» » The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles, 350-650

Download The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles, 350-650 fb2

by John. Morris
Download The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles, 350-650 fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    John. Morris
  • ISBN:
    0297813757
  • ISBN13:
    978-0297813750
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    WEIDENFELD NICHOLSON HISTORY; New Ed edition (1993)
  • Pages:
    688 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1874 kb
  • ePUB format
    1150 kb
  • DJVU format
    1478 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    905
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf mbr mobi


If John Morris never wrote another book, his AGE OF ARTHUR would have to be described as a lifetime achievement. He also makes a convincing case that history is not predestined. THE AGE OF ARTHUR covers a period that has been condescendingly labeled the "dark ages" by some.

If John Morris never wrote another book, his AGE OF ARTHUR would have to be described as a lifetime achievement. I bought this book because I've been fascinated with King Arthur for some time, and this book is THE history of the period before, during and after Arthur. Or was at the time he published his book. Many new "early Medieval studies" were published in the 1990s).

The Age of Arthur book. John Morris' heroic attempt to reconstruct in detail the history of the British Isles and Brittany in the centuries following the collapse of Roman rule was based on his analysis of all the extant evidence. But it has taken me over 40 years finally to read this tome from cover to cover and I now realise why.

In depth look at the history behind the myth of Arthur, though mostly focusing on the 'age' of the mythical king, and not the origins of the myth itself.

Documents major events and figures that fashioned British politics, culture, and foreign relations between the mid-fourth and seventh centuries. In depth look at the history behind the myth of Arthur, though mostly focusing on the 'age' of the mythical king, and not the origins of the myth itself.

MORRIS J. Published by Phillimore, Chichester (1977). LCCN:72-11121 ; ISBN:068413313X ; xviii, 665 pp. ; black cloth in pictorial dustjacket ; Contents: Roman Britain - Britain in 350 - The ending of the western empire - Independent Britain : the evidence - Independent Britain: Vortigern - The overthrow of Britain - The Empire of Arthur - The War.

John Robert Morris (8 June 1913 – 1 June 1977) was an English historian who specialised in the study of the institutions of the Roman Empire and the history of Sub-Roman Britain. He is best known for his book The Age of Arthur (1973), which attempted to reconstruct the history of Britain and Ireland during the so-called "Dark Ages" (350–650 . following the Roman withdrawal, based on scattered archaeological and historical records. Much of his other work focused on Britain during this time.

John Morris was the first professional historian to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the scattered evidence . Hardback History and Military Books. Arthur Rackham Hardback Original Antiquarian & Collectable Books. History Hardback Ages 4-8 Books for Children.

John Morris was the first professional historian to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the scattered evidence concerning the infant years of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, their influence on each other and their relationship with Europe.

John Morris's "The Age of Arthur" is over 600 pages long - and worth every sheet

John Morris's "The Age of Arthur" is over 600 pages long - and worth every sheet. In this one book, one can find not only one of the best scholarly evaluations of Dark Age British history ever written, but the publication which, perhaps more than any other,began the quest for the "historical Arthur. Anyone with an interest in this fascinating epoch should own this book, for use at the very least as a reference book! 0. Report. Recently Viewed and Featured.

John Morris has set himself a very. Tolkien, the highly revered author of "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy and "The Hobbit," has a new book coming out next spring

John Morris has set himself a very. hard task (in which to make mistakes is very easy and to find the truth is very hard). English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. Tolkien, the highly revered author of "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy and "The Hobbit," has a new book coming out next spring .

Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1999. 0 85323 564 3 - Volume 52 Issue 1 - JOHN HALDON. Article June 1983 · Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies.


Giamah
If John Morris never wrote another book, his AGE OF ARTHUR would have to be described as a lifetime achievement. I bought this book because I've been fascinated with King Arthur for some time, and this book is THE history of the period before, during and after Arthur. Only about one-fifth of the pages in the book are about Arthur's life, but Morris convincingly describes Arthur's time and his lasting effect on the cultures and governments of the British Islands. He also makes a convincing case that history is not predestined.
THE AGE OF ARTHUR covers a period that has been condescendingly labeled the "dark ages" by some. Morris suggests this age is not so much obscure as it has been overlooked. (Or was at the time he published his book. Many new "early Medieval studies" were published in the 1990s). Morris demonstrates that scholarship about this era can be carried out by using annals; lives of the saints; law codes; land grants and religious charters; "histories" such as those written by Gildas and Bede; graffiti and tomb inscriptions; poetry; chronicles; wills; genealogical records; archeological evidence from cemeteries, burial mounds, and barrows, houses, villages, encampments, battle fields and other sites; and linguistics analysis. He has done a magnificent job of identifying and synthesizing much of the extant material. His book is loaded with suggestions for scholars who want to continue investigating this era. I doubt you will find a better book for an overview of this period or for research leads.
Among other topics, I was intrigued with the various ways the Welsh (Angle for foreigner), Irish, Scots (Latin for Irish), and German peoples including the Angles of Arthur's age dealt with everyday issues. Their social and legal problems were not so very different, but the Irish and the Welsh (Roman Britains) appear to have been somewhat more practical and humane. They were much more concerned with compensation than revenge or punishment and more than once Morris refers to them as early humanists. For example, an (adulterous wife) was expected to compensate her offended husband by paying him "face money." Some of the old laws from this age are still "on the books." For example, the notion that seven years cohabitation by persons of opposite sex creates a "common-law marriage" is at least 1500 years old and is the law in places such as the Commonwealth of Virginia which follows English Common Law.
Talvinl
The trouble with writers who can write good English is that they can present bad arguments attractively. Let's face it: John Morris was a crank, a very learned, impressive crank, but a crank. My copy of his work is dotted with pencil notes that question his sanity; and while that was the immediate, unmediated response to the impact of a first reading, a subsequent and more placid view does not really mitigate the effect of some of his enormities.
His worst feature was a complete inability to tell the difference between legend and historical fact - understandable, perhaps, in a novice, but incomprehensible in a man who had spent all his life in scholarship. It is typical of his methods (to dignify them by that name) that he should take seriously the Kentish legend of Hengist and Horsa (as related by Nennius), in spite not only of its obviously legendary features but of the fact that it plainly contradicts everything that our best properly historical source, Gildas, has to tell about the first Saxon war. Gildas tells us that the war was a blitzkrieg caused by the sudden fury of starved barbarians; the legend makes it a long-prepared plan. Gildas tells us that it reached as far as the West Country; the legend restricts it to Kent. Gildas tells us that it was bloody but swift; the legend makes it last ten years. How does Morris get over these hurdles? Why, by a simple and airy remark: "accounts of the war north of the Thames have not survived". He should have said not only north of the Thames but west of the Medway; but let that pass, since at any rate it shows the level of his critical intellect. This sort of thing is highly damaging, not only because it legitimated the destructive scepticism of the currently prevalent Cambridge school of David Dumville and his followers, but because it has a lethal fascination for the unprepared reader, impressed (as some of the earlier reviews show) by the show of learning, and by the cohesive picture offered. The learning is not fake (although on a few occasions, especially when dealing with Rigothamus and Brittany, Morris leaves the impression of having invented sources, or at least read them very "creatively"); but learning is not enough, and a poorly grounded overall picture is worse than none at all. I have written myself about this period of British history, and am continuously surprised at Morris' blindness to obvious fact when inconvenient for his theories.
This book escapes getting only one star for two reasons: first, its genuinely excellent prose style; and second, that in the middle of the scholarly ordure there are a good few diamonds. From time to time, Morris comes up with genuinely brilliant ideas and insights (such as his argument for the existence of an individual insular idea of Empire, or his defence of the currently unpopular early dating of St.Patrick). But these are too widely scattered among a fluent tide of nonsense to be a reason to recommend the book. Though addressed to lay readers, this book is dangerous for them; it should be restricted to those who, having as much learning as Morris himself, are able to judge and condemn his arguments.
Thofyn
Ahh, the incredulous acceptance of youth. Yes, to think there once was a time, not so long ago as I might wish it were, when I accepted every pearl of Dr. Morris' wisdom without question. I'm much more well-read on the subject now, and much more academically rigorous, or so I'd like to think. No doubt this review will pain me one day as well, but for now, I must set my mistakes aright!
The Age of Arthur is a very big book on an age we really don't know very much about. How do you put together that much material on such a scanty base of primary sources? Why, by accepting your sources without question, of course! Dr. Morris, bless his soul, was a widely respected scholar in Britain, until he published this book. And while I may not like the vitrolic, rabid attacks launched against his late person because of this publication, the fact remains that there's too many holes in its historical content to use in any way except with the utmost caution. Dr. Morris uses here sources of often questionable reliability, and is often too scanty in his citations to pick apart the reliable history, from the unreliable source material, from Dr. Morris' own conclusions. It is a wonderful book, as historical fiction if nothing else, but as a history book ... be careful. Be very, very, very careful. And please, if that is what you intend to use it for, know your conventional history books backwards and forwards, before you pick this one up.