» » Coalmining Women: Victorian Lives and Campaigns (Women in History)

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by Angela V. John
Download Coalmining Women: Victorian Lives and Campaigns (Women in History) fb2
Europe
  • Author:
    Angela V. John
  • ISBN:
    0521278724
  • ISBN13:
    978-9814405003
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (November 30, 1984)
  • Pages:
    48 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1292 kb
  • ePUB format
    1389 kb
  • DJVU format
    1891 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    956
  • Formats:
    lit doc txt mbr


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The status of women in the Victorian era was often seen as an illustration of the striking discrepancy between the United Kingdom's national power and wealth and what many, then and now, consider its appalling social conditions

The status of women in the Victorian era was often seen as an illustration of the striking discrepancy between the United Kingdom's national power and wealth and what many, then and now, consider its appalling social conditions. During the era symbolized by the reign of British monarch Queen Victoria, women did not have the right to vote, sue, or own property.

Angela John’s biographies not only introduce us to women who sought to. .Victorian Lives and Campaigns. Cambridge University Press, 1984. Fourth printing, 1989.

Angela John’s biographies not only introduce us to women who sought to change women’s position as well as society, they subtly subvert our simple assumptions about gender, class and national identity. The Actors’ Crucible: Port Talbot and the Making of Burton, Hopkins, Sheen and All the Others. Angela V. John and Parthian have done their subject prou. urning the Tide is a very fine political and cultural biography’. Angela John's excellent biography is to be warmly welcomed’. Evelyn Sharp: Rebel Woman, 1869-1955.

The, attempt to restrict women’s work at the mines in the 1880s highlights the dichotomy between the fashionable . The pit brow lasses who sorted coal and performed a variety of jobs above ground at British coal mines prompted a violent debate about women’s work in the nineteenth century.

The, attempt to restrict women’s work at the mines in the 1880s highlights the dichotomy between the fashionable ideal of womanhood and the necessity and reality of female manual labour. Although only a tiny percentage of the colliery labour force, the pit lasses aroused an interest out of all proportion to their numbers and their work became a test case for women’s outdoor manual employment.

Angela John discusses the implications of this debate, showing how it encapsulates many of.

Angela John discusses the implications of this debate, showing how it encapsulates many of the ambivalences of late Victorian attitudes towards working-class female employment, and at the same time raises wider questions both about women’s work in industries seen as traditionally male enclaves, and about the ways in which women within the working community have been presented by historians. This book was first published in 1980.

Victorian women's lives and their role expected in society. A woman was considered secondary and main role was to support famiy.

Striking Women- These women worked at the surface of the coal mines .

Striking Women- These women worked at the surface of the coal mines, cleaning coal, loading tubs, etc. They wore short trousers, clogs and aprons as these clothes were safer near machinary. Women were forbidden to go down the mines in Victorian times, but could be employed in equally heavy industry on the pit face. This is one image from over 50 in an album assembled in Carte de visite. Alongside the more well-known scenes of soldiers living in the trenches, a new exhibition shows pictures, letters and objects of the women they left behind. RichandBrenda Williams.

Angela John’s book fills one of the many important gaps in our knowledge women workers in the Victorian period. We provide complimentary e-inspection copies of primary textbooks to instructors considering our books for course adoption.

100 Women Who Changed the World: the results Josephine Butler brought into open discussion in Victorian Britain the double sexual standard that existed in a male-dominated society.

100 Women Who Changed the World: the results. Which woman has had the biggest impact on world history? We asked you to vote on a shortlist of 100 figures selected by 10 experts. The actual details of her life are veiled as much as they are elucidated by the New Testament. Josephine Butler brought into open discussion in Victorian Britain the double sexual standard that existed in a male-dominated society. She campaigned successfully for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts which provided for the compulsory and regular medical examination of women believed to be prostitutes, but not their male clients.

Posts about coal mine workers female women victorian written by. dress of Victorian prostitutes

Posts about coal mine workers female women victorian written by. dress of Victorian prostitutes. Victorian Working Women, by Michael Hiley (Book Recommendation) witness2fashion. These fascinating black and white pictures taken by photographer John Thompson show the reality of existence in the when photography was in its infancy. Community Post: The exotic down and outs of Victorian London.

In the nineteenth century the rapidly expanding coal industry was the key to Britain's industrial growth. The workforce consisted not only of men, but also of thousands of coalmining women, who mined, sorted and transported the coal. Angela John looks at the lives and struggles of these women, and their fight in the 1880s to keep their jobs at the pit. She focuses on the contrasting careers of two women from very different backgrounds: Jane Brown, a Lancashire pit lass; and campaigner Margaret Park, and Mayoress of Wigan. Through the campaign, the author throws new light on Victorian attitudes to working women, and working conditions in general in a major nineteenth-century industry.