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by Marie Roland De LA Platiere
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Europe
  • Author:
    Marie Roland De LA Platiere
  • ISBN:
    0404568297
  • ISBN13:
    978-0404568290
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ams Pr Inc (June 1, 1976)
  • Pages:
    381 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1837 kb
  • ePUB format
    1680 kb
  • DJVU format
    1344 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    309
  • Formats:
    lrf azw azw docx


Marie-Jeanne 'Manon' Roland de la Platière (Paris, March 17, 1754 – Paris, November 8, 1793), born Marie-Jeanne Phlipon, and best known under the name Madame Roland, was a French revolutionary, salonnière and writer

Marie-Jeanne 'Manon' Roland de la Platière (Paris, March 17, 1754 – Paris, November 8, 1793), born Marie-Jeanne Phlipon, and best known under the name Madame Roland, was a French revolutionary, salonnière and writer. Initially she led a quiet and unremarkable life as a provincial intellectual with her husband, the economist Jean-Marie Roland de la Platière. She became interested in politics only when the French Revolution broke out in 1789.

Jean-Marie Roland de la Platière (18 February 1734 – 10 November 1793) was a French inspector of manufactures in Lyon and became a leader of the Girondist faction in the French Revolution.

Jean-Marie Roland de la Platière (18 February 1734 – 10 November 1793) was a French inspector of manufactures in Lyon and became a leader of the Girondist faction in the French Revolution, largely influenced in this direction by his wife, Marie-Jeanne "Manon" Roland de la Platière. He served as a minister of the interior in King Louis XVI's government in 1792.

Mémoires de Madame Roland. Madame Roland fut en effet emprisonnée et finalement exécutée sous la Terreur

Mémoires de Madame Roland. Madame Roland fut en effet emprisonnée et finalement exécutée sous la Terreur. Les sujets abordés Cet ouvrage contient la collation de plusieurs mémoires rédigés par Madame Roland, une parisienne de la fin du XVIIIè siècle, mariée un ministre de l'intérieur lors de la fin de la royauté, et personnage actif de la Révolution Française.

I just enjoyed every word of rhis memoir, she was a very brave women, I recomend to anyone to read.

The Private Memoirs of Madame Roland. Chicago, Illinois: A. C. McClurg and C. 1900. Roland de la Platière - (spr. lāng d la platjǟr ), Jean Marie, franz. Staatsmann, geb. 18. Febr. Roland de la Platière, Jean Marie and Marie". The American Cyclopædia. French Women’s Revolutionary Writings: Madame Roland or the Pleasure of the Mask, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, Vol. 15, No. 1, Spring 1996. Tarbell, Ida M. Madame Roland: A Biographical Study, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1896. Taylor, I. A. Life of Madame Roland, Hutchinson & C. 1911. Walker, Lesley H. Sweet and Consoling Virtue: The Memoirs of Madame Roland, Eighteenth-Century Studies 34(3), 2001.

Marie-Jeanne Roland de la Platière (March 17, 1754 – November 8, 1793), born Marie-Jeanne Phlipon, more famous simply as Madame Roland, was, together with her husband Jean-Marie Roland de la Platière.

Marie-Jeanne Roland de la Platière (March 17, 1754 – November 8, 1793), born Marie-Jeanne Phlipon, more famous simply as Madame Roland, was, together with her husband Jean-Marie Roland de la Platière, a supporter of the French Revolution. She was an influential member of the Girondist faction which fell out of favor during the Reign of Terror and died on the guillotine. O Liberté, que de crimes on commet en ton nom! O Liberty, how many crimes are committed in thy name!

Because Madame Roland felt that women should be excluded from politics and expressed strong ambivalence about female authorship, it has proven difficult to enshrine her in the contemporary pantheon of eighteenth-century women writers.

Because Madame Roland felt that women should be excluded from politics and expressed strong ambivalence about female authorship, it has proven difficult to enshrine her in the contemporary pantheon of eighteenth-century women writers. Sara E. Melzer and Leslie Rabine's omission of Madame Roland from their volume, Rebel Daughters: Women and the French Revolution (1992), is symptomatic of this difficulty. For many critics, Madame Roland was not enough of a rebel. Excess - either too much writing or too much virtue - would seem to be at the root of the anxiety expressed about Madame Roland's Mémoires.