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by David Hume
Download The History of England Volume III (History of England, The) fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    David Hume
  • ISBN:
    0865970297
  • ISBN13:
    978-0865970298
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Liberty Fund, Inc. (August 1, 1984)
  • Pages:
    494 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
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    1750 kb
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    4.4
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    866
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The History of England (1754–61) is David Hume's great work on the history of England, which he wrote in instalments while he was librarian to the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh.

The History of England (1754–61) is David Hume's great work on the history of England, which he wrote in instalments while he was librarian to the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh. It was published in six volumes in 1754, 1756, 1759, and 1761. The first publication of his History was greeted with outrage by all political factions, but it became a best-seller, finally giving him the financial independence he had long sought

Volume 3 of Hume’s great History of England the theme of which is liberty, above all English constitutional development from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Revolution of 1688.

Volume 3 of Hume’s great History of England the theme of which is liberty, above all English constitutional development from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Revolution of 1688.

The history of england. from the Invasion ofJulius Caesar to The Revolution in z688. Hume, David, 1711-1776. The history of England. Based on the ediuon of a778, wath the author's last corrections and im-. provements ".

Title: The History of England in Three Volumes, Vo. Part B. From Henry III. to Richard III. Author: David Hume. Release Date: September 8, 2006 Last Updated: September 1, 2016. From the invasion of julius cæsar. To the end of the reign of james the second, By david hume, esq. 1688.

David Hume is one of the great philosophers of the Western intellectual tradition. His philosophical writings earned him lasting fame and renown; his historical writing earned his bread and butter. His "The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688", published between 1754 and 1764, was immensely popular and Hume wrote that "the copy-money given me by the booksellers much exceeded any thing formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, but opulent.

Start by marking The History of England, Volume I as Want to Read . David Hume-of course-is not identical to Edward Gibbon.

Start by marking The History of England, Volume I as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It put English and French history into perspective for me, and the chapters on Thomas of Becket and Henry II completely transformed the way I looked at that period. 1150 to 1250 in England is one of the most important places and times that ever were, and I wonder why.

Volume III examines the early Tudor period, from Henry VII through Edward VI, Lady Jane Grey, and Mary I, with an appendix discussng toleration. Books related to The History of England Volume III. Skip this list. The tudors: life of henry VIII. Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth. Format: Global Grey free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook Pages (PDF): 2,735 Publication Date: 1754-1762. These books can take me from 2 to 10 hours to create. I want to keep them free, but need some support to be able to do so. If you can, please make a small donation (the average is £. 0).

James I of England and James VI of Scotland (John de Critz the Elder, Mary Evans Picture Library). For three or four days he rested in Hertfordshire at Robert Cecil’s country home, Theobalds House, at which seat he took pleasure in creating many knights

James I of England and James VI of Scotland (John de Critz the Elder, Mary Evans Picture Library). 2. Anne of Denmark, James’s spouse (. 605–10, Gheeraerts, Marcus (. 561–1635) (attr. to)), Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, UK, Bridgeman Images). 3. James in front of his lords, temporal and spiritual (Mary Evans Picture Library, Everett Collection). For three or four days he rested in Hertfordshire at Robert Cecil’s country home, Theobalds House, at which seat he took pleasure in creating many knights. He was so generous with titles that he was accused of improvidence.

Volume III examines the early Tudor period, from Henry VII through Edward VI, Lady Jane Grey, and Mary I, with an appendix discussng toleration.

digytal soul
Very well wriiten and concise work from an excellent historian
Gholbimand
The History of England is philosopher and writer David Hume's great work on England's history from the invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688, written while he was serving as librarian to what became the National Library of Scotland. It was published in six volumes in 1754, 1756, 1759, and 1761. This third volume covers the period from Henry VII in 1485 to the death of Mary I ["Bloody Mary"] in 1558. The previous volume was The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688: Volume II, and the next volume is The History of England: Volume IV (History of England, The).

During the times of James III, Hume suggests that "The kingdom of Scotland had not yet attained that state, which distinguishes a civilized monarchy, and which enables the government, by the force of its law and institutions alone, without the extraordinary capacity in the sovereign, to maintain itself in order and tranquility." (Pg. 24) Of the 1492 war with France, he comments, "The nobility were universally seized with a desire of military glory; and having credulously swallowed all the boasts of the king, they dreamed of no less than carrying their triumphant banners to the gates of Paris..." (Pg. 39)

Of Henry VIII's reign, he observes, "There has scarcely been any period, when the balance of power was better secured in Europe, and seemed more able to maintain itself without any anxious concern or attention of the princes... England was united in domestic peace, and by its situation happily secured from the invasion of foreigners." (Pg. 88)

He asserts about Martin Luther: "a man naturally inflexible, vehement, opinionative, was become incapable... to relinquish a sect... which brought him ... the glory of dictating the religious faith and principles of multitudes." (Pg. 139) He adds that "It is not probable, that the pope, had he conducted himself with ever so great moderation and temper, could hope, during the life-time of Henry [VIII], to have regained much authority or influence in England. That monarch was of a temper both impetuous and obstinate; and having proceeded so far in throwing off the papal yoke, he could never again have been brought tamely to bend his neck to it." (Pg. 203) He observes, "Thus the authority of the popes... was ruined by the excess of its acquisitions... Indulgences had in former ages tended extremely to enrich the holy see; but being openly abused, they served to excite the first commotions and opposition in Germany... meeting with an unlucky concurrence of circumstances, was now the cause, why England separated herself from the Romish communion." (Pg. 206)

He notes that "The fall of [Oliver] Cromwel was hastened by other causes... The people were averse to him, as the supposed author of the violence on the monasteries: establishments, which were still revered and beloved by the commonality. The catholics regarded him as the concealed enemy of their religion. The protestants... reproached him with the timidity, if not treachery, of his conduct. And the king... was not displeased to throw on Cromwel the load of public hatred... to regain the affections of his subjects." (Pg. 275)

He argues, "The practice of persecution... is the scandal of all religion; and the theological animosity... far from being an argument of men's conviction in their opposite sects, is a certain proof, that they have never reached any serious persuasion with regard to these remote and sublime subjects... they are shaken in their imagined faith, by the opposite persuasion, or even doubts of other men, and vent on their antagonists that impatience, which is the natural result of so disagreeable a state of the understanding." (Pg. 431-432)

While Hume's scholarship has since been superseded, his lively writing style makes this a series well worth reading.
Efmprof
Hume describes, as usual, in pithy and concise English, the events from Bosworth Field, in 1485, which led directly to the coronation of Henry VII, to the coronation of Henry VIII, who is the central figure in this volume, which might arguably serve as Henry's biography.
In this period, we learn how Henry VII formed close alliances with Ferdinand of Aragon, the wealthy prince of Spain, whose daughter, the Infanta Catherine, at 18 years of age, was first betrothed to the future king's elder brother Arthur (16 years old); but when Arthur dies, Henry, not wishing to return the dowry of 200,000 ducats, dumps Catherine onto his younger son, the future Henry VIII (who is 12 at this time). This fact alone might have caused much of the resentment toward the queen, whom Henry later divorced.
These incidents, the "divorce" of the monarch, the break with Rome, the tightrope walked by Henry between catholicism and the Lutheran principles, the growing power and wealth of Spain, the rivalries and jealousies between that nation and England and France; the growth and spread of protestant reform; Henry's absolute control over the government, his arbitrary and ruthless rule over the people, who esteemed him highly; his death, and the accession of Edward VI, and later, Mary, who reversed the policies of her father, and married Philip II of Spain, a catholic monarch; and Mary's death, and the succession of Elizabeth, close the volume.
As this volume becomes more particular than its predecessors, and covers a period of little more than 70 years, its detail somewhat hampers the flow of events, whereas the first two volumes were more general.
Still, an excellent work of history, and a very good read.