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by Jehanne Wake
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Europe
  • Author:
    Jehanne Wake
  • ISBN:
    0002170760
  • ISBN13:
    978-0002170765
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperCollins Publishers Ltd; First Edition edition (March 7, 1988)
  • Pages:
    464 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1920 kb
  • ePUB format
    1988 kb
  • DJVU format
    1662 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    935
  • Formats:
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Jehanne Wake is a British biographer, historian and archivist.

Jehanne Wake is a British biographer, historian and archivist. She has written critically acclaimed biographies of Princess Louise, the sixth child of Queen Victoria, and of the four early American Caton sisters known as "the American graces", amongst other books. Jehanne Wake had an international upbringing before she studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) at Oxford University. She was one of the first generation of female graduate trainee investment bankers in the City of London

As a daughter of Queen Victoria, she was allotted by Parliament a certain amount of money each year. This biography has many details about the life of Princess Louise, who was certainly unconventional but within a narrow framework

As a daughter of Queen Victoria, she was allotted by Parliament a certain amount of money each year. It was not ample but perhaps was adequate to cloth and house her as befitting a royal princess. Unfortunately her husband's family slipped into difficult financial circumstances after the couple's return to England. This biography has many details about the life of Princess Louise, who was certainly unconventional but within a narrow framework. From the days of her unhappy childhood, through her marriage and then the years of widowhood, we can see the apparently luxurious but severely circumscribed life she led.

Queen Victoria's Mysterious Daughter: A Biography of Princess Louise. 3 people found this helpful. The Last Princess: The Devoted Life of Queen Victoria's Youngest Daughter. As a daughter of Queen Victoria, she was allotted by Parliament a certain amount of money each year.

Princess Louise book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Princess Louise: Queen Victoria's Unconventional Daughter as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, was the sixth child of Queen Victoria

Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, was the sixth child of Queen Victoria.

Princess Louise: Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter (1988), Sisters of Fortune . Jehanne Wake is a British biographer, historian and archivist.

Princess Louise: Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter (1988), Sisters of Fortune, America’s Caton Sisters at Home and Abroad (2010). Jehanne Wake is a British biographer, historian and archivist Contents.

Princess Louise-Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter, by Jehanne Wake (London: Collins, 1988)

Princess Louise-Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter, by Jehanne Wake (London: Collins, 1988). Victoria’s Daughters, by Jerrold M. Packard (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998). For more royal intrigue and Victorian romance, look for Princess Louise and Stephen Byrne when they return for guest roles in Seducing the Princess, by Mary Hart Perry, the next novel in the Novels of Queen Victoria’s Daughters series. Youngest of all of Victoria’s children, Beatrice is destined to remain forever her mother’s companion in her declining years, and if the queen gets her way, Bea will remain pure and never marry.

Princess Louise: Queen Victoria's unconventional daughter. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780002170765.

Princess Louise: Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter (1988), Sisters of. .Jehanne Wake is a British biographer, historian and archivist

Princess Louise: Queen Victoria’s Unconventional Daughter (1988), Sisters of Fortune, America’s Caton Sisters at Home and Abroad (2010).

JEHANNE WAKE is a historian who has written about both royalty and money. Her books include a short biography of Florence Nightingale; Princess Louise: Queen Victoria's Unconventional Daughter and Kleinwort Benson: the History of Two Families in Banking.


Breder
I really liked this book and feel that it deserves the 5 star rating. I have read many biographies, including others about the children of British royalty, but I feel that this one was one of the best. Princess Louise really comes alive as a person, woman, sibling, and daughter. Also, since she married a commoner, she was able to achieve a certain amount of escape from her prescribed role as princess. She related well to her husband and his family becoming very close to her mother-in-law and some of her sisters-in-law. When her husband was sent to represent the crown in Canada, Louise really came into her own. She was able to escape even more of the bonds placed on her by her position in England as the daughter of Queen Victoria. She and her husband traveled extensively through Canada and even large parts of the USA. She was so loved by the people in British Colombia that there was some effort made to separate from Canada and form a new country with Louise as its queen. Obviously that didn't happen, but at that time there was no overland transportation to BC, and travel was by ship up the coast from California.

Upon her return to England, she found the Queen's court dull and boring. She did maintain her interest in charitable projects and continued with her work as an artist and sculptor. I believe that some of her works of art endure to this day. She was also greatly interested in architecture and home design. She upgraded most of the mansions or palaces in which she lived. She was great friends with many of the artists and architects of her day.

Louise had periods in her life of great energy and motivation, but as was true of all the royal family, she also endured times of intense pain, probably rheumatic or arthritic and had to take to her bed. Her relationship with her employees and servants was informal, but in spite of occasional tantrums and rages, she was able to keep their respect as well as their friendship. As a daughter of Queen Victoria, she was allotted by Parliament a certain amount of money each year. It was not ample but perhaps was adequate to cloth and house her as befitting a royal princess. Unfortunately her husband's family slipped into difficult financial circumstances after the couple's return to England. Actually, perhaps he was from Scotland. Ian, her husband, was the oldest son and was the heir to the Dukeship of Argyll, but his father lived to a ripe old age. The father married 3 times, and this, together with the bankruptcy of some of the younger sons, resulted in Ian not having the resources to maintain his estates when he finally came into his inheritance. Although the marriage had been strained over the couple's return to Britain (Louise wanted to stay in Canada for their full term of six years, but Ian had gained an early return to the mother country by pleading his wife's delicate health.), as the years went on, they became closer again, and Louise used her income to help to maintain some of the main estates of the Duke of Argyll. After Ian's death, Louise continued to live a comfortable although not excessively luxurious life with a minimum of servants to the ripe old age of 90.

The great sorrow of Louise's life was that she never had any children. As in most books about royalty, the author uses the title of the characters sometimes instead of their names, and as their titles change as the older generation dies off, sometimes I really didn't know who was being mentioned. On Kindle it is harder to go back and review the characters than it is in a paper book, or at least I find it that way. I just read on, hoping that the context would eventually reveal the person whom I knew by their first name. That is the only criticism I have of the book.
Dondallon
This biography has many details about the life of Princess Louise, who was certainly unconventional but within a narrow framework. From the days of her unhappy childhood, through her marriage and then the years of widowhood, we can see the apparently luxurious but severely circumscribed life she led. Unfortunately, Princess Louise was a talented artist and sculptor but did not have, or did not take, the opportunity to develop more fully her gifts. I think the biography would have been strengthened by giving more focus to this aspect of her life and to the artistic friendships she did manage to cultivate.
After all, this talent is really what made her different. Another area that gave her life meaning was her work in education of girls and young women but these are mentioned more as lists of activities. The reader also plows through a large number of facts and descriptions but not much in the way of interpretation. And there is much to interpret: her relationship with her mother (and let's face it, Queen Victoria was a ghastly, selfish mother in many ways); her childless marriage to Lorne; her relationships with her close kin, especially the seemingly difficult ones with her two younger sisters. In the end, she was not so very unconventional, spending, as she did, most of her time engaged in "royal" activities and living out her life in Kensington Palace, the "aunty heap". Reading this book makes one realize that the life of a royal princess, at least in the past, was one of great limitation in many ways, and I wonder how much in common the tragic Princess Margaret had with her great, great aunt.
Naril
I have never seemed to be able to get enough of English history and think that I probably know enough now to teach a history class. Victoria and Albert are my passion, but I have always been interested in their children, too. I could never seem to find much on this fourth daughter. When I ran across this book, I had to have it. I could hardly put it down. It was very well written and brought this special daughter to life. What a remarkable woman she was! Now, I am going to seek out books about her husband, Lorne, the Duke of Argyll, because I know I will be able to find some additional information about her there, as well. Thank you for such a wonderful book, Jehanne Wake!
Jelar
Princess Louise was the sixth child of Queen Victoria. She married the son of a Scottish duke.

This is an interesting biography that gives insight not just into the Princess but also court life during the Victorian and Edwardian eras.

It is full of details of everyday life and the ups and downs of her life.

The downside of this otherwise well written book is that background on individuals is only given when they are introduced the first time. When the person is introduced a second time, the reader is left to try to recall the individual's background.
Pooker
I knew nothing about Princess Louise, but am fascinated about that time period and am glad I chose it. Did not know that she lived in Canada for 5 years and loved it, she travelled extensively through the U.S. and counted Mark Twain as a personal friend. I also did not know that she was a professional caliber artist.. A look into the life of a very multi-faceted woman and gave more info on the psychology of Queen Victoria and how she treated her children when young and as adults. If you are interested in royalty, this is a great choice
Tuliancel
Great biography of the most interesting and artistic daughte of Queen Victoria Advance for her time she sponsor many noble causes specially for women Iove it !
Dilkree
Princess Louise reminds me of Princess Diana. She was original, loved beauty, a rebel when she did not want to follow the straight path laid our for her.She will be remembered as the most interesting of Queen Victoria's children.Her sculpture will stand forever as testimony to her talent.