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by C.H.V. Sutherland
Download Roman History and Coinage, 44 B.C.-A.D. 69: Fifty Points of Relation from Julius Caesar to Vespasian fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    C.H.V. Sutherland
  • ISBN:
    0198721242
  • ISBN13:
    978-0198721246
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (August 6, 1987)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
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The period from Julius Caesar to Vespasian has been richly documented by the ancient historians Tacitus, Suetonius, Dio Cassius, and Velleius.

The period from Julius Caesar to Vespasian has been richly documented by the ancient historians Tacitus, Suetonius, Dio Cassius, and Velleius. While the historians generally recorded their personal views of the events that unfolded in this period, the highly detailed, profuse Roman coinage of the time presents a governmental view. This book compares the two media of histor The period from Julius Caesar to Vespasian has been richly documented by the ancient historians Tacitus, Suetonius, Dio Cassius, and Velleius.

By C. H. V. Sutherland. 22 14 cm. Pp. xiv+131, ills. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 21 April 2011.

CX255: The Transformation of Roman Society under Augustus (Lecture and Seminar Reading). Section: Section B: for everyone Previous: Augustus: image and substance.

com: Roman History and Coinage, 44 . This book compares the two media of historical record in relation to fifty events, common to both, for which the ancient historians are cited in full and the relevant coins are illustrated and discussed.

The period from Julius Caesar to Vespasian has been richly documented by the ancient historians Tacitus, Suetonius .

Similar books and articles. Roman Coinage From Antoninus to Commodus. Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart. Sutherland, C. Coinage and Currency in Roman Britain. De Bellinger - 1938 - Classical Weekly 31:153-154. Coinage in the Roman Economy, 300 BC to AD 700. K W Harl. A History of Ancient Coinage, 700–300 .

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Roman History and Coinage: 44 . Dürrenmatt believed that historical figures such as Nero and Caesar possess an allure for authors because of their mythic proportions

Roman History and Coinage: 44 . Dürrenmatt believed that historical figures such as Nero and Caesar possess an allure for authors because of their mythic proportions. Bursch demonstrates how various roles and motifs, particularly Petronius's sarcastic attitude toward Roman history and culture, influenced Dürrenmatt's Romulus. Prokop's history included an anecdote about Kaiser Honorius and his rooster.

The Roman leader Julius Caesar was stabbed 23 times by a mob of mutinous senators in 44 . Could he possibly have survived long enough to utter his famous. Julius Caesar was a renowned general, politician and scholar in ancient Rome who conquered the vast region of Gaul and helped initiate the end of the Roman Republic when he became dictator of the Roman Empire

Although Vagi's work is obviously not intended for the general reader, it is an excellent reference for anyone interested in Roman history.

The period from Julius Caesar to Vespasian has been richly documented by the ancient historians Tacitus, Suetonius, Dio Cassius, and Velleius. While the historians generally recorded their personal views of the events that unfolded in this period , the highly detailed, profuse Roman coinage of the time presents a governmental view. This book compares the two media of historical record in relation to fifty events, common to both, for which the ancient historians are cited in full and the relevant coins are illustrated and discussed.