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by Jefferson Chase,Rudolph Herzog
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Europe
  • Author:
    Jefferson Chase,Rudolph Herzog
  • ISBN:
    1935554301
  • ISBN13:
    978-1935554301
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Melville House; 1st edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1753 kb
  • ePUB format
    1935 kb
  • DJVU format
    1158 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    447
  • Formats:
    mbr lit azw lrf


In Nazi Germany, telling jokes about Hitler could get you killed Hitler and Göring are standing on top of the Berlin . Dead Funny isn’t just a book of wildly off-limits humor

In Nazi Germany, telling jokes about Hitler could get you killed Hitler and Göring are standing on top of the Berlin radio tower. Hitler says he wants to do something to put a smile on the Berliners’ faces. Dead Funny isn’t just a book of wildly off-limits humor. Rather, it’s a fascinating, heartbreaking look at power dynamics, propaganda, and the human hunger for catharsis. The Atlantic, Best Books of 2012.

Dead funny: humor in Hitler’s Germany, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase

Dead funny: humor in Hitler’s Germany, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase. p. cm. Originally published in German as Heil Hitler, das Schwein ist tot! : Lachen unter Hitler : Komik und Humor im Dritten Reic. ichborn Verlag, c200. rankfurt am Main, Germany –T. This book is intended as a journey back to what is thought of as a humorless age, not to make readers laugh but to give them a new perspective on the most terrible era of German history. It does not ignore the moral debates of the postwar period, but it does not focus upon them, either.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

In Nazi Germany, telling jokes about Hitler could get you killed  . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler's Germany as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Nazi Germany, telling jokes about Hitler could get you killed. Is it permissible to laugh at Hitler? This is a question that is often debated in Germany today, where, in light of the dimension of the horrors committed in the name of its citizens, many people have difficulty taking a satiric look at the Third Reich. And whenever some do, accusations arise that they are downplaying or trivializing the Holocaust. In this groundbreaking volume, Rudolph Herzog shows that the image of the ridiculous Führer was by no means a post-war invention: In the early years of Nazi rule many Germans poked fun at Hitler and other high officials.

Humor in Hitler's Germany. Translated by Jefferson Chase

Humor in Hitler's Germany. Translated by Jefferson Chase. from The Atlantic’s Best Books of 2012. Recent Related Posts.

Yet jokes were not simply abolished in the Third Reich, as Rudolph Herzog, son of the film-maker Werner, makes clear in this . Stripped of historical context, few of the gags in this book are actually funny, the author concedes. But he never lets mild satire pass as heroic opposition.

Yet jokes were not simply abolished in the Third Reich, as Rudolph Herzog, son of the film-maker Werner, makes clear in this concise, compelling book. Although some died for their quips, their fates had already been decided from above. The actor and indiscreet raconteur Robert Dorsay, already hounded from employment, made one last splash as lurid posters announced his judicial murder.

Jefferson Chase is one of the foremost translators of German history.

As a director, Rudolph Herzog is best known for the reality crime series The Heist, a collaboration with David Glover, which aired on Channel 4 (. and was called "riveting" by The Daily Telegraph. Jefferson Chase is one of the foremost translators of German history. He has translated Wolfgang Scivelbusch, Thomas Mann and Gotz Aly, among many others.

Rudolph Herzog is a historian and filmmaker. The son of celebrated director Werner Herzog, he lives in Berlin. He has translated Wolfgang Scivelbusch, Thomas Mann and Götz Aly, among many others.

THE NAZI SEIZURE OF POWER WHEN THE NAZIS came to power in 1933, they had already passed the zenith of their popularity

THE NAZI SEIZURE OF POWER WHEN THE NAZIS came to power in 1933, they had already passed the zenith of their popularity.

Rudolph Herzog's powerful book tackles the bleak subject of humour in Nazi Germany

Rudolph Herzog's powerful book tackles the bleak subject of humour in Nazi Germany. This complex, often evasive topic inevitably offers few laughs but provides much to think about. This is a formidable obstacle for Rudolph Herzog (son of the famous filmmaker) in his slim and powerful book Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler's Germany, a 2006 work now translated into English by Jefferson Chase.

In Nazi Germany, telling jokes about Hitler could get you killed. Is it permissible to laugh at Hitler? This is a question that is often debated in Germany today, where, in light of the dimension of the horrors committed in the name of its citizens, many people have difficulty taking a satiric look at the Third Reich. And whenever some do, accusations arise that they are downplaying or trivializing the Holocaust. But there is a long history of jokes about the Nazis. In this groundbreaking volume, Rudolph Herzog shows that the image of the “ridiculous Führer” was by no means a post-war invention: In the early years of Nazi rule many Germans poked fun at Hitler and other high officials. It’s a fascinating and frightening history: from the suppression of the anti-Nazi cabaret scene of the 1930s, to jokes about Hitler and the Nazis told during WWII, to the collections of “whispered jokes” that were published in the immediate aftermath of the war, to the horrific accounts of Germans who were imprisoned and executed for telling jokes about Hitler and other Nazis. Significantly, the jokes collected here also show that not all Germans were hypnotized by Nazi propaganda—or unaware of Hitler’s concentration camps, which were also the subject of jokes during the war. In collecting these quips, Herzog pushes back against the argument, advanced in aftermath of World War II, that people were unaware of Hitler’s demonic maneuvering. The truth, Herzog writes, is more troubling: Germans knew much about the actions of their government, joked about it occasionally . . . and failed to act.

Modifyn
Very insightful as to the thinking of many Germans during the NAZI era. It reveals aspects of German culture and the people's attitudes much differently than most material one finds. I did laugh out loud on many occasions. For those who have traveled through former British colonies, the joke about Moses and his staff is hilarious. So, surprisingly, were the antics of some cabaret entertainers who found themselves in a concentration camp, of all places. However, I don't know if I believe that Goebbels condoned or enjoyed their shows; his was probably a lure to trap those who opposed Nazi rule. There is also much historical detail about the fate of many professional comedians and everyday people whose sense of humor was condemned by their paranoid and brutal rulers. This part of everyday life under Nazi tyranny should make us realize how fortunate we are to live in modern Western countries whose governments are above criminalizing (most) dissent. It should also make us doubly aware that many people in the world today do not have this luxury. A book definitely worth reading.
Kanrad
good price
Mora
I had never thought humor could be used by anyone during Hitler's rule. To read how humor was used to get through these times and the consequences for doing so was unsettelling to say the least. There were also other bits of information that were new to me. Very interesting reading.
Breder
We learn so much by finding out what was funny in Hitler's Europe and how it was given and received by the Nazis and by the Jewish population. We learn the many forms of resistance.
Hanelynai
This is a very good look into the way that people deal with living in a totalitarian state with humor and how the state reacts.
Walianirv
Insightful about how Germans coped in Nazi Germany, and provides details I had not found in any other source, and I've read quite a bit on the subject.
CONVERSE
This might have been a fascinating read. It wasn't. It's repetitive and superficial, better luck next time.
German humor is to humor what military music is to music