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by James Hunter
Download Last of the Free: A Millennial History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    James Hunter
  • ISBN:
    1840180293
  • ISBN13:
    978-1840180299
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Mainstream Pub Co Ltd; 1st Ed. edition (September 15, 2000)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1435 kb
  • ePUB format
    1184 kb
  • DJVU format
    1424 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    656
  • Formats:
    lit txt doc docx


James Hunter is the author of a number of books on Scottish history including Culloden and the Last Clansman; Glencoe and the Indians; Last of the Free; and A Dance Called America.

James Hunter is the author of a number of books on Scottish history including Culloden and the Last Clansman; Glencoe and the Indians; Last of the Free; and A Dance Called America. Библиографические данные. Last of the Free: A Millennial History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland Millennial History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

The more recent history of the Highlands and Islands, in Hunter's opinion, has consisted mainly of attempts by the . most histories of Scotland tend to treat as if it amounted to the working out of some divine, and beneficent plan

The more recent history of the Highlands and Islands, in Hunter's opinion, has consisted mainly of attempts by the region's people to regain freedom and rights - including rights to land - of which they were deprived in the Middle Ages and afterwards. most histories of Scotland tend to treat as if it amounted to the working out of some divine, and beneficent plan. It is no surprise, that when in 1707, the Highlands and Islands became a part of the United Kingdom, rather than a part of the former self-governing Scotland which then merged with England, the immediate outcome as far as the Highlands.

Электронная книга "Last of the Free: A History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland", James Hunter. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Last of the Free: A History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Last of the Free : A Millennial History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

In this book, James Hunter shows how the Highlands and Islands of Scotland have evolved into the way they are now. Their more recent history has consisted mainly of attempts to regain freedoms and rights of which they were deprived in the Middle Ages and afterwards. Those attempts are succeeding, this book argues, should be encouraged by Scotland's new government.

Dr James Hunter CBE (born 1948) is Director for the UHI Centre for History, Chairman of the Isle of Eigg Heritage . Last of the free : a millennial history of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland Edinburgh: Mainstream. Culloden and the last clansman.

Dr James Hunter CBE (born 1948) is Director for the UHI Centre for History, Chairman of the Isle of Eigg Heritage Trust and formerly the Chairman of Highlands and Islands Enterprise, the Inverness-based development and training agency for the North of Scotland. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He is a freelance historian and author, and has written twelve books on Highlands and Islands themes. He gave the first Sabhal Mòr Lecture in 1990. Edinburgh: Mainstream.

Dr James Hunter CBE (born 1948) is a historian of the Highlands and Islands. In 2005 he founded the Centre for History in Dornoch as part of the University of the Highlands and Islands, serving as the head of the Centre between 2005-2010. Hunter has held a number of additional posts

A Brief History of the Universe and Humanity The impact of airline franchising on air service. 77,646 results found matching keyword history of the highlands and islands scotland.

A Brief History of the Universe and Humanity The impact of airline franchising on air service. service provision in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. A Brief History of the Universe and Humanity. Enrichetta Von hoffman. The impact of airline franchising on air service. Mainstream Publishing. ENG. Number of Pages.

The recorded history of Scotland begins with the arrival of the Roman Empire in the 1st century, when the province of Britannia reached as far north as the Antonine Wall

The recorded history of Scotland begins with the arrival of the Roman Empire in the 1st century, when the province of Britannia reached as far north as the Antonine Wall. North of this was Caledonia, inhabited by the Picti, whose uprisings forced Rome's legions back to Hadrian's Wall. As Rome finally withdrew from Britain, Gaelic raiders called the Scoti began colonising Western Scotland and Wales.

Written by a man who is both an award-winning historian of the Highlands and Islands and a key figure in shaping the region's future development, this is an account of how the Highlands and Islands of Scotland evolved into the way they are today. But the book is not simply the story of humanity's millennium-long involvement with one of the world's most spectacular localities. It is also a contribution to the present-day debate about how Scotland - and Britain - should be organized. James Hunter's central contention is that the Highlands and Islands were most successful when the region possessed a large measure of autonomy, which turned places like Iona and Kirkwall into centres of European significance. That autonomy was destroyed, he maintains, by mediaeval Scotland's monarchy, by 17th-century Scotland's parliament and by the British politicians who inherited the Scottish state's unrelenting determination to ensure that inhabitants of the Highlands and Islands had no worthwhile control over their own destinies. The more recent history of the Highlands and Islands, in Hunter's opinion, has consisted mainly of attempts by the region's people to regain freedom and rights - including rights to land - of which they were deprived in the Middle Ages and afterwards. Today those attempts are succeeding and, this book argues, ought to be encouraged by Scotland's new government. If it is to do better by the Highlands and Islands than Scottish governments of the past, it will have to see that devolution of political power does not stop in Edinburgh.

Hatе&love
The author provides a broad summary of the history of the Highlands and the Islands from the perspective of the people who lived there. The author does not get bogged down with details of battles, but concentrates on their implications and the social changes in the region. For an American with Highland roots and virtually no knowledge of the region and its history, this was a great starting point.
Chillhunter
Delivery better than other students waiting on copies from the bookstore. Well read but not abused. In good condition and a great price.
BroWelm
So i'm not entirely sure if i'm just reviewing the product or the condition i got it in or really what but, Freedom!!!!!!!!!!

I had to by the book for a class it was in good condition and came quickly.
Iaran
The title of this book was inspired by a speech by Calgacus (83 A.D.). When defending the loss of regional independence of the Highlands and Islands, he addressed his followers as the 'last of the free'. There is an introduction followed by a brief summary of 'The Most Distant dwellers upon Earth' - from 8000 B.C. to 87 A.D. Then we're into the real meat; eight chapters about the land and peoples who were the 'Last of the Free' from 88 A.D. to 1999. This is a wonderful read for all who are students of (Scottish) history and one of the best books written about the 'Highland Clearances' that I have read. James Hunter explains in detail, the history of the Highlands from the Middle Ages right up until the middle of the twentieth century. Make no mistake; this is not an easy read and one must take time to "absorb" the essential detail. As my g-g-grandfather emigrated from Mull in 1852, I was especially interested in the latter chapters on The Hebrides and the period of the clearances which started late in the 17th century and continued well into the nineteenth century.

The penultimate chapter refers to the "Napier Commission", a report by Lord Napier recommending reform and published in April 1884. Far from solving the crofting problem, the report actually renewed unrest, leading eventually to the formation of the Highland Law Reform Association which later became the Highland Land League.

And finally some quotes from Page 382 - "Almost from the moment of Scotland's emergence, its political class, often by violent means, sought agressively to expand the country's borders in order to bring the entire Highlands and Islands within those borders....much of the story of the Highlands and Islands consists of the downside of a process of Scottish nation-building which most histories of Scotland tend to treat as if it amounted to the working out of some divine, and beneficent plan......It is no surprise, that when in 1707, the Highlands and Islands became a part of the United Kingdom, rather than a part of the former self-governing Scotland which then merged with England, the immediate outcome as far as the Highlands and Islands were concerned, was a tightening, not a slackening, of external control."