
Rleillin
Charles Whiting is a popular British historian who has a score of decent to good books to his credit. Unfortunately, this work on the notorious Gestapo Mueller, potentially a fascinating book, full of historical detection and intrigue, is largely a dud, a disappointment.

The book is poorly written, and apparently unedited. Dates are wrong (Lidice), birthdays wrong (Hitler was 55, not 65, when he died), names are misspelled, and many, many factually highly questionable assertions are boldly put forth without any kind of documentation or footnotes (occasionally a reference to a personal conversation with someone now dead). Heydrich took time out of his busy persecution of a continent to fly combat missions deep in Russia? Come on.

Whiting spends no time on the founding and development of the Gestapo under Goering, the wrangling with control over this tool of terror between Goering and Himmler, the actual duties and execution of those duties by the Gestapo, nothing. This kind of information would be important, and is best read about in Heinz Hoehne's book on the SS. The reviews of the Roehm Putsch, the Venlo Incident, and other prominent episodes are all better covered elsewhere. There is some background, very lightly gone over, of the various major figures in the story, although even they have not been thoroughly fact-checked; Himmler's alleged crack to Pohl on Heydrich's death makes no sense, Heydrich's alleged Jewish background is trotted out again although thoroughly debunked in every serious book on the subject, etc. Of all the weakly drawn characters, that of Muller is most sketchily presented, with more than a bit of speculation, repeated charges of unproven and highly unlikely treasonable activity as regards going over to the Russians, and not a shred of evidence indicating anything after May 2, 1945. Although the book is supposedly on the search for this man after the end of the war, there is no reason whatever to suggest he survived its last days; the lack of his actual body, in a city where tens and tens of thousands died in the last week of the war, is indicative of chaos, not escape.

The book reads as though it were dictated, late at night, and never reread. One reads over phrases like "the Second World War Two" all too often. There are no footnotes or references, several of the photos are actually of the author and not the book's subject, and so on. I did like the crack about the US Freedom of Information Act, though.

Muller was a figure very much in the background, though of great importance and power. While it seems most likely that he did, indeed, die in the first days of May 1945 somewhere in Berlin, there is plenty of room for speculation in other directions. His story would make an absorbing book...but this isn't the one.
avanger
I enjoyed two of Whiting's previous books, but this one was hard to follow. One of the previous reviewers stated this work was rambling. I have to agree. The flow in this book from chapter to chapter was terrible. The author would review one section about the Red Orchestra, then in the next chapter review some aspect of Roehm, Boring, Nebe's life. One had a hard time with what the author was trying to prove. Intermingled in this writing was slugs of information about Gestapo Muller. It almost appeared that the author had a hard time finding enough material about Muller, so anything related to him was thrown into the book.

This could have been a good book if the author had focused on the subject. Rather he threw everything in, including the kitchen sink. I did learn something about Gestapo Muller, so that is why I rated this two stars. Otherwise this was a poor read.