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Download The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy : A Guide to the Fiction of the Napoleonic Wars fb2

by Richard Lawrence,Nicholas Blake
Download The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy : A Guide to the Fiction of the Napoleonic Wars fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    Richard Lawrence,Nicholas Blake
  • ISBN:
    1861760906
  • ISBN13:
    978-1861760906
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Greenhill Books/Lionel Leventhal (June 30, 2003)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1167 kb
  • ePUB format
    1781 kb
  • DJVU format
    1338 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    119
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf txt doc


Richard Lawrence, who illustrated the book, is an accomplished graphic artist and designer who recently coauthored "The .

Richard Lawrence, who illustrated the book, is an accomplished graphic artist and designer who recently coauthored "The Period House. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

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Excellent Companion Book for Nautical Fiction. Published by Thriftbooks.

Excellent Companion Book for Nautical Fiction. com User, 19 years ago. "The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy" is a wonderful repository of information about ships, life at sea, and naval warfare during the era of Jack Aubrey, Richard Bolitho, and Horation Hornblower (frequent mention of these and other fictional Royal Navy officers is made in the book, placing them in the real life context). The range of material covered is very broad, and it is attractively and concisely presented, often in a graphical or tabular form

You are viewing This text describes in detail every aspect of the navy of the Nelsonic era and seeks to relate it to the novels that are based on its operations and feats in battle.

The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy: A Guide to the Fiction of the Napoleonic Wars by Nicholas Blake, Richard Russell Lawrence (Hardback, 1999). This text describes in detail every aspect of the navy of the Nelsonic era and seeks to relate it to the novels that are based on its operations and feats in battle.

Description of illustrations This lavishly illustrated book contains some rarely seen contemporary paintings, including one by Nicholas Pocock of the Line-of-Battle .

Description of illustrations This lavishly illustrated book contains some rarely seen contemporary paintings, including one by Nicholas Pocock of the Line-of-Battle (by kind permission of John Hood), and many prints contemporary to the period by John & Dominic Serres, Cook, Baugean, Rowlandson and other contemporary sources such as Chapman's Architectura Mercatoria Navalis and Falconer's Universal Dictionary of The Marine; augmented. Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase.

In stock with supplier. Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy. A Guide to the Fiction of the Napoleonic Wars. This book describes in detail every aspect of the navy of that period and seeks to relate it to the novels that are based on its operations and feats in battle. Richard Russell Lawrence.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy by. .The genre has delighted millions of readers but this book is the first to explain, with reference to the novels, that harsh but fascinating world in which those heroes lived.

The genre has delighted millions of readers but this book is the first to explain, with reference to the novels, that harsh but fascinating world in which those heroes lived.

This book describes in detail every aspect of the navy of that period and seeks to relate it to the novels that are based on its operations . left side: the Organisation of Navy Board right side: the course of the Wars 1793 - 1815.

This book describes in detail every aspect of the navy of that period and seeks to relate it to the novels that are based on its operations and feats in battle.

Nicholas Blake, Richard Lawrence. Stackpole Books, 2000 - 207 sayfa. The genre has delighted millions of readers but this book is the first to explain, with reference to the novels, that harsh but fascinating world in which those heroes lived

Nicholas Blake, Richard Lawrence. This Companion brings every aspect of the navy vividly to life. The workings of the Admiralty; the design and building of ships; food, drink, entertainment, discipline, medicine, fighting tactics, gunnery, seamanship and shiphandling - all this and much more is described and explained.

Shipped from UK, please allow 10 to 21 business days for arrival. Very Good, A very good, near fine copy in blue cloth boards, with a very good/fine dust jacket. Nicholas Blake, Richard Lawrence. 207 p., ill. (some col.), maps, ports.

Bajinn
"The Illustrated Companion to Nelson's Navy" is a wonderful repository of information about ships, life at sea, and naval warfare during the era of Jack Aubrey, Richard Bolitho, and Horation Hornblower (frequent mention of these and other fictional Royal Navy officers is made in the book, placing them in the real life context). The range of material covered is very broad, and it is attractively and concisely presented, often in a graphical or tabular form. The book is illustrated with hundreds of drawings, paintings and diagrams, many of them from contemporary sources. If you want information about ship types, naval weapons, life on board, battles, ship handling, sails and rigging, watches and bells, rates of pay, distribution of prize money, and seemingly almost anything else you can think of, this is a very handy place to find it. I strongly recommend this book for anyone interested in learning about the background to the novels of Patrick O'Brian, Alexander Kent, Dudley Pope, and C.S. Forester.
GAMER
This is a handy supplement to the larger "Nelson's Navy" and worth picking up. I would have given it four stars but for some of the lesser quality "sketches" that make up a large portion of the illustrations. That being said, the book IS a great little quick reference guide.
Faulkree
A good reference for model ship builders and the history enthusiast. Numerous photo's, drawings. diagrams, a good glossary of sea terms.

Written as an addition to Nelson's navy the ships, men and organization 1793 -1815. Both books give a very thorough history of the Royal Navy of the time.
Worth the price.
Kekinos
Excellent information - useful when reading Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey and Maturin series (starting with Master and Commander) or the Hornblower books.
Kikora
When the world discovered Patrick O'Brian a decade and a half ago, the immense popularity of the Jack Aubrey novels also engendered a cottage industry of explanatory volumes for those not versed in the history and daily life of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic era. I've read nearly all those books and nearly all of them have something useful to say about the ins and out of sail-driven warships, the dense tangle of jargon, the naval bureaucracy, the nature of strategy and tactics at sea, and the key players who make up the background to the novels. And that's true here, too, to a considerable extent. It's a pity that the execution is so sloppy with this one. Unlike experts like Brian Lavery and Geoff Hunt and James McGuane and Steve Pope, Blake is not an expert in the field. He's a desk editor at Macmillan -- who apparently declined to publish his book themselves. He organizes what he wants to say under the usual rubrics: The background, the navy, the sailors, the ships, the war itself. He includes numerous diagrams and maps and charts and lists. And he doesn't restrict himself to O'Brian, bringing in quotes and examples from C. S. Forester and Dudley Pope and a number of other authors -- though I spotted a number of errors regarding the literature without even the need to pull of my own copies off the shelf. On the facts of the real world of the Royal Navy, it's not bad.. But it's an illustrated book, and the artwork simply sucks. I've seen many of the illustrations before, in earlier books like this -- that's inevitable -- but here Rowlandson's satirical portraits, for example, are reworked as foggy watercolor washes devoid of useful detail. Some of the illustrations are simply impenetrable (look at pages 103 or 119 or 127!), especially when it comes to uniforms and ship's gear. Instead of an impressionist, Blake should have hired a trained draughtsman. The reader of a book like this wants to see careful, precise, detailed treatments of the subjects that interest him, not muddy sketches or unnecessary re-imaginings of classic drawings and prints. The citations are pitiful, as well; "from a nineteenth-century source" is not a useful reference. The text is actually pretty good (bar some sloppy copyediting) but surely the words are embarrassed by the images with which they share the page. It will be most useful to the reader who already is familiar with the subject matter -- much less so to the novice. But for a reference work, I recommend Lavery or Hunt.
Cyregaehus
I found this book to be quite useful due to the amount of information presented in a relatively small space. All of the data can easily be found in other books, but it's nice to have so much of it all in one place. The writing is competent and the author obviously loves his subject. Overall the book provides an entertaining glimpse into the British navy at the height of it's power during the great age of sail. My problem with the book is in it's presentation. The illustrator, Richard Lawrence, has a style that might most charitably be described as amateurish. Further the layout of the book is a mish-mosh of period illustrations (often badly or muddily scanned and printed in garish blue), Lawrence's original art as well as his copies or adaptations of period illustrations, and less than stellar "Adobe Illustrator"-style drawings used to illustrate some technical points (the jacket illustration is by Geoff Hunt and is quite nice). The overall effect is jarring and the lack of competence in the design and illustration makes the book a difficult read. I guess my major complaint is simply that I've been wanting a book just like this one for years (it might have been great) and I'm just dissapointed at the ham-handedness of this volume's presentation.
Thomeena
When I was much younger and first started reading the Horatio Hornblower books by C.S. Forester, I was blown away by the authenticity, yet puzzled by the jargon - what's a halliard, for example, or a topsail? What does it mean to shorten sail, and what is the lee side of a ship? This book would have helped immensely. It's not overly technical, nor does it swamp you with minutiae, but it gives you a good general overview of the British ships of the Napoleonic era, what the nautical terms are, what life was like on board and a couple of summaries of battles for good measure.
This is an appetizer, but what an appetizer it is. If you're looking for more technical specs of ships of the line look elsewhere, but if you're a newbie to the entire historical nautical fiction scene, I can think of few better places to start.