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by David Boyle
Download The Troubadour's Song: The Capture and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    David Boyle
  • ISBN:
    0802714595
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802714596
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Walker and Company (December 31, 2005)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1385 kb
  • ePUB format
    1272 kb
  • DJVU format
    1110 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    219
  • Formats:
    docx mobi doc azw


The Troubadour's Song book. If you read one book about Richard the Lionheart, read this one. I learned so much.

The Troubadour's Song book. On his long journey home from the Third Crusade, Richard the. All of it was very readable, very compelling, and with Boyle only to happy to incorporate and explore the myths, it's very approachable. LOVE LOVE LOVE THIS BOOK. Aug 12, 2019 Alan added it. Shelves: epub.

The Capture, Imprisonment and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart. No part of this book may be reproduced or. transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or. mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any. information storage and retrieval system, without permission. in writing from the Publisher. First published in the United States of America in 2005 by. Walker Publishing Company, Inc. Originally published in.

Author David Boyle explores both medieval legend and fact in his book, The Troubadour?s Song: The Capture and . In this, Boyle starts with the legend of King Richard?s imprisonment and how he may have been discovered by a troubadour, by the name of Blondel

Author David Boyle explores both medieval legend and fact in his book, The Troubadour?s Song: The Capture and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart. I must say, it?s one of the best works of popular fiction that I have come across this year. In this, Boyle starts with the legend of King Richard?s imprisonment and how he may have been discovered by a troubadour, by the name of Blondel. Beginning with the historical legend, he moves on to discussing the culture and rise of the troubadour culture, and how the Courts of Love helped to shape a rise in music, and the idea of codified rule of behavior between men and women.

Originally published: Blondel's song. London ; New York : Viking, 2005. Includes bibliographical references (pages 343-351) and index. The legend of Blondel - The courts of love - The Age of Light - Paris and Jerusalem - Acre - Setting sail - Disguise - Blondel's song - Prison - A king's ransom - The return of the King - The very last day of chivalry - The. Legend of Blondel, reprise - Appendix. Richard's prison song : written in captivity, Summer 1193.

Originally published in Great Britain in 2005 by Penguin as "Blondel's Song: The Capture, Imprisonment and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart".

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Originally published in Great Britain in 2005 by Penguin as "Blondel's Song: The Capture, Imprisonment and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart". On his way back from the Third Crusade in 1192, Richard the Lionheart, one of England's most famous and romantic kings, was shipwrecked and stranded near Venice.

David Boyle recreates the drama of the Third Crusade and the dynamic power politics and personalities of the late 12th century in Europe, as. .An evocation of a pivotal era, The Troubadour's Song is narrative history at its finest.

David Boyle recreates the drama of the Third Crusade and the dynamic power politics and personalities of the late 12th century in Europe, as well as the growing fascination with romance and chivalry embodied in the troubadour culture. Download from free file storage. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/The Troubadour's Song: The Capture and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart.

David Courtney Boyle, born 1958, is a British author and journalist who writes mainly about history and new ideas in economics, money . The Troubadour's Song: The Capture and Ransom of Richard the Lionheart, 2005.

David Courtney Boyle, born 1958, is a British author and journalist who writes mainly about history and new ideas in economics, money, business, and culture. He lives in Steyning in West Sussex. He is co-founder and policy director of Radix, which he characterized in 2017 as a radical centrist think tank. He is also co-director of the mutual think tank New Weather Institute.

The extraordinary events surrounding Richard the Lionheart s.

The extraordinary events surrounding Richard the Lionheart s disappearance provides the background to some of the most colourful and enduring legends Robin Hood, the Sheriff of Nottingham, the discovery of King Arthur s grave, and above all, the story of Blondel, Richard s faithful minstrel, and his journey across central Europe singing under castle towers until he finds the missing king.

This book by David Boyle proves to be a superb work of history regarding the capture and ransom of King Richard I of England

This book by David Boyle proves to be a superb work of history regarding the capture and ransom of King Richard I of England. Although it read like Richard's biography, the book gives a good detail study of this incident.

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On his long journey home from the Third Crusade, Richard the Lionheart--one of history's most powerful and romantic figures--was ship-wrecked near Venice in the Adriatic Sea. Forced to make his way home by land through enemy countries, he traveled in disguise, but was eventually captured by Duke Leopold V of Austria, who in turn conveyed him to Henry VI, the Holy Roman Emperor. Henry demanded a majestic ransom, and Richard's mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine, raised the historic sum--one quarter of the entire wealth of England--and Richard was returned. But a peculiar legend followed him--that a troubadour named Blondel, a friend of Richard's, had journeyed across Europe singing a song he knew Richard would recognize in order to discover his secret place of imprisonment.

David Boyle recreates the drama of the Third Crusade and the dynamic power politics and personalities of the late 12th century in Europe, as well as the growing fascination with romance and chivalry embodied in the troubadour culture. An evocation of a pivotal era, The Troubadour's Song is narrative history at its finest.


Akisame
When you get to the last few pages of chapter one of the Kindle edition, you suddenly get dumped back to a spot about halfway through the chapter. I tried skipping to chapter two, and as I approached the end of chapter two, I was dumped back to a spot about halfway through that chapter, as well. I'm going to try one more time, reading chapter three. Just to satisfy my curiosity, since obviously, the whole experience of reading the book has been totally messed up. I did notice that there are many spots in this Kindle edition where two words are run together, commas are misplaced, etc. Maybe the book was made into a Kindle edition, and never proof-read or double checked to make sure it was done properly. As it exists at this time, the Kindle edition of "The Troubadour's Song" is useless.
Virn
This is a good book but do not mistake it for a novel. It is non fiction but good writing to keep it entertaining. Boyle presents an unbiased history, until you reach the last chapter. But that is his own opinion and he freely admits that. It is also why I say it is written by an Englishman, because in spite of his honesty on Richard, he still admires him as great leader. In truth, even after I completed it, I still see him as one of England's worse King's and a large force behind troubles which plagued Europe for years. The man was brutal, treacherous and hated by many. He was almost a patricide and he had to be at least a little off base sexually for the only connection to him of having sex with women involve rape, there is never any sign of him even attempting to bed his wife and their are to many close associations with men. Boyle even admits that Richard's actions led to his being taken prisoner yet he sees Ricahrd as the victim. His image was loved but I still could find few redeeming qualities in the man himself. I do not consider a man who likes poetry and song, redeeming. It seemed to me he set in motion a great many disasters including the loss of his father's empire, and much of it from greed. King John was no more evil than the brother he followed, Richard just died in time to save himself from bearing the burden of his failures. In fact I see King John as the true hero of England for he lost most of the continental holdings, allowing England to have its own idenity, and one I still admire. The French do it with Napoleon, the Russians with Lenin and the Americans with Kennedy. Dying made them great but each of them created lasting problems. I thank Boyle for being honest with the facts even if we could not come to the same conclusions. Some things seem to be conflict on other facts I have read on Richard but as he states, it is hard to fill every gap of in such distant history. One of the better non fiction books out there.
Helldor
Beautiful book. Excellent condition.
Barit
Great book
Arith
I give this book 4 stars because it is an enjoyable, easy read. But it doesn't get very deep into anything. I am not sure why "the troubadour's song" got prime billing on the title. It isn't much of the book. There isn't much historical evidence concerning Blondel and anything he might have done concerning locating King Richard or his release. The author's discussion is interesting but only a very small part of the book. The author pulled together the whole story of Richard, his capture, the other major participants in the story, England's raising of the ransom, and even, the economic effect on England. All well told. But nothing particularly astounding or revealing. However, the author writes very well. The story moves along nicely and you have a pleasant time reading it. If you are only vaguely familiar with King Richard's capture and ransom and that sort of story would be interesting to you, this is a good book to relax with and enjoy. A final aspect of this book I really enjoyed was at the end when he tells you what happened to all the major participants after Richard is released.
kolos
This book is one of those that is all too rarely found - the history is well-researched and very detailed and yet the style is smooth and engaging, making it both informative and a pleasure to read at the same time. The keenness of Boyle's interest in both the period - the late 12th century with its crusades, chivalry, courtly love and troubadours - and in the core event itself - the capture and ransom of Richard the Lionheart - comes through in the way in which he brings it all to life, immersing the reader to the extent that we feel we are there as witnesses.

One thing I felt Boyle did particularly well was pointing out where he was relating known historical fact and where he was filling in gaps with informed speculation, showing the various possibilities and why he felt a particular one might be the most likely. For example, very little is actually known about Blondel, the legendary troubadour of the title, but Boyle shows what is known and also what can be deduced or speculated based on it. He also does the same for Robin Hood, another legendary figure tied to the story of Richard's absence and return to England.

Another thing Boyle does well is giving the reader a sense of the personalities of the dominant figures of the period and its events, and showing how much the strengths and weakness of their personalities affected how things turned out. Richard's charisma, persuasiveness and calm in the face of adversity come out vividly in the parts where he is a prisoner of Henry VI, the Holy Roman Emperor, and put on trial for alleged crimes connected to his conduct of the crusade. By sheer presence and oratory, Richard wins over the German princes summoned to be his judges, not only winning his acquittal but also going on to form new alliances and trade deals for England, all while still a prisoner. His playful and winning nature comes out in how he dealt with his guards. Richard's reputation as a fearsome warrior was such that when he was captured, orders were given that he be guarded by four knights with swords drawn at all times. But within a matter of weeks, Richard so charmed his guards that he was constantly getting them drunk and engaging them in wrestling contests. At the same time, Boyle shows how Richard's ego and his inability to resist grand gestures were ultimately responsible for his being noticed and captured. It's rather difficult to travel incognito disguised as a merchant while at the same time insisting on giving expensive jeweled rings to local nobles and granting kingly bequests to build or restore cathedrals.

Other personalities are also brought out in vivid detail. Eleanor of Acquitaine, Richard's mother, in her 70's at the time but still a lioness in her own right, taking charge of the raising of the ransom and of the negotiations to free her son. The vacillating Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI, never truly certain of what he should do with his valuable but equally dangerous prisoner. Leopold of Austria, whose personal bitterness against Richard over his treatment at the siege of Acre led to his imprisoning of Richard when was forced by fate to attempt to cross through his lands on his return to England. And Philip Augustus, the King of France, a close friend in Richard's youth only to become his enemy in adulthood.

The book is rich in anecdotes relating to the events. Among my favorite was when Longchamp, Richard's unpopular Chancellor in England, tries to flee the country disguised as a woman only to be caught at the port when a flirtatious fisherman starts feeling him up. Another was when Richard, finally released from captivity, sends a written message to his treacherous brother John, warning him "Look to yourself. The devil is loosed!" The book also goes into interesting side details, such as the difference between troubadours and minstrels (troubadours wrote songs, whereas minstrels only sang them), the limited methods of writing down music at the time (they had a way of recording the where the notes were on a scale but not the tempo of how they should be played or how long they should be held), the way in which the ransom, almost a quarter of England's wealth converted into silver, was raised and the magnitude of its effect on the economies of both England and Europe, and the fates of all of the major figures in the period after Richard's release (almost all of them were dead in less than five years).

All in all, I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys either history or a good read. It more than meets the mark in both.